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Belk

Belk, Inc. is an American department store chain founded in 1888 by William Henry Belk in Monroe, North Carolina, with nearly 300 locations in 16 states. Belk stores and Belk.com offer apparel, accessories, home furnishings and wedding registry. Belk was founded in 1888 by William Henry Belk in North Carolina, outside Charlotte; the store was first called "New York Racket" and "Belk Brothers", after Belk made his brother, physician Dr. John Belk, his partner. Belk bought in volume to pass savings on and sold at fixed prices a unusual practice. By 1909, the company had moved its headquarters to Charlotte and built a huge flagship store on Trade and Tryon Streets in downtown Charlotte, which would remain the company's headquarters until it was closed in 1988 to make way for the construction of what is now Bank of America Corporate Center; the business grew relying on "bargain sales" and advertising to grow the business and increase its influence throughout the South. Beginning in 1921 with the Leggett Bros. stores of South Boston, the Belk company grew by investing in various partnerships with local merchandisers in nearby markets.

Belk's growth out of the Southeast was pushed by Earl Jones Sr and the Belk-Jones brand that opened the first Belk west of the Mississippi in 1947. The Jones family and the Belk-Jones brand continued to grow Belk's westward expansion; this complex story is chronicled in a book published by Belk – Belk, Inc.: The Company and the Family That Built It – about the evolution of the company. This structure allowed Belk to expand and permitted local variation, but resulted in a diluted brand identity since most stores were co-branded. By the 1990s, the system had become untenable: stores were held by over 350 separate legal entities, Belk family members disagreed about whether to maintain or sweep away the structure, some local partners threatened stability by selling their stakes. For example, the heirs of John G. Parks, majority owners of the Parks-Belk chain, sold their interests to Proffitt's, a competitor; the Belks sold their stake as well, although Belk would purchase the stores back as part of its acquisition of the entire Proffitt's chain.

When Proffitt's made an offer for the Leggett family's stake, which included 42 stores comprising about 20 percent of Belk's revenue and Tom Belk were forced to respond by forming a new company in 1996 that bought the Leggetts out. This move accelerated the slow trend of consolidating the store's ownership under the Belks. In 1998, the company formed a new entity that merged the 112 remaining Belk companies, swapping the existing partners' local interests for shares in the combined entity; the same year, Belk made a deal to acquire seven Dillard's locations in exchange for nine of theirs so that each could build on regional strengths. Belk eliminated the dual brands, completing the process with a chain-wide Belk rebranding in the fall of 2010. On July 5, 2005, Belk completed the purchase of 47 Proffitt's and McRae's department stores from Saks Incorporated in Tennessee and Mississippi. Belk converted the 39 Proffitt's and McRae's stores to the Belk nameplate on March 8, 2006. Just over a year Belk purchased 38 Parisian department stores from Saks on October 2, 2006.

Although most Parisian stores were converted to the Belk nameplate since September 12, 2007, some duplicate Parisian stores were closed, as at The Mall at Barnes Crossing in Tupelo, Richland Mall, Columbiana Centre in Columbia, South Carolina, Citadel Mall in Charleston, South Carolina. Four Parisian stores in Indiana and Ohio, plus a store under construction at the time in Michigan, were sold by Belk to The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc. Integrating the larger, more upscale Parisian stores proved a challenge for Belk, spurred the creation of the company's flagship strategy. During the fourth quarter of 2005, Belk completed the sale of its private-label credit card division, Belk National Bank, to GE MoneyBank. Consumers were issued new Belk credit cards replacing the old ones issued by BNB. All new Belk cards are now issued by GE MoneyBank, now known as Synchrony Bank. On October 3, 2010, the News & Observer reported. On October 12 at SouthPark Mall, Belk introduced the new logo, its first since 1967.

The chain embarked on a $70 million marketing campaign that replaced the old slogan "All for You!" with a new slogan, "Modern. Southern. Style." Sixty stores got new signs in the first phase, with the remainder getting new signs throughout 2011. Advertisements for Belk & Co. jewelry continue to use a variation of the old logo. On April 3, 2015, news reports revealed that Belk was exploring "strategic alternatives," including a possible sale of the company. On August 24, 2015, Belk announced that it had entered into a definitive merger agreement to be acquired by New York-based private equity firm Sycamore Partners; the acquisition was completed on December 10, 2015. On June 29, 2016, Belk announced that effective as of July 5, Lisa Harper, CEO of Hot Topic, would replace Tim Belk as CEO of Belk; this would be the first time since the founding of the company that a non-Belk family member would head the company. The chain operates 293 stores in 16 states, generating $4 billion in sales in 2014; the state of North Carolina leads in the number of Belk stores with 65 stores followed by Georgia and South Carolina with 45 and 35 stores respectfully.

Its typical store covers 100,000 to 180,000 square feet. 50% of its stores are in regional malls, another 40% in open-air community or retail parks

Ihor Bodrov

Ihor Bodrov is a Ukrainian sprinter. Bodrov began his sport career with the 34th International Children's Games held in Plock, Poland in 2002; when he took the gold medal in the 100 m, his result was 11.61. He finished fourth in the 200 m at the 2006 World Junior Championships setting his personal best at 21.17 seconds. He competed at the 2008 World Indoor Championships and the 2008 Olympic Games without reaching the final. At the 2009 European Athletics U23 Championships he placed third over 200 m, improving his personal record to 20.61. At the 2010 European Team Championships he finished fourth at 20.77. He won a gold medal in the 4×100m relay at the 2013 Summer Universiade, where he placed fifth in the individual 100 m with a time of 10.29 seconds. Bodrov is trained by his parents Valery Bodrov and Nadya Bodrova, both being former international runners. Nadya competed in two Olympics, coached by her husband. Hence Bodrov grew up on the stadium and can not recall when he started training, he graduated in coaching from the Kharkiv State Academy of Physical Culture and in law from the Sumy State University.

Ihor Bodrov at World Athletics Profile Igor Bodrov from www.all-athletics.com Profile Igor Bodrov from www.trackandfield.ru Igor Bodrov from kharkov-la.ru

Atlantic Union

Atlantic Union was the most common name for the proposal advanced by journalist Clarence Streit in 1939, to unite the world's leading democratic nations into a federal union, in much the way the thirteen states united in 1789 under the U. S. Constitution. For many years an Atlantic Union Resolution was introduced every session in the U. S. Congress, by Rep. Paul Findley, Donald Fraser, Morris Udall as the lead co-sponsors, to call an "Atlantic Convention" which its proponents hoped would draft a constitution to be submitted for ratification to the countries represented. In 1964 the resolution passed and the convention was held, but President Lyndon B. Johnson, not a supporter of the concept, did not appoint supporters of federation as the U. S. delegates, so nothing came of the convention except a broadly-worded resolution calling for "greater cooperation". The idea of Atlantic Union had its origin in the fertile brain of an Englishman named Cecil Rhodes. To this end he established the Rhodes Foundation, providing for the education in England of bright young Americans.

In 1939, a Rhodes Scholar named Clarence Streit wrote a book called Union Now, which advocated a gradual approach to final world union by way of regional unions, starting with the union between the US and Britain. Committees were set up all over America, Mr. Streit reported that over two million Americans had signed petitions asking for union with Britain. In Streit's own words, Atlantic Union, now expanded to include Western Europe, was the first step towards total world government:" It proclaimed the need of world government and insisted that no country needed this more urgently than the United States. Streit, a close associate of Communists and socialists all his adult life, has no hostility towards collectivism, he said in Union Now: - Democracy not only allows mankind to choose between capitalism and collectivism, but it includes Marxist governments." In his pamphlets Streit asks the question:" Does the rise of socialism in some Western European democracies prevent our federating with them?"

He answers with an emphatic "No!" In March 1949, Federal Union set up a political-action unit called the Atlantic Union Committee. The first president of this Committee was former Supreme Court justice Owen J. Roberts, who said he considers national sovereignty a " silly shibboleth." The work for Atlantic Union is being worked towards by the Streit Council. Community of Democracies European Union North American Union United States of the West North Atlantic Treaty Organisation Union Now, Clarence K. Streit. Online copy Freedom's Frontier — Atlantic Union Now, by Clarence K. Streit. Association to Unite the Democracies Streit Council