SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Amunet

Amunet is a primordial goddess in ancient Egyptian religion. Her name, jmnt, is a feminine noun that means "The Hidden One", she is a member of the Ogdoad of Hermopolis, who represented aspects of the primeval existence before the creation: Amunet was paired with Amun — whose name means "The Hidden One" too, with a masculine ending — within this divine group, from the earliest known documentation. Such pairing of deities is characteristic of the religious concepts of the ancient Egyptians, being the Ogdoad itself composed by four balanced couples of deities or deified primeval concepts, it seems that Amunet may have been artificially conceived by theologians as a complement to Amun, rather than being an independent deity. The Pyramid Texts mention the beneficent shadow of Amun and Amunet: O Amun and Amunet! You pair of the gods. By at least the 12th dynasty, Amaunet was superseded as Amun's partner by Mut as cults evolved or were merged following Mentuhotep II's reunification of Egypt — but she remained locally important in the region of Thebes, where Amun was worshipped.

There she was seen as a protector of the pharaoh, playing a preeminent role in rituals associed with the coronation of the pharaoh and Sed festivals. In the Festival Hall of Thutmose III, Amaunet is shown with the fertility-god Min while leading a row of deities to visit the Pharaoh in the anniversary celebration. In spite of Amaunet's stable position as a local goddess of Egypt's most important city, her cult had little widespread following outside the Theban region. At Karnak, Amun's cult center, priests were dedicated to Amaunet's service. Amaunet was depicted as a woman wearing the Deshret "Red Crown of Lower Egypt" — as in her colossal statue placed in the Record Hall of Thutmose III at Karnak during the reign of Tutankhamun — and carrying a staff of papyrus; the exact reason for this iconography is uncertain. In some late texts from Karnak she was syncretized with Neith, although she remained a distinct deity as late as the Ptolemaic Kingdom: she is carved on the exterior wall of the Festival Hall of Thutmose III in Karnak suckling pharaoh Philip III of Macedon, who appears after his own enthronement, as a divine child.

Hart, George, A Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses, Routledge, 1986, ISBN 0-415-05909-7. Wilkinson, Richard H; the Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt, Thames & Hudson, 2003, ISBN 0-500-05120-8

Dámaso Alonso

Dámaso Alonso y Fernández de las Redondas was a Spanish poet and literary critic. Though a member of the Generation of'27, his best-known work dates from the 1940s onwards. Born in Madrid in October 22, 1898, Alonso studied Law and Literature before undertaking research at Madrid's Centro de Estudios Históricos. An enthusiastic participant in the cultural and literary life at the famous Residencia de estudiantes, Alonso wrote for the literary magazines Revista de Occidente and Los Cuatro Vientos. Alonso was to become an academic of great renown: he taught Spanish language and literature at several foreign universities, including the University of Oxford and took up a Chair at the University of Valencia between 1933 and 1939 before moving to the University of Madrid, he was elected to the Real Academia Española in 1945 and served as its Director between 1968 and 1982, when he was named Director Emeritus. Alonso's literary career can be split into two convenient blocks; as a poet his early work is considered inferior to that of his fellow poets in the Generation of'27, he himself acknowledged his limitations by referring to himself as a'poeta de rachas' or'part-time poet'.

His mature work, however Hijos de la ira, is recognised as fundamental in the literature of the post-Civil War years. Alonso's poetry is full of agnostic anguish—of a man in search of god, yet fearful of the implications were this God not to exist; as a literary critic Alonso's impact was substantial. Highlights include Poesía de San Juan de la Cruz, Poesía española: Ensayo de métodos y límites estilísticos and Estudios y ensayos gongorinos. In 1978 Alonso was awarded the Spanish literary world's highest honour. A lo divino

Bob Haigh

Robert "Bob" Haigh is an English former rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s, coached in the 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Yorkshire, at club level for Wakefield Trinity and Bradford Northern, as a second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 11 or 12, or, 13, during the era of contested scrums. Bob Haigh won caps for England while at Wakefield Trinity in 1969 against Wales, France, in 1970 against Wales, won caps for Great Britain while at Wakefield Trinity in the 1968 Rugby League World Cup against Australia, France, while at Leeds in the 1970 Rugby League World Cup against New Zealand, Australia, in 1971 against France, New Zealand. Alongside fellow Wakefield Trinity player, Ian Brooke, Bob Haigh was selected to play for Great Britain in the 1968 Rugby League World Cup in Australia and New Zealand. Alongside fellow Leeds players, John Atkinson, Tony Fisher, Syd Hynes, Mick Shoebottom and Alan Smith, Bob Haigh was selected to play for Great Britain in the 1970 Rugby League World Cup in Great Britain.

Bob Haigh won cap for Yorkshire while at Wakefield Trinity. Bob Haigh played right-second-row, i.e. number 12, in Wakefield Trinity's 21-9 victory over St. Helens in the Championship Final replay during the 1966–67 season at Station Road, Swinton on Wednesday 10 May 1967, played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in the 17-10 victory over Hull Kingston Rovers in the Championship Final during the 1967–68 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 4 May 1968, played, was man of the match winning the Harry Sunderland Trophy in Bradford Northern's 17-8 victory over Widnes in the Championship Final during the 1977–78 season. Bob Haigh played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in Wakefield Trinity's 10-11 defeat by Leeds in the 1968 Challenge Cup "Watersplash" Final during the 1967–68 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 11 May 1968, in front of a crowd of 87,100. Played right-second-row in Leeds' 7-24 defeat by Leigh in the 1971 Challenge Cup Final during the 1970–71 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 15 May 1971, in front of a crowd of 85,514, played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in the 13-16 defeat by St. Helens in the 1972 Challenge Cup Final during the 1971–72 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 13 May 1972.

Bob Haigh played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in Wakefield Trinity's 18-2 victory over Leeds in the 1964 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1964–65 season at Fartown Ground, Huddersfield on Saturday 31 October 1964, played right-second-row, i.e. number 12, in Leeds' 23-7 victory over Featherstone Rovers in the 1970 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1970–71 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Saturday 21 November 1970, played loose forward and was man of the match winning the White Rose Trophy in Bradford Northern's 18-8 victory over York in the 1978 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 28 October 1978. Bob Haigh played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in Leeds' 9-5 victory over St. Helens in the 1970 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1970–71 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Tuesday 15 December 1970. Bob Haigh played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in Leeds' 12-7 victory over Salford in the 1972–73 Player's No.6 Trophy Final during the 1972–73 season at Fartown Ground, Huddersfield on Saturday 24 March 1973.

Super League Grand Final Preview – Harry Sunderland Trophy Virtual Rugby League Hall of Fame – World Cup 1970 World Cup 1968 Don Fox forever'poor lad' who missed Ray Batten Player Profile Team of the Century Headingley Heroes Tricks of the trade Silver Jubilee RL celebrations hit Leigh Rugby Cup Final 1968