Benjamin Curtis Porter

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Benjamin Curtis Porter
Born(1843-08-27)August 27, 1843
DiedApril 2, 1908(1908-04-02) (aged 64)
Spouse(s)
Parent(s)Charles Porter
Julia Curtis Porter

Benjamin Curtis Porter (August 27, 1843 – April 2, 1908) was an American artist.[1]

Early life[edit]

Porter was born at Melrose, Massachusetts on August 27, 1843, he was the son of Charles Porter and Julia (née Curtis) Porter.[2] Porter came from an "old Massachusetts family whose scions have been good citizens, soldiers, divines and lawyers in America."[3]

He was a pupil of Dr. Rimmer and Albion Harris Bicknell in Boston and of the Paris schools after traveling extensively in America and Europe.[4]

Career[edit]

Porter's 1888 portrait of Emily Thorn (née Vanderbilt) Sloane.

Porter, who began his career as a figure painter, eventually devoted himself to portraiture entirely,[4] he was elected an associate of the National Academy of Design, New York, in 1878, and a full academician in 1880.[5][6] Porter opened his studio, at 3 Washington Square North,[3] in New York in 1880.[1] Today, he is best known for his portraits.[5]

Aside from study at Harvard, Porter's primary education seems to have consisted of several trips to Europe in 1872, 1875, 1878, and 1881. Cities which particularly interested him were Paris and Venice. By the early 1870s, Porter had established a successful portrait studio in Boston, his mark was made in New York in 1877 when a group of works he exhibited at the NAD Annual caused something of a critical sensation. He was soon elected to the Academy's membership (although he had to wait until 1903 to be elected to the Society of American Artists), and in 1883 he opened a New York studio, dividing his time for several years between Manhattan and Boston, his summers were usually spent in Newport, Rhode Island.[7]

Personal life[edit]

In 1887, Porter married Mary Louise Clark of Bridgeport, Connecticut.[7] In 1892, both Benjamin and his wife were included in Ward McAllister's list of "Four Hundred", purported to be an index of New York's best families, published in The New York Times.[8] Conveniently, 400 was the number of people that could fit into Mrs. Astor's ballroom.[9] Porter was a member of the Tuxedo Club and the National Arts Tavern Club in Boston.[3]

He died at his residence, 22 West 11th Street in New York City, on April 2, 1908,[1] his funeral was held at the Church of the Ascension on Fifth Avenue and West 10th Street.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Benjamin C. Porter" (PDF). The New York Times. April 3, 1908. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  2. ^ a b "DIED. Porter" (PDF). The New York Times. April 3, 1908. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  3. ^ a b c The Successful American. Press Biographical Company. 1902. p. 647. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  4. ^ a b Johnson, Rossiter (1904). The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans. Boston: The Biographical Society. p. 382. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  5. ^ a b  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Porter, Benjamin Curtis". Encyclopædia Britannica. 22 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 113.
  6. ^ public domain Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1922). "Porter, Benjamin Curtis". Encyclopædia Britannica. 32 (12th ed.). London & New York. p. 128.
  7. ^ a b "Benjamin Curtis Porter 1843/45 - 1908". www.nationalacademy.org. National Academy Museum. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  8. ^ McAllister, Ward (16 February 1892). "THE ONLY FOUR HUNDRED | WARD M'ALLISTER GIVES OUT THE OFFICIAL LIST. HERE ARE THE NAMES, DON'T YOU KNOW, ON THE AUTHORITY OF THEIR GREAT LEADER, YOU UNDER- STAND, AND THEREFORE GENUINE, YOU SEE" (PDF). The New York Times. Retrieved 26 March 2017.
  9. ^ Keister, Lisa A. (2005). Getting Rich: America's New Rich and How They Got That Way. Cambridge University Press. p. 36. ISBN 9780521536677. Retrieved 20 October 2017.

External links[edit]

Media related to Benjamin Curtis Porter at Wikimedia Commons