August 1924

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
01 02
03 04 05 06 07 08 09
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31  

The following events occurred in August 1924:

August 1, 1924 (Friday)[edit]

August 2, 1924 (Saturday)[edit]

August 3, 1924 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Germany observed its first memorial day on the tenth anniversary of its declaration of war on France. Outside the Reichstag a special ceremony was held as prayers for the dead were recited, church bells rang and a gun salute was fired, at the stroke of noon the entire country came to a standstill for two minutes of silence. Communists disrupted the moment of silence at the Reichstag by shouting slogans and throwing red leaflets into the air until police moved in with their clubs to restore order. Many fist fights also broke out in the crowd between various extremist political factions.[5][6]
  • Berlin Jews held a separate service for Jewish soldiers, as a Jewish preacher was forbidden from delivering a prayer in the Reichstag ceremony.[5]
  • The Soviet raid on Stołpce occurred.
  • Giuseppe Campari of Italy won the French Grand Prix.
  • Born: Leon Uris, novelist, in Baltimore, Maryland (d. 2003)
  • Died: Joseph Conrad, 66, Polish-born author

August 4, 1924 (Monday)[edit]

  • Jamaican-born political leader Marcus Garvey was indicted by a grand jury for filing an allegedly fraudulent income tax return for 1921.[7]

August 5, 1924 (Tuesday)[edit]

August 6, 1924 (Wednesday)[edit]

August 7, 1924 (Thursday)[edit]

August 8, 1924 (Friday)[edit]

August 9, 1924 (Saturday)[edit]

August 10, 1924 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Austrian police said they had uncovered a Soviet slush fund used for stirring up unrest and revolt in the Balkans.[16]
  • Born: Nancy Buckingham, gothic and romance novelist, in Bristol, England

August 11, 1924 (Monday)[edit]

August 12, 1924 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Paris newspaper Le Journal claimed to have indisputable proof that the Soviet Union had established a secret tribunal assigned with the task of creating revolutionary activity in European colonies.[20]
  • Ex-boxing champion Kid McCoy came home drunk to his Los Angeles apartment and violently murdered his live-in mistress after she told him what her friends thought of him.[21][22]
  • Born: Derek Shackleton, cricketer, in Todmorden, England (d. 2007); Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq, President of Pakistan, in Jalandhar, British India (d. 1988)

August 13, 1924 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Kid McCoy went to a shop owned by his mistress' husband looking to kill him as well, but he was not present so McCoy took 11 hostages, shooting one in the leg who tried to escape. When his intended target failed to show up, McCoy fled until police apprehended him.[21]
  • The mutiny charge against John Ross Campbell was dropped when Crown barrister Travers Humphreys appeared before the court and explained, "Since process has been issued in this case it has been represented that the object and intention of the article in question was not to endeavour to seduce men in the fighting forces from their duty and allegiance, or to induce them to disobey lawful orders, but that it was comment upon armed military force being used by the State for the suppression of industrial disputes." He also said he had been instructed not to offer any evidence upon the charge, and so Campbell was freed.[23] Attorney General Sir Patrick Hastings had gotten cold feet after learning that Campbell was an injured war veteran and that a trial before a jury was likely to fail; prosecution was also opposed by Labour government backbenchers.[9]

August 14, 1924 (Thursday)[edit]

August 15, 1924 (Friday)[edit]

August 16, 1924 (Saturday)[edit]

  • An agreement to enact the Dawes Plan was signed in London by the European powers, pending formal ratification by the respective parliaments of the countries concerned. The French and Belgians agreed to end their occupation of the Ruhr in one year's time.[26]
  • The body of Giacomo Matteotti was found hastily buried in a shallow ditch outside of Rome.[27]
  • Born: Inez Voyce, baseball player, in Rathbun, Iowa
  • Died: Roy Daugherty, 54, Old Western outlaw (killed in gunfight with lawmen)

August 17, 1924 (Sunday)[edit]

August 18, 1924 (Monday)[edit]

August 19, 1924 (Tuesday)[edit]

August 20, 1924 (Wednesday)[edit]

August 21, 1924 (Thursday)[edit]

August 22, 1924 (Friday)[edit]

August 23, 1924 (Saturday)[edit]

August 24, 1924 (Sunday)[edit]

August 25, 1924 (Monday)[edit]

August 26, 1924 (Tuesday)[edit]

August 27, 1924 (Wednesday)[edit]

August 28, 1924 (Thursday)[edit]

August 29, 1924 (Friday)[edit]

  • The German Reichstag voted 314 to 117 to accept the London protocol on the Dawes report. The vote was not expected to pass so easily but moderate right-wing factions gave it their support, giving rise to rumors that they had extracted concessions of cabinet posts in exchange for their vote. Erich Ludendorff marched out after the vote and called it "infamous".[45]
  • Edward, Prince of Wales arrived in New York City aboard the RMS Berengaria and began his visit to the United States and Canada.[46]

August 30, 1924 (Saturday)[edit]

August 31, 1924 (Sunday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 322. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  2. ^ Seldes, George (August 3, 1924). "Germans Go to London to Sign Up Dawes Plan". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  3. ^ "Yankee Airman Reaches Iceland After Battling Fog". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 3, 1924. p. 1. 
  4. ^ Chen, Wei (2013). Around the World in 69 Days. Charleston, South Carolina: Advantage Media. p. 20. ISBN 978-1-59932-402-9. 
  5. ^ a b Seldes, George (August 4, 1924). "Reds Break Up Berlin Prayer for War Dead". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  6. ^ "Berlin's First Service In Memory of War Dead Interrupted by "Reds"". The Scranton Republican. Scranton, Pennsylvania: 1. August 4, 1924. 
  7. ^ Martin, Tony (1976). Race First: The Ideological and Organizational Struggles of Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association. Majority Press. p. 187. ISBN 0-912469-23-4. 
  8. ^ Steele, John (August 6, 1924). "Marx Digests Allies' Plans; Reports Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  9. ^ a b Dobson, Jeremy (2009). Why Do the People Hate Me So?: The Strange Interlude Between the Two Great Wars in the Britain of Stanley Baldwin. Leicester: Troubador Publishing Ltd. pp. 102–103. ISBN 978-1-84876-239-8. 
  10. ^ "Disloyalty. Editor Arrested". Hawera & Normanby Star. Hawera: 5. August 7, 1924. 
  11. ^ Jeffrey, Keith. The Secret History of MI6: 1909–1949. New York: The Penguin Press. ISBN 978-1-101-44346-0. 
  12. ^ Holston, Kim R. (2013). Movie Roadshows: A History and Filmography of Reserved-Seat Limited Showings, 1911–1973. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-7864-6062-5. 
  13. ^ a b c d "Chronology 1924". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  14. ^ "Truly a great arena". BBC Sport. October 1, 2000. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  15. ^ Steele, John (August 10, 1924). "Tommy Gibbons Just Ruins Another British Ring Hope". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. Part 2 p. 1. 
  16. ^ Clayton, John (August 11, 1924). "Austrian Police Reveal Red Plot to Stir Balkans". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12. 
  17. ^ "Calvin Coolidge Biography". Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  18. ^ "President Coolidge, Taken on the White House Ground (1924)". Internet Archive. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  19. ^ Parker, Stanley (August 13, 1924). "Ten Die as Riots Against British Flare in Sudan". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 14. 
  20. ^ "Reds Plot to Rip Colonies from France, Britain". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 13, 1924. p. 10. 
  21. ^ a b Rasmussen, Cecilia (April 14, 1997). "The Violent Life of Boxer Kid McCoy". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  22. ^ Shaffer, George (August 14, 1924). "Kid McCoy Slays Divorcee". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  23. ^ "The Police Court Proceedings". The Mercury. Hobart: 7. October 10, 1924. 
  24. ^ "Flood Kills 14,000; Huge Famine Near". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 14, 1924. p. 1. 
  25. ^ Kinsley, Philip (August 15, 1924). "Coolidge Sounds Keynote". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1 and 4. 
  26. ^ Steele, John (August 17, 1924). "Europe Signs Dawes Pact". Chicago Daily Tribune. pp. 1–2. 
  27. ^ Palla, Marco (2000). Mussolini and Fascism. Northampton, Massachusetts: Interlink Books. p. 41. ISBN 1-56656-340-2. 
  28. ^ a b "Two Priests and Two Cops Slain as Burmese Riot". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 18, 1924. p. 12. 
  29. ^ Wales, Henry (August 18, 1924). "French Quit German Towns". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  30. ^ "U.S. Flyers Plane Damage". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 19, 1924. p. 1. 
  31. ^ a b Hannon, Michael (May 2010). "Leopold and Loeb Case (1924)" (PDF). University of Minnesota Law Library. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  32. ^ Evans, Arthur (August 20, 1924). "Dawes Raps La Folletteism". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  33. ^ "Senator Dial and Foe Held for Fighting". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 21, 1924. p. 1. 
  34. ^ Paxton, Bill (2009). The Fearless Harry Greb: Biography of a Tragic Hero of Boxing. McFarland. ISBN 978-1-4766-1383-3. 
  35. ^ "U.S. Airmen in Greenland". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 22, 1924. p. 1. 
  36. ^ "Davis Opens Campaign Attack on K.K.K. and G.O.P.". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 23, 1924. p. 1. 
  37. ^ Curran, John. Agatha Christie's Secret Notebooks (p. 260). HarperCollins, 2009; ISBN 978-0-00-731056-2
  38. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (August 23, 1924). "Radical Riots Block Dawes Plan in Berlin". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5. 
  39. ^ Kinsley, Philip (August 24, 1924). "Dawes Stamps Un-American Brand on Klan". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  40. ^ "Prince of Wales". Hawera & Normanby Star. Hawera: 5. August 25, 1924. 
  41. ^ "Marx Will O.K. Dawes Plan; May Force Elections". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 26, 1924. p. 14. 
  42. ^ "'Ku Klux Klan is Patriotic Body,' Ford Asserts". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 27, 1924. p. 9. 
  43. ^ "Colored Photos Wired to N.Y. from Chicago". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 28, 1924. p. 1. 
  44. ^ "The Iron Horse". Silent Era. December 8, 2009. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  45. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (August 30, 1924). "Germans O.K. Dawes Plan by Big Majority". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  46. ^ Wells, Linton (August 30, 1924). "Prince on U.S. Soil; it's Just 'Holiday Visit'". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  47. ^ "Pact Signed in London". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 31, 1924. p. 1. 
  48. ^ "Wild Welcome for Wales on Coolidge Visit". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 31, 1924. p. 1. 
  49. ^ Lennox, Doug (2009). Now You Know: Big Book of Sports. Toronto: Magnetawan Communications, Inc. and Dundurn Press Ltd. pp. 232–233. ISBN 1-55488-454-3. 
  50. ^ Pierson, Joseph (September 1, 1924). "Airmen Hop to Home Shore". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.