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Brian Lara

Brian Charles Lara, is a Trinidadian former international cricketer acknowledged as one of the greatest batsmen of all time. He topped the Test batting rankings on several occasions and holds several cricketing records, including the record for the highest individual score in first-class cricket, with 501 not out for Warwickshire against Durham at Edgbaston in 1994, the only quintuple hundred in first-class cricket history. Lara holds the record for the highest individual score in a Test innings after scoring 400 not out against England at Antigua in 2004. Lara shares the test record of scoring the highest number of runs in a single over in a Test match, when he scored 28 runs off an over by Robin Peterson of South Africa in 2003. Lara's match-winning performance of 153 not out against Australia in Bridgetown, Barbados in 1999 has been rated by Wisden as the second best batting performance in the history of Test cricket, next only to the 270 runs scored by Sir Donald Bradman in The Ashes Test match of 1937.

Muttiah Muralitharan, rated as the greatest Test match bowler by Wisden Cricketers' Almanack, the highest wicket-taker in both Test cricket and in One Day Internationals, has hailed Lara as his toughest opponent among all batsmen in the world. Lara was awarded the Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World awards in 1994 and 1995 and is one of only three cricketers to receive the prestigious BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year, the other two being Sir Garfield Sobers and Shane Warne. Brian Lara was appointed honorary member of the Order of Australia on 27 November 2009. On 14 September 2012 he was inducted to the ICC's Hall of Fame at the awards ceremony held in Colombo, Sri Lanka as a 2012–13 season inductee along with Australians Glenn McGrath and former England women all-rounder Enid Bakewell. In 2013, Lara received Honorary Life Membership of the MCC becoming the 31st West Indian to receive the honor. Brian Lara is popularly nicknamed as "The Prince of Port of Spain" or "The Prince".

He has the dubious distinction of playing in the second highest number of test matches in which his team was on the losing side, just behind Shivnarine Chanderpaul. Brian is one of eleven siblings, his father Bunty and one of his older sisters Agnes Cyrus enrolled him in the local Harvard Coaching Clinic at the age of six for weekly coaching sessions on Sundays. As a result, Lara had a early education in correct batting technique. Lara's first school was St. Joseph's Roman Catholic primary, he went to San Juan Secondary School, located on Moreau Road, Lower Santa Cruz. A year at fourteen years old, he moved on to Fatima College where he started his development as a promising young player under cricket coach Mr. Harry Ramdass. Aged 14, he amassed 745 runs in the schoolboys' league, with an average of 126.16 per innings, which earned him selection for the Trinidad national under-16 team. When he was 15 years old, he played in his first West Indian under-19 youth tournament and that same year, Lara represented West Indies in Under-19 cricket.

1987 was a breakthrough year for Lara, when in the West Indies Youth Championships he scored 498 runs breaking the record of 480 by Carl Hooper set the previous year. He captained the tournament-winning Trinidad and Tobago, who profited from a match-winning 116 from Lara. In January 1988, Lara made his first-class debut for Trinidad and Tobago in the Red Stripe Cup against Leeward Islands. In his second first-class match he made 92 against a Barbados attack containing Joel Garner and Malcolm Marshall, two greats of West Indies teams. In the same year, he captained the West Indies team in Australia for the Bicentennial Youth World Cup where the West Indies reached the semi-finals; that year, his innings of 182 as captain of the West Indies Under-23s against the touring Indian team further elevated his reputation. His first selection for the full West Indies team followed in due course, but coincided with the death of his father and Lara withdrew from the team. In 1989, he captained a West Indies B Team in Zimbabwe and scored 145.

In 1990, at the age of 20, Lara became Trinidad and Tobago's youngest-ever captain, leading them that season to victory in the one-day Geddes Grant Shield. It was in 1990 that he made his belated Test debut for West Indies against Pakistan, scoring 44 and 5, he had made his ODI debut a month earlier against Pakistan, scoring 11. In January 1993, Lara scored Australia in Sydney. This, his maiden Test century in his fifth Test, was the turning point of the series as West Indies won the final two Tests to win the series 2–1. Lara went on to name his daughter Sydney after scoring 277 at SCG. Lara holds several world records for high scoring, he has the highest individual score in both first-class Test cricket. Lara amassed his world record 501 in 474 minutes off only 427 balls, he hit 308 in boundaries. His partners were Trevor Penney, Paul Smith and Keith Piper. Earlier in that season Lara scored six centuries in seven innings while playing for Warwickshire, he is the only man to have reclaimed the Test record score, having scored 375 against England in 1994, a record that stood until Matthew Hayden's 380 against Zimbabwe in 2003.

His 400 not out made him the second player to score two Test triple-centuries, the second to score two first-class quadruple-centuries. He has scored nine double centuries in Test cricket, third after Bradman's twelve and Kumar Sangakkar

International Monster Truck Hall of Fame

The International Monster Truck Hall of Fame, based in Auburn, Indiana, is a shrine to the best drivers in the history of monster truck competition. The Hall is part of the Kruse Carriage Museum; the Hall displays monster trucks from the earliest days of the competition. These were the drivers recognized as the "originals" of the sport Bob ChandlerBigfoot Jeff Dane – King Kong Dan Degrasso – Beast Jack Willman – Taurus Everett JasmerUSA-1 Fred Shafer – Bear Foot Jim Kramer – Bigfoot Mike Welch – Mike Welch Motorsports George Carpenter – Promoter, Safety Director, Tech Official Dennis AndersonGrave Digger Pablo Huffaker – Jus Showin Off, Grave Digger Gary PorterCarolina Crusher, Grave Digger, Spider-Man Allen Pezo – Predator racing Dan Patrick – Patrick Enterprises, Samson Scott Stephens – King Krunch, Coors Brewer, Auto Value Army Armstrong – TV/Live Event Personality/Motorsports Radio Michael Vaters – Black Stallion, Vaters Motorsports Kirk Dabney – Blue Thunder, Extreme Overkill, Monster Patrol Jon Breen – Mad Dog Diehl Wilson – Virginia Giant Andy Brass – Bigfoot Billy Joe Miles – President at TNT Motorsports David Morris – Equalizer Gene Patterson – Stomper Bully, Snake Bite Alan Tura – Goliath, G-Force Bob George – Founder of USHRA/SRO Charlie Pauken – Excaliber, Grave Digger, Monster Mutt Jerry Richmond – Terminator, Weapon 1, Lethal Weapon, Overkill Terry Woodcock – Unnamed and Untamed, Generation X Gary Cook – Creator of Equalizer Jeff Bainter – Driver of Captain USA, High Voltage/Hot Stuff Jeeps Mike Galloway – Retired Television/Live Event Personality Seth Doulton – Owner of Golden State Promotions Jim Reis – Retired driver at Golden State Promotions Gary Bauer – Driver of Lon-Ranger, Screamin Demon Marty Garza – Founder of Overkill Monster Truck racing Jack Koberna – Driver of Grave Digger 4, Savage Beast and Tuff-E-Nuff Mike Nickell – Retired Driver of Excaliber Dan Runte- Driver of Bigfoot, Snake Bite sometimes under the name Rick Rattler Aaron Polburn-Founder of Thunder Nationals/Monster Nationals Cliff Starbird- Monster Vette, Wild Stang, Frankenstein Jesse Birgy- Driver of Playn For Keeps

String quintet repertoire

Among the repertoire for the standard string quintet are the following works: Ordering is by surname of composer. String quintets with 2 violins, 2 violas and cello Arnold Bax String Quintet in G Lyrical Interlude Ludwig van Beethoven String Quintet, Op. 29 Johannes Brahms String Quintet No. 1 in F major, Op. 88 String Quintet No. 2 in G major, Op. 111 Frank Bridge String Quintet in E minor, H 7 Benjamin Britten Phantasy Quintet Anton Bruckner String Quintet in F major, WAB 112 Intermezzo for String Quintet Antonín Dvořák String Quintet in A minor, Op. 1 String Quintet in E-flat major, Op. 97 Felix Mendelssohn String Quintet No. 1 String Quintet No. 2 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart K. 174 in B-flat K. 406/516b in C minor K. 515 in C K. 516 in G minor K. 593 in D K. 614 in E-flat Ralph Vaughan Williams Phantasy Quintet String quintets with 2 violins, viola and 2 cellos David Baker Two Cello String Quintet Violoncello and string quartet Ludwig van Beethoven Kreutzer Sonata for String Quintet Luigi Boccherini String Quintet Op. 10 No. 1 in A major, G 265 String Quintet Op. 10 No. 2 in E flat major, G 266 String Quintet Op. 10 No. 3 in C minor, G 267 String Quintet Op. 10 No. 4 in C major, G 268 String Quintet Op. 10 No. 5 in E flat major, G 269 String Quintet Op. 10 No. 6 in D major, G 270 String Quintet Op. 11 No. 1 in B flat major, G 271 String Quintet Op. 11 No. 2 in A major, G 272 String Quintet Op. 11 No. 3 in C major, G 273 String Quintet Op. 11 No. 4 in F minor, G 274 String Quintet Op. 11 No. 5 in E major, G 275 String Quintet Op. 11 No. 6 in D major, G 276 String Quintet Op. 13 No. 1 in E flat major, G 277 String Quintet Op. 13 No. 2 in C major, G 278 String Quintet Op. 13 No. 3 in F major, G 279 String Quintet Op. 13 No. 4 in D minor, G 280 String Quintet Op. 13 No. 5 in A major, G 281 String Quintet Op. 13 No. 6 in E major, G 282 String Quintet Op. 18 No. 1 in C minor, G 283 String Quintet Op. 18 No. 2 in D major, G 284 String Quintet Op. 18 No. 3 in E flat major, G 285 String Quintet Op. 18 No. 4 in C major, G 286 String Quintet Op. 18 No. 5 in D minor, G 287 String Quintet Op. 18 No. 6 in E major, G 288 String Quintet Op. 20 No. 1 in E flat major, G 289 String Quintet Op. 20 No. 2 in B flat major, G 290 String Quintet Op. 20 No. 3 in F major, G 291 String Quintet Op. 20 No. 4 in G major, G 292 String Quintet Op. 20 No. 5 in D minor, G 293 String Quintet Op. 20 No. 6 in A minor, G 294 String Quintet Op. 25 No. 1 in D minor, G 295 String Quintet Op. 25 No. 2 in E flat major, G 296 String Quintet Op. 25 No. 3 in A major, G 297 String Quintet Op. 25 No. 4 in C major, G 298 String Quintet Op. 25 No. 5 in D major, G 299 String Quintet Op. 25 No. 6 in A minor, G 300 String Quintet Op. 27 No. 1 in A major, G 301 String Quintet Op. 27 No. 2 in G major, G 302 String Quintet Op. 27 No. 3 in E minor, G 303 String Quintet Op. 27 No. 4 in E flat major, G 304 String Quintet Op. 27 No. 5 in G minor, G 305 String Quintet Op. 27 No. 6 in B minor, G 306 String Quintet Op. 28 No. 1 in F major, G 307 String Quintet Op. 28 No. 2 in A major, G 308 String Quintet Op. 28 No. 3 in E flat major, G 309 String Quintet Op. 28 No. 4 in C major, G 310 String Quintet Op. 28 No. 5 in D minor, G 311 String Quintet Op. 28 No. 6 in B flat major, G 312 String Quintet Op. 29 No. 1 in D major, G 313 String Quintet Op. 29 No. 2 in C minor, G 314 String Quintet Op. 29 No. 3 in F major, G 315 String Quintet Op. 29 No. 4 in A major, G 316 String Quintet Op. 29 No. 5 in E flat major, G 317 String Quintet Op. 29 No. 6 in G minor, G 318 String Quintet Op. 30 No. 1 in B flat major, G 319 String Quintet Op. 30 No. 2 in A minor, G 320 String Quintet Op. 30 No. 3 in C major, G 321 String Quintet Op. 30 No. 4 in E flat major, G 322 String Quintet Op. 30 No. 5 in E minor, G 323 String Quintet Op. 30 No. 6 in C major, G 324 String Quintet Op. 31 No. 1 in E flat major, G 325 String Quintet Op. 31 No. 2 in G major, G 326 String Quintet Op. 31 No. 3 in B flat major, G 327 String Quintet Op. 31 No. 4 in C minor, G 328 String Quintet Op. 31 No. 5 in A major, G 329 String Quintet Op. 31 No. 6 in F major, G 330 String Quintet Op. 36 No. 1 in E flat major, G 331 String Quintet Op. 36 No. 2 in D major, G 332 String Quintet Op. 36 No. 3 in G major, G 333 String Quintet Op. 36 No. 4 in A minor, G 334 String Quintet Op. 36 No. 5 in G minor, G 335 String Quintet Op. 36 No. 6 in F major, G 336 String Quintet Op. 39 No. 1 in B flat major, G 337 String Quintet Op. 39 No. 2 in F major, G 338 String Quintet Op. 39 No. 3 in D major, G 339 String Quintet Op. 40 No. 1 in A major, G 340 String Quintet Op. 40 No. 2 in D major, G 341 String Quintet Op. 40 No. 3 in D major, G 342 String Quintet Op. 40 No. 4 in C major, G 343 String Quintet Op. 40 No. 5 in E minor, G 344 String Quintet Op. 40 No. 6 in B flat major, G 345 String Quintet Op. 41 No. 1 in E flat major, G 346 String Quintet Op. 41 No. 2 in F major, G 347 String Quintet Op. 42 No. 1 in F minor, G 348 String Quintet Op. 42 No. 2 in C major, G 349 String Quintet Op. 42 No. 3 in B minor, G 350 String Quintet Op. 42 No. 4 in G minor, G 351 String Quintet Op. 43 No. 1 in E flat major, G 352 String Quintet Op. 43 No. 2 in D major, G 353 String Quintet Op. 43 No. 3 in F major, G 354 String Quintet Op. 45 No. 1 in C minor, G 355 String Quintet Op. 45 No. 2 in A major, G 356 String Quintet Op. 45 No. 3 in B flat major, G 357 String Quintet Op. 45 No. 4 in C major, G 358 String Quintet Op. 46 No. 1 in B flat major, G 359 String Quintet Op. 46 No. 2 in D minor, G 360 String Quintet Op. 46 No. 3 in C major, G 361 String Quintet Op. 46 No. 4 in G minor, G 362 String Quintet Op. 46 No. 5 in F major, G 363 String Quintet Op. 46 No. 6 in E flat major, G 364 String Quintet Op. 49 No. 1 in D major, G 365 String Quintet Op. 49 No. 2 in B flat major, G 366 String Qu

Empress Xiaoxianchun

Empress Xiaoxianchun, of the Manchu Bordered Yellow Banner Fuca clan, was a consort of the Qianlong Emperor. She was one year his junior. Empress Xiaoxianchun's personal name was not recorded in history. Father: Lirongbao, served as a third rank military official of Chahar, held the title of a first class duke Paternal grandfather: Mishan, served as the Minister of Revenue from 1669–1675 Paternal uncle: Maci Mother: Lady Gioro Seven elder brothers and two younger brothers Ninth younger brother: Fuheng One younger sister The future Empress Xiaoxianchun was born on the 22nd day of the second lunar month in the 51st year of the reign of the Kangxi Emperor, which translates to 28 March 1712 in the Gregorian calendar. On 3 September 1727, Lady Fuca married Hongli, the fourth son of the Yongzheng Emperor, became his primary consort, she moved into the Palace of Eternal Spring in the western part of the Forbidden City. She gave birth on 3 November 1728 to Hongli's first daughter, who would die prematurely on 14 February 1730, on 9 August 1730 to his second son, who would die prematurely on 23 November 1738, on 31 July 1731 to his third daughter, Princess Hejing of the First Rank.

The Yongzheng Emperor died on 8 October 1735 and was succeeded by Hongli, enthroned as the Qianlong Emperor. On 23 January 1738, Lady Fuca, as the emperor's primary consort, was instated as Empress. In the Draft History of Qing, Lady Fuca is described as a virtuous person, she looked after the Qianlong Emperor and the people in the palace, served her role as Empress well. She was favoured by the emperor, it is said that Lady Fuca did not like spending money for her own good. Instead of wearing jewellery, she would wear artificial flowers in her hair; the Qianlong Emperor once told her a story that Manchus were too poor to make their own pouches from cloth and had to settle for simple deer hide instead. She made one for him, he was touched by the gift. Lady Fuca made other pouches for him. Lady Fuca took her duties when it came to Confucian rituals; as head of the women's quarters in the palace, she supervised the emperor's consorts when performing a ritual. One of these was a rite concerning sericulture, presided over by the Empress.

This rite, practised since the Zhou dynasty, was restored during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor. For the purpose of this rite, a sericulture altar was constructed in 1742. In 1744, a new Altar to Sericulture was completed at Lady Fuca's urging; that year, Lady Fuca became the first empress in the Qing dynasty to lead the women in the palace in these rites. They made offerings of mulberry and presented them to silkworm cocoons, all of them working industriously; the whole rite was painted on four scrolls in 1751 in memory of Lady Fuca. On 27 May 1746, Lady Fuca gave birth to the emperor's seventh son, who would die prematurely on 29 January 1748. In 1748, during one of the Qianlong Emperor's southern tours, she became ill and died on 8 April. On 2 December 1752, she was interred in the Yu Mausoleum of the Eastern Qing tombs, it is said that the Qianlong Emperor visited her grave with wistful longing, remained heartbroken to the end of his days. During the reign of the Kangxi Emperor: Lady Fuca During the reign of the Yongzheng Emperor: Primary consort During the reign of the Qianlong Emperor: Empress Empress Xiaoxian During the reign of the Jiaqing Emperor: Empress Xiaoxianchun As primary consort: The Qianlong Emperor's first daughter Yonglian, the Qianlong Emperor's second son Princess Hejing of the First Rank, the Qianlong Emperor's third daughter Married Septeng Baljur of the Khorchin Borjigit clan in April/May 1747 As Empress: Yongcong, the Qianlong Emperor's seventh son Portrayed by Shally Tsang in Take Care, Your Highness!

Portrayed by Chan Fuk-sang in The Rise and Fall of Qing Dynasty Portrayed by Chen Yi in Jiangshan Weizhong Portrayed by Joyce Tang in The Prince's Shadow Portrayed by Yuan Yi in Empresses in the Palace Portrayed by Qin Lan in Story of Yanxi Palace Portrayed by Dong Jie in Ruyi's Royal Love in the Palace Ranks of imperial consorts in China#Qing Royal and noble ranks of the Qing dynasty Ho, Chuimei. Splendors of China's Forbidden City: The Glorious Reign of Emperor Qianlong. Merrell. ISBN 1858942039. Kutcher, Norman. "The Death of the Xiaoxian Empress: Bureaucratic Betrayals and the Crises of Eighteenth-Century Chinese Rule". The Journal of Asian Studies. 56: 708–725. Doi:10.2307/2659606. Naquin, Susan. Peking: Temples and City Life, 1400–1900. University of California Press. Wan, Yi. Daily Life in the Forbidden City: The Qing Dynasty, 1644-1912. Viking. ISBN 0670811645. Zhao, Erxun. Draft History of Qing

Brazil–Mozambique relations

Brazil–Mozambique relations refers to the diplomatic relations between Brazil and Mozambique. Both nations are members of the Community of Portuguese Language Countries. Both Brazil and Mozambique were united for three hundred years as part of the Portuguese Empire; as part of the Portuguese Empire, Brazil received thousands of Mozambicans who arrived to the country as slaves. From 1815-1822, Mozambique was administered by Brazil during the Transfer of the Portuguese Court to Brazil. From September 1964 - September 1974, Mozambique was at war with Portugal during its war of independence. In December 1973, Brazil voted in favor of the United Nations Resolution 3117 on the elimination of colonialism in Southern Africa. On 25 June 1975, Mozambique obtained its independence. On 15 November 1975, Brazil established diplomatic relations with Mozambique. In March 1976, Brazil opened an embassy in the Mozambican capital of Maputo and in January 1998, Mozambique reciprocated the gesture by opening an embassy in Brasília.

In 2000, Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso paid an official visit to Mozambique and attended the 3rd summit of the Community of Portuguese Language Countries being held in the Mozambican capital. In 2001, Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano paid an official visit to Brazil. Since there have been several high level visits between leaders of both nations. High-level visits from Brazil to Mozambique President Fernando Henrique Cardoso President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva President Dilma Rousseff High-level visits from Mozambique to Brazil President Joaquim Chissano President Armando Guebuza Prime Minister Aires Ali Brazil and Mozambique have signed several bilateral agreements such as agreements on cooperation in health, social policies and public security. In 2004, Brazil agreed to forgive 95% of Mozambique's debt to Brazil totaling US$280 million. In 2010, both nations signed agreements on air service cooperation and for mutual recognition of driver's license. In 2015, both nations signed an agreement on investment facilitation.

Mozambique is the largest recipient of Brazilian aid from the national aid agency Agência Brasileira de Cooperação. In 2017, trade between Brazil and Mozambique totaled US$169 million dollars. In 2010, Brazil opened an anti-retroviral medicine plant in Mozambique. In 2016, Brazilian investments in Mozambique reached US$10 billion in the mining and agriculture industries. Brazilian multinational companies such as Andrade Gutierrez, Odebrecht and Vale operate in Mozambique. Brazil has an embassy in Maputo. Mozambique has a consulate in Belo Horizonte. Lusophone Games United Kingdom of Portugal and the Algarves Abellán, Javier; the role of Brazil as a new donor of development aid in Africa. Africa, New Powers, Old Powers. University of Bologna

William Irving Shuman

William Irving Shuman, or Irving Shuman, was an American businessman and political activist during the late 19th and early 20th century. A longtime member of the Democratic Party in Moultrie County, Illinois, he was an Illinois delegate to the 1912 Democratic National Convention and served as assistant U. S. Treasurer in Chicago, Illinois during World War I. Shuman was born in Sullivan, Illinois, he left high school at age 16 and was immediately taken on at the State Bank of Sullivan, where he worked his way from bank teller, assistant cashier and to head cashier within five years. After two years, the 23-year-old Shuman was elected director becoming one of the youngest banking officials in the United States, he was elected as director of the Sullivan Elevator Company, one of the largest grain concerns in central Illinois, as well as the president of Group Seven of the Illinois Banking Association from 1911 to 1912. The organization represented Sangamon, Christian, Montgomery and Moultrie counties.

At the end of his term, he was unanimously elected as a member of the Council of the Illinois Bankers' Association for a three-year term. He was appointed to the State Bankers' Committee on Agricultural and Vocational Education and, two years he became assistant U. S. Treasurer on October 13, 1913, he remained in this position throughout the First World War, Shuman's early duties being to coordinate with Chicago banking officials in expediting the first issue of Aldrich-Vreeland currency and supervise the distribution of $25 million from the Chicago sub-treasury. He was chosen by U. S. Secretary of the Treasury William Gibbs McAdoo to co-operate with banking officials of the newly built Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Shuman placed the bank in a working basis and received acclaim by governors and assistants for his assistance. Prior to his appointment, he had become active in politics as a somewhat militant Progressive Democrat. In 1910, he became interested in Woodrow Wilson as a possible presidential candidate and, at the behest of McCombs, he assisted in campaigning for Wilson in Illinois and the Midwest during the presidential election the following year.

He was given complete control over the downstate Illinois campaign as well as being involved in the primaries in South Dakota and special work in Minnesota and Indiana. Elected as a member of the 19th Congressional District in Baltimore, Shuman is credited as being one of those whose influence switched the Illinois delegation to support Wilson in the Baltimore convention. After Wilson's successful election as President of the United States, he returned to his former position with the Sullivan Elevator Company becoming treasurer and director, a director of the Citizens' Abstract Company and the First National Bank in Wheaton, Illinois, he became a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, being the great-grandson of Isaac Bowman, as well as a member of the Union League, the Iroquois, Chicago Press, Railway and Manufacturers' Club. He was a 32nd degree Freemason and one of the officers of the Grand Royal Arch chapter. Following his death in 1958, he was buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia