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Amaury Nolasco

Amaury Nolasco Garrido is a Puerto Rican actor and producer, best known for the role of Fernando Sucre on the Fox television series Prison Break, for his role in Transformers. Nolasco was born in Puerto Rico. After various acting gigs, Nolasco moved to New York City. Nolasco has guest-starred in various television series such as Arli$$, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, ER, his first role on a feature film was in Takeshi Kitano's Brother, along others as "Orange Julius" in Universal's 2 Fast 2 Furious. He went on to co-star opposite Bernie Mac in Mr. 3000. Nolasco's additional television and film credits include roles on George Lopez and CSI: NY, in The Benchwarmers, he appeared on Mind of Mencia as a guest on Sunday, April 29, 2007. He starred in the movie adaptation of the Transformers, released during the summer of 2007. Director Michael Bay offered him to return to the sequel Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, but he declined due to scheduling conflicts, his most high-profile role was Prison Break.

Nolasco has a role in "Telenovela." In November 2009, Nolasco made an appearance in Wisin & Yandel's music video "Imagínate" featuring T-Pain alongside Wilmer Valderrama. He plays a jealous mobster, he appears in Calle 13's music video "La Perla". In March 2010, Nolasco guest-starred in 3 episodes during the second season of Southland as Detective Rene Cordero. From September 2010 to May 2011, he costarred in the NBC show Chase, a one-season show about US Marshalls that hunt down fugitives, he starred in the short-lived ABC television series Work It which premiered on January 3, 2012. Nolasco began dating Jennifer Morrison in 2009, the relationship lasted three years, he was a supporter of the presidential campaign of Barack Obama. For the second year in a row, Nolasco was the host of the Amaury Nolasco & Friends Golf Classic that took place in El Conquistador Hotel in Fajardo, Puerto Rico from June 10–11, 2011; the Amaury Nolasco & Friends Golf Classic is a celebrity golf tournament, where all the profits go to non-profit Puerto Rican organizations.

For the second season, the profits went to the University of Puerto Rico Pediatric Hospital and to the VAL Foundation, an organization that gives their funding to pediatric cancer patients. Nolasco has been nominated three times for an ALMA Award, once for a Teen Choice Award. List of Puerto Ricans Amaury Nolasco on IMDb Biodata Prison Break website entry for Nolasco

Flag of Azerbaijan

The national flag of the Republic of Azerbaijan is a horizontal tricolour featuring three sized fesses of blue and green, with a white crescent and an eight-pointed star in the center. The tricolour replaced an earlier design used by the Azerbaijan SSR; the blue symbolizes Azerbaijan's Turkic heritage, the red stands for progress, the green represents Islam, the religion of majority of Azerbaijanis. The official colors and size were adopted on 5 February 1991; this flag was used from 9 November 1918 to 1920, when Azerbaijan was independent, it was revived with slight variations on 5 February 1991. The nickname for the flag is Üçrəngli Bayraq; the flag is mentioned two times in the national anthem. On land, the flag is used as the civil and war flag; the flag has official status in the Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic. A presidential decree declared 9 November, the date when in 1918 this flag was adopted as the national flag of Azerbaijan Democratic Republic, as the national Flag Day; the national flag of Azerbaijan consists of three horizontal stripes of equal width, from top to bottom: light blue and green.

In the center are a white crescent and eight-pointed star. The basic description of the flag, along with the ratio, can be found in the Constitution of Azerbaijan, adopted 12 November 1995: State flag of the Azerbaijan Republic consists of three horizontal stripes of same width. Upper stripe is blue, middle stripe is red, the lower one is green. Width of the flag constitutes half of its length. Further specifications of the national flag were detailed in the Presidential Decree "On the National Flag of the Republic of Azerbaijan" issued on 5 February 1991; the ratio was kept at 1:2, used in the Soviet era. Each stripe extends the full length; the star and crescent were placed in a box that has a ratio of 3:4. The outside diameter of both the crescent and the red inside circle intersects with the diameter of the star; the diameter of the star is one-sixth the height of the flag. The flag is described in the technical specification "AZS 001-2006. Azərbaycan Respublikasının Dövlət Bayrağı. Texniki şərtlər."

Published by the State Committee on Standardization and Patents of the Republic of Azerbaijan in 2006. The colors of the national flag are green, sky blue, white. Exact specifications for its colors were issued in the 2004 decree "On the Rules of the National Flag of the Republic of Azerbaijan"; the colors updated in 2013, specified in Pantone, are as follows: The sky blue symbolizes Turkic Multinationalism, the red is for the progress to establish a modern state and the development of democracy, green shows the nation's relation to the Muslim world. In the middle of the flag, appearing on both front and back, are a white crescent and an eight-pointed star; the first President of the Azerbaijani National Council Mammed Amin Rasulzade noted in his speech, at the parliament's session of the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic, that the colors relate to Turkic freedom and Islamic culture. The composer of the anthem of Azerbaijan Uzeyir Hajibeyov includes in the song references to the meaning of the flag: blue for Azerbaijan's multinationalism, red for progress and culture, green for Islam.

According to historian Nasib Nasibli, Ali bey Huseynzade, one of the ideologists of Azerbaijan's independence, developed the combination based on colors used in 1895. While the crescent and star are seen as markers of Islam, some historians and researchers disagree about why an eight-pointed star is used on the flag of Azerbaijan. Fatali Khan Khoyski points to the eight letters in the word "Azerbaijan"; the eight points of the star are thought to stand for the eight Turkic peoples of Azerbaijan. The problem is there are only seven Turkic peoples: Azeris, Jagatais, Kipchaks and Turkomans. It's possible the Kipchaks reflect two peoples, the Kazakhs and Kyrgyz, which would make eight; the classification of Turkic peoples pre-Soviet era was different from. In 1828, after the last Russo-Persian War, several Khanates of the Caucasus were annexed to the Russian Empire; when the Russian Empire collapsed, Russian Azerbaijan declared its independence and joined the short-lived Transcaucasian Democratic Federative Republic, together with Georgia and Armenia.

This unified state hardly was soon dissolved. Since the Republic was short-lived, it did not use any symbols; some historians consider a horizontal gold and red tricolor, similar to that of the German flag but arranged differently, to have been flag of Transcaucasia. The federation was dissolved on 26 May 1918, when Georgia declared its independence as the Democratic Republic of Georgia. Both Armenia and Azerbaijan declared their independence two days on 28 May 1918, as the First Republic of Armenia and the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic, respectively. After gaining independence, the blue-red-green tricolour was adopted by the government of the Democratic Republic of Azerbaijan on 9 November 1918. Azerbaijan was the first modern democratic state in the Muslim world; the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic lasted only 23 months until the Bolshevik 11th Soviet Red Army invaded it, establishing the Azerbaijan SSR on 28 April 1920. Although the bulk of th

List of earthquakes in 2011

This is a list of earthquakes in 2011. Only earthquakes of magnitude 6 or above are included, unless they result in damage and/or casualties, or are notable for some other reason. All dates are listed according to UTC time; the 9.1 Tōhoku earthquake was the fourth most powerful recorded and triggered a massive tsunami. In a busy year, many quakes caused damage in Turkey, New Zealand, India, or Spain. Note that an increase in detected earthquake numbers does not represent an increase in earthquakes per se. Population increase, habitation spread, advances in earthquake detection technology all contribute to higher earthquake numbers being recorded over time. USGS's Earthquake Myths has more information. For exact dates and live earthquakes please visit USGS's Global Earthquake Search Page and Real-time Earthquake Map or EMSC's Real-time Seismicity. Note: At least 10 dead Note: At least 7.0 magnitude Note: Aftershocks of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami are included as they are still over magnitude 7.

A magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Santiago del Estero Province, Argentina, on January 1. At a depth of 583.6 km, shaking was weak and was not felt. A magnitude 7.1 earthquake struck the Araucanía Region, Chile, on January 2. A magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck the Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia, on January 5. A magnitude 6.9 earthquake struck Vanuatu on January 9. A magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck Vanuatu on January 9. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck Chile on January 10. A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck the Bonin Islands on January 12. A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck the Fiji Islands on January 13. A magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck the Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia, on January 13. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck southern Sumatra, Indonesia, on January 17. A magnitude 7.2 earthquake struck southwestern Pakistan 45 km west of Dalbandin on January 18. A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck Tajikistan on January 24. A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck Simeulue, Indonesia, on January 26. A magnitude 6.2 earthquake struck southeastern Iran on January 27.

A magnitude 6.2 earthquake struck Jan Mayen island region on January 29. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck Tonga on January 31. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck the south of Samoa on February 3. A magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck the Myanmar-India border region on February 4. A magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck the Solomon Islands on February 7. A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck the Celebes Sea on February 10. A magnitude 6.6 earthquake struck the Celebes Sea on February 10 following an earlier earthquake. A magnitude 6.8 earthquake struck offshore the Biobío Region, Chile, on February 11. A magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck the Biobío Region, Chile, on February 11. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck Arauco Province, Chile, on February 11. A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck Concepción Province, Chile, on February 12. A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck Tonga on February 12. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck near the coast of Talcahuano, Chile, on February 13. A magnitude 6.6 earthquake struck offshore the Maule Region, Chile, on February 14.

A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck Sulawesi on February 15. A magnitude 6.2 earthquake struck near the east coast of Kamchatka, Russia on February 20. A magnitude 6.6 earthquake struck south of the Fiji islands on February 21. A magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck the Canterbury region, New Zealand, on February 22, killing 185 people and devastating Christchurch. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck Veracruz, Mexico, on February 25. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck Easter Island, Chile, on March 1. A magnitude 6.2 earthquake struck Tarapacá, Chile, on March 6. A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck the South Sandwich Islands on March 6. A magnitude 6.6 earthquake struck the Solomon Islands on March 7. A magnitude 7.3 earthquake struck near the east coast of Honshu, Japan, on March 9. A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck Papua New Guinea on March 9. A magnitude 5.4 earthquake struck the Myanmar-China border region on March 10. A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck the Bali Sea on March 10. A magnitude 9.1 earthquake struck Honshu, Japan, on March 11, triggering a deadly tsunami and causing widespread devastation killing nearly 18,500 people.

A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck Tonga on March 12. A magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck Vanuatu on March 17. A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck the northern Luzon region of the Philippines on March 20. A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck the southern Mid-Atlantic ridge on March 22. A magnitude 6.8 earthquake struck the east of Shan State in Myanmar on March 24, claiming lives in both Myanmar and Thailand. Note: A number of large aftershocks were recorded following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake that occurred in Japan on March 11. In order to eliminate cluttering, the March aftershocks have not been included. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck eastern Honshu, Japan on April 1. A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck the Dodecanese Islands, that occurred on April 1. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck the Tarapacá Region, Chile, on April 2. A magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck the Fiji Island Region on April 3. A magnitude 6.7 earthquake struck south of Java, Indonesia, on April 3. A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck Veracruz, Mexico, on April 7.

A magnitude 7.1 earthquake struck near the east coast of Honshu, Japan, on April 7, killing four people. A magnitude 6.2 earthquake struck Kyushu, Japan, on April 9. A magnitude 6.6 earthquake struck Japan, on April 11, killing seven people. A magnitude 6.2 earthquake struck near the east coast of Honshu, Japan, on April 11. A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck eastern Honshu, Japan, on April 12. A magnitude 6.1 earthquake struck off the east coast of Honshu, Japan, on April 13. A magnitude 6.6 earthquake struck