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History
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A British Mark I helmet dating from 1917. This was a developed version of the original Brodie helmet and was worn by British Empire and US troops.
A British Mark I helmet dating from 1917. This was a developed version of the original Brodie helmet and was worn by British Empire and US troops.
The Illustrated War News—17 November 1915 The caption reads: Head-wounds have been more than usually numerous during the war, owing to the trench-figh
The Illustrated War News—17 November 1915 The caption reads: Head-wounds have been more than usually numerous during the war, owing to the trench-fighting, and more than usually severe, owing to the extensive use of shrapnel. But the danger, although it cannot be avoided, can be minimised. Our Army has now followed the French by adopting steel helmets, calculated to stop shell-splinters and shrapnel. Even in cases of extreme risk, not only has death been avoided, but injuries have been confined to bruises or superficial wounds. Cases have occurred in which the wearers have been hit, but saved by these helmets from what without them would have meant certain death. The fur coats, as they did last year, mean mitigation of the rigours of winter. The French helmets are known as "Adrians," after their inventor. (Photo by Illustrations Harrow).
The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment showing off their new Brodie helmets (1916).
The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment showing off their new Brodie helmets (1916).
U.S. Army Infantryman in 1942 wearing a M1917A1 helmet
U.S. Army Infantryman in 1942 wearing a M1917A1 helmet
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Example of a modern combat helmet (British Mk 6 with cloth cover)
Example of a modern combat helmet (British Mk 6 with cloth cover)