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Amazons

In Greek mythology, the Amazons were a tribe of warrior women believed to live in Asia Minor. Apollonius Rhodius, in his Argonautica, mentions that the Amazons were the daughters of Ares and Harmonia, that they were brutal and aggressive, their main concern in life was war. Lysias, Philostratus the Elder say that their father was Ares. Herodotus and Strabo place them on the banks of the Thermodon River. According to Diodorus, giving the account of Dionysius of Mitylene, the Amazons inhabited Ancient Libya long before they settled along the Thermodon. Migrating from Libya, these Amazons passed through Egypt and Syria, stopped at the Caïcus in Aeolis, near which they founded several cities. Diodorus maintains, they established Mytilene a little way beyond the Caïcus. Aeschylus, in Prometheus Bound, places the original home of the Amazons in the country about Lake Maeotis, from which they moved to Themiscyra on the Thermodon. Homer tells that the Amazons were found somewhere near Lycia. Notable queens of the Amazons are Penthesilea, who participated in the Trojan War, her sister Hippolyta, whose magical girdle, given to her by her father Ares, was the object of one of the labours of Heracles.

The Amazons fought on the side of Troy against the Greeks during the Trojan War. Diodorus mentions. Amazon warriors were depicted in battle with Greek warriors in amazonomachies in classical art. Archaeological discoveries of burial sites with female warriors on the Eurasian Steppes suggest that the Scythian women may have inspired the Amazon myth. From the early modern period, their name has become a term for female warriors in general. Amazons were said to have founded the cities and temples of Smyrna, Cyme, Ephesus, Magnesia, Pygela and Amastris. Palaephatus, trying to rationalize the Greek myths in his On Unbelievable Tales, wrote that the Amazons were men who were mistaken for women by their enemies because they wore clothing which reached their feet, tied up their hair in headbands and shaved their beards, in addition, because they did not exist during his time, most they did nοt exist in the past either. In 2019 a grave with Amazons in golden royal crowns was found near Russia's Voronezh.

The origin of the word is uncertain. It may be derived from an Iranian ethnonym *ha-mazan- "warriors", a word attested indirectly through a derivation, a denominal verb in Hesychius of Alexandria's gloss "ἁμαζακάραν· πολεμεῖν. Πέρσαι", where it appears together with the Indo-Iranian root *kar- "make". It may be derived from *ṇ-mṇ-gw-jon-es "manless, without husbands" has been proposed, an explanation deemed "unlikely" by Hjalmar Frisk. A further explanation proposes Iranian *ama-janah "virility-killing" as source; the Hittite researcher Friedrich Cornelius assumes that there had been the land Azzi with the capital Chajasa in the area of the Thermodon-Iris Delta on the coast of the Black Sea. He brings its residents in direct relation to the Amazons, namely based on its customs; the location of that land as well as his conclusions are controversial. Among Classical Greeks, amazon was given a folk etymology as originating from a- and mazos, "without breast", connected with an etiological tradition once claimed by Marcus Justinus who alleged that Amazons had their right breast cut off or burnt out.

There is no indication of such a practice in ancient works of art, in which the Amazons are always represented with both breasts, although one is covered. Adrienne Mayor suggests. Herodotus and Strabo placed the Amazons on the banks of the Themiscyra. Herodotus mentions that some Amazons lived in Scythia because after the Greeks defeated the Amazons in battle, they sailed away carrying in three ships as many Amazons as they had been able to take alive, but out at sea the Amazons attacked the crews and killed them these Amazons landed on Scythian lands. Strabo writes that the original home of the Amazons was in Themiscyra and the plains about Thermodon and the mountains that lie above them, but that they were driven out of these places, during his time they were said to live in the mountains above Caucasian Albania, but he states that some others, among them Metrodorus of Scepsis and Hypsicrates, say that after Themiscyra, the Amazons traveled and lived on the borders of the Gargarians, in the northerly foothills of those parts of the Caucasian Mountains which are called Ceraunian.

Aeschylus, in Prometheus Bound, places the original home of the Amazons in the country about Lake Maeotis and they moved to Themiscyra on the Thermodon. Homer had placed the Amazons much closer to the Greek world of his times, saying that the Amazons were sought and found somewhere near Lycia. Diodorus Siculus, giving the account of Dionysius of Mitylene, who, on his part, drew on Thymoetas, states that before the Amazons of the Thermodon there were, much earlier in time, the Amazons of Libya; these Amazons started from Libya passed through Egypt and Syria, stopped at the Caïcus in Aeolis, near which they founded several cities. He says, they established Mitylene a litt

101st Aviation Regiment (United States)

The 101st Aviation Regiment is an aviation regiment of the U. S. Army. Constituted 7 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 4th Light Aviation Section Activated 19 December 1950 in Korea Inactivated 5 November 1954 in Korea Redesignated 1 July 1956 as the 101st Aviation Company, assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, activated at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Reorganized and redesignated 3 December 1962 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 101st Aviation Battalion Reorganized and redesignated 16 October 1987 as the 101st Aviation, a parent regiment under the United States Army Regimental System DescriptionA silver color metal and black enamel eagle 1 1⁄8 inches in height overall, with wings elevated, between the wings a three-segmented red scroll inscribed "WINGS" at the top, "OF THE" in the middle and "EAGLE" on the lower scroll in silver letters. SymbolismThe eagle in flight represents Aviation, it alludes to the 101st Airborne Division, to which the organization is assigned. BackgroundThe distinctive unit insignia was approved for the 101st Aviation Battalion on 22 April 1965.

It was redesignated for the 101st Aviation Regiment, effective 16 October 1987, amended to update the description and symbolism. ShieldAzure, a pile lozengy at the point Argent, in chief a mullet of eight rays per fess wavy Gules and of the first. CrestOn a wreath of the colors and Azure, between two triangles Sable a horse's head Argent. Motto WINGS OF THE EAGLE. Symbolism ShieldTeal blue and white are the colors used by Aviation units. Participation by the parent unit in the actions at Whitehorse Mountain, Triangle Hill and Sniper Ridge in Korea is denoted by the three corners of the wedge shape in the center; the projection at its base represents the Kumsong Salient action. The aviation section is credited with eight campaigns in Korea, these are cited by the estoile in the colors of the Korean taeguk, further symbolizing award of the Korean Presidential Unit Citation. CrestThe crest is symbolic of the action at Triangle Hill and Sniper Ridge. BackgroundThe coat of arms was approved for the 101st Aviation Battalion on 2 March 1965.

It was redesignated for the 101st Aviation Regiment, effective 16 October 1987, amended to update the blazon and symbolism. Headquarters and Headquarters Company Constituted 15 November 1962 in the Regular Army as Company A, 101st Aviation Battalion, an element of the 101st Airborne Division Activated 3 December 1962 at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Inactivated 4 April 1979 at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Activated 30 September 1981 at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Reorganized and redesignated 16 October 1987 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, remained assigned to the 101st Airborne Division. Organic elements concurrently activated. Company A Company B Iraq 2003 – 2004 Company C Headquarters and Headquarters Company Constituted 15 November 1962 in the Regular Army as Company B, 101st Aviation Battalion, an element of the 101st Airborne Division Activated 3 December 1962 at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Reorganized and redesignated 16 October 1987 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, remained assigned to the 101st Airborne Division Inactivated 16 November 1988 at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Activated 16 August 1991 at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Company A "Renegades" Iraq 2003–2004 Company B "Reapers" Iraq 2003–2004 Company C Headquarters and Headquarters Company 1 July 1968 in the Regular Army as Company C, 101st Aviation Battalion, an element of the 101st Airborne Division Activated 20 December 1968 in Vietnam.

Reorganized and redesignated 16 October 1987 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, remained assigned to the 101st Airborne Division. Company A "Killer Spades" Afghanistan 2002 – HQ at Kandahar Airfield. Company B "Blue Max" Afghanistan Jan 2009 – Jul 2009 Company C "Widowmakers" Afghanistan Dec 2008 – Dec 2009 Headquarters and Headquarters Company Constituted 1 July 1968 in the Regular Army as Company D, 101st Aviation Battalion, an element of the 101st Airborne Division Activated 20 December 1968 in Vietnam Inactivated 30 September 1981 at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Redesignated 16 October 1987 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, activated at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, as an element of the 101st Airborne Division Company B Afghanistan Dec 2008 – Nov 2009 Company C Afghanistan Jan 2009 – Jul 2009 Afghanistan Feb 2011 – Feb 2012 Company F Afghanistan Dec 2008 – Dec 2009 Headquarters and Headquarters Company Constituted 16 September 1987 in the Regular Army as the 5th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, activated at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Headquarters and Headquarters Company Constituted 16 September 1987 in the Regular Army as the 6th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, activated at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Battalion was formed using the assets of the 123rd Aviation Battalion.

The 123rd had been reactivated on 17 December 1985 from aviation assets within the 101st Division's command groups and the 163rd Aviation Company. Headquarters and Headquarters Company Constituted 7 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 4th Light Aviation Section. Activated 19 December 1950 in Korea Inactivated 5 November 1954 in Korea Redesignated 1 July 1956 as the 101st Aviation Company, assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, activated at Fort Campbell, Kentucky Reorganized and redesignated 3 December 1962 as Headquart

CSS General Lovell

CSS General Lovell was a cotton-clad sidewheel ram of the Confederate Navy during the American Civil War. Built in 1845 as a steam tug in Cincinnati, the ship was purchased for service in the Confederacy and refitted at New Orleans, where she was converted into a cottonclad ram with cotton bales sandwiched between double pine bulkheads to protect her boilers and machinery and iron casing over her bow, she was recommissioned in March 1862, named for Major General Mansfield Lovell, commander of the defenses of New Orleans. She became part of the River Defense Fleet, under the overall command of Captain J. E. Montgomery, at New Orleans. General Lovell's conversion was completed on 22 April 1862. Under Captain B. Paris she was detached from Montgomery's main force and sent to Forts Jackson and St. Philip on the lower Mississippi to cooperate in the Confederate defense of New Orleans. There, with five other vessels of Montgomery's fleet, all under Capt. J. A. Stevenson, she joined the force under Capt. J. K. Mitchell, CSN, commanding Confederate naval forces in the lower Mississippi.

On 24 April 1862 a Union fleet under Flag Officer David Farragut, USN, ran past Forts Jackson and St. Philip on its way to capture New Orleans. General Lovell was abandoned by her crew after being set on fire to keep her from falling into Union hands. Bibliography of early American naval history This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships; the entry can be found here