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Buck Rogers

Buck Rogers is a fictional space opera character created by Philip Francis Nowlan in the novella Armageddon 2419 A. D. subsequently appearing in multiple media. In Armageddon 2419 A. D. published in the August 1928 issue of the pulp magazine Amazing Stories, the character's given name was "Anthony". A sequel, The Airlords of Han, was published in the March 1929 issue. Nowlan was contracted by the syndicate John F. Dille Company to adapt the story into a comic strip. After Nowlan and Dille enlisted editorial cartoonist Dick Calkins as the illustrator, Nowlan adapted the first episode from Armageddon 2419 A. D. and changed the hero's name from "Anthony" to "Buck". The strip made its first newspaper appearance on January 7, 1929. Adaptations included radio in 1932, a film serial, a television series, other formats; the Buck Rogers strip was popular enough to inspire other newspaper syndicates to launch their own science fiction strips. The most famous of these imitators was Flash Gordon; the adventures of Buck Rogers in comic strips, movies and television became an important part of American popular culture.

It was on January 22, 1930, that Buck Rogers first ventured into space aboard a rocket ship in his fifth newspaper comic story Tiger Men From Mars. This popular phenomenon paralleled the development of space technology in the 20th century and introduced Americans to outer space as a familiar environment for swashbuckling adventure. Buck Rogers has been credited with bringing into popular media the concept of space exploration, following in the footsteps of literary pioneers such as Jules Verne, H. G. Wells and Edgar Rice Burroughs; the character first appeared as Anthony Rogers, the central character of Nowlan's Armageddon 2419 A. D. Born in 1898, Rogers is a veteran of the Great War and by 1927 is working for the American Radioactive Gas Corporation investigating reports of unusual phenomena in abandoned coal mines near Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania. On December 15, there is a cave-in. Exposed to radioactive gas, Rogers falls into "a state of suspended animation, free from the ravages of catabolic processes, without any apparent effect on physical or mental faculties".

Rogers remains in suspended animation for 492 years. Rogers awakens in 2419. Thinking that he has been asleep for just several hours, he wanders for a few days in unfamiliar forests, he notices someone clad in strange clothes, under attack. He defends Wilma Deering, killing one of the attackers and scaring off the rest. On "air patrol", Deering was attacked by an enemy gang, the Bad Bloods, presumed to have allied themselves with the Hans. Wilma takes Rogers to her camp, he is invited to leave and visit other gangs. They hope that Rogers' experience and knowledge he gained fighting in the First World War may be useful in their struggle with the Hans, who rule North America from 15 great cities they established across the continent, they ignored the Americans who were left to fend for themselves in the forests and mountains as their advanced technology prevented the need for slave labor. In the sequel, The Airlords of Han, six months have passed and the hunter is now the hunted. Rogers is now a gang leader and his forces, as well as the other American gangs, have surrounded the cities and are attacking constantly.

The airlords are determined to use their fleet of airships to break the siege. In 1933, Nowlan and Calkins co-wrote Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, a novella that retold the origin of Buck Rogers and summarized some of his adventures. A reprint of this work was included with the first edition of the novel Buck Rogers: A Life in the Future by Martin Caidin. In the 1960s, Nowlan's two novellas were combined by editor Donald A. Wollheim into one paperback novel, Armageddon 2419 A. D; the original 40-cent edition featured a cover by Ed Emshwiller. Nowlan is credited with the idea of serializing Buck Rogers, based on his novel Armageddon 2419 and its Amazing Stories sequels. Nowlan approached John F. Dille, president of the National Newspaper Service syndicate, who saw the opportunity to serialize the stories as a newspaper comic strip; the character was given the nickname "Buck," and some have suggested that Dille coined that name based on the 1920s cowboy actor Buck Jones. On January 7, 1929, the Buck Rogers in the 25th Century A.

D. comic strip debuted. Buck Rogers was syndicated to 47 newspapers. On March 30, 1930, a Sunday strip joined the Buck Rogers daily strip. Writer Nowlan told the inventor R. Buckminster Fuller in 1930 that "he used concepts for his cartoons". Dick Calkins, an advertising artist, drew the earliest daily strips, Russell Keaton drew the earliest Sunday strips. Like many popular comic strips of the day, Buck Rogers was reprinted in Big Little Books. At its peak in 1934, Buck Rogers appeared in 287 U. S. newspapers, was translated into 18 languages, appeared in an additional 160 international papers. Keaton wanted to switch to drawing another strip written by Calkins, Skyroads, so the syndicate advertised for

1934 Turkish Football Championship

The 1934 Turkish Football Championship was the fifth edition of the competition. It was held in October. Beşiktaş won their first national championship title by defeating Altay 3–1 in the final after overtime. For Altay it was the club's first appearance in the championship final, with one more to follow in 1951; the various regional champions competed in a group stage of five groups of three to six teams each, with the group winners advancing to the Final Phase. 1 Result not available. Isparta advanced to the group final. Isparta qualified for the final stage. Bursa San'atkâran received a bye for the group final. Beşiktaş qualified for the final stage. 1 Declared void as Konya İdman Yurdu fielded a player without license. Afyon Spor were awarded the win. 2 The licenses of Kütahya did not arrive in time. Çankaya were qualified for the group final. Afyon Spor received a bye for the group final. Çankaya qualified for the final stage. 1 Trabzon İdman Ocağı did not show up at overtime. Samsun İdman Yurdu were qualified for the final stage.

Altay qualified for the final stage. Samsun İdman Yurdu received a bye for the semi-final. Altay received a bye for the final. RSSSF

Roman Catholic Diocese of Greensburg

The Diocese of Greensburg is a Roman Catholic diocese centered in Greensburg, with 78 parishes in Armstrong, Fayette and Westmoreland counties in Western Pennsylvania in the United States. The diocese was founded on March 10, 1951. Edward C. Malesic was named its bishop on April 24, 2015. Bishops of the diocese and their tenures of service: Hugh L. Lamb William G. Connare Anthony G. Bosco Lawrence E. Brandt Edward C. Malesic Norbert F. Gaughan, appointed Bishop of Gary Cyril John Vogel, appointed Bishop of Salina in 1965 Giuseppe De Andrea, appointed Apostolic Nuncio and Titular Archbishop in 2001 and Assessor of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre Lawrence T. Persico, appointed Bishop of Erie in 2012 As of 2017, there are seventy-eight operating parishes within the Diocese of Greensburg. A diocesan strategic planning process began in 2006, which has resulted in closures of parishes and chapels, as well as partnering of parishes that have remained open, with the last of these changes occurring in 2013.

There are 18 educational facilities spread throughout the geographical terrain of the diocesan limits. There are 2 junior-senior high schools, 12 diocesan elementary schools and 3 non-diocesan Catholic schools Geibel Catholic Junior-Senior High School is located in Connellsville Township in northern Fayette County and serves the southern half of the diocesan territory. A Middle School concept was added at the beginning of the 2007-08 School Term, bringing the grade levels served at this facility 7-12. Greensburg Central Catholic Junior-Senior High School is located in Hempfield Township in central Westmoreland County and serves the central and northern sections of the diocesan territory; this school serves grades 7-12. * - denotes school only operates up to Grade 6, Grades 7-8 attend Geibel Catholic High School, if they wish. There are three non-diocesan facilities under the Educational Office. Clelian Heights School for Exceptional Children is located near Greensburg and is a school/residential complex for children ages 5–21 with intellectual/developmental disabilities.

The Clelian Center is on campus and provides adult services to the developemntally disabled. The school is a ministry of the Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Elizabeth Seton Montessori School is located near Greensburg and offers Montessori-Philosophy Education, auspiced by the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill. Verna Montessori School is located near Mount Pleasant and offers Montessori-Philosophy Education, auspiced by the Sisters of Charity of the Immaculate Conception In early 2016, a grand jury investigation, led by Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro, began an inquiry into sexual abuse by Catholic clergy in six Pennsylvania dioceses: Greensburg, Scranton, Harrisburg and Erie; the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown and the Archdiocese of Philadelphia were not included, as they had been the subjects of earlier investigations. According to The Philadelphia Inquirer, in 2017 the Diocese of Harrisburg and the Diocese of Greensburg attempted to shut down the grand jury investigation. On July 27, 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ordered that a redacted copy of the grand jury report be released to the public.

On July 31, 2018, John T. Sweeney, a former priest in the Diocese of Greenburg, pleaded guilty to molesting a 4th grade boy at some point between September 1991 and June 1992. Following Sweeney's plea, the Diocese of Greensburg made a statement pledging future cooperation. In the statement, reported by Crux on August 4, the Diocese of Greensburg agreed to continue educating “both children and adults in parishes and schools of the Diocese of Greensburg on how to spot and report suspected abuse.” The Diocese agreed to recommend reporting incidents of sexual abuse to the PA ChildLine and report any alleged incident of sexual abuse to "PA Childline and the appropriate district attorney."On August 9, 2018, Greensburg Bishop Edward Malesic issued an apology on behalf the Diocese, acknowledged there were numerous reports of sex abuse of children between the 1950s and 1980s, announced that the Diocese would release the names of the accused clergy when the grand jury report is published. The grand jury report was published on August 14, 2018 and showed that of the 301 priests accused of sexual abuse in the six dioceses, only 20 clergy were from the Diocese of Greensburg.

The report showed that one of the accused in the Diocese of Greensburg impregnated a 17 year old girl. The priest covered up the pregnancy by marrying the girl after forging the head pastor's name on a marriage certificate and filing for divorce months later. Despite fathering a child with a minor and being married and divorced, the priest still remained in the ministry. On December 21, 2018, Sweeney was given a 11 1/2 month to 5 year prison sentence, which he began serving. Roger Sinclair was laicized in 2002 after being accused of sexually abusing children in the Diocese of Greensburg. In 2018, Sinclair was convicted of sexually abusing disabled boys in the state of Oregon. Roman Catholic Diocese of Greensburg Official Site

For Ukraine!

For Ukraine! is a political party in Ukraine, headed by Vyacheslav Kyrylenko. It is the successor of Party of Social Protection; the Party of Social Security was established on October 9, 1999 as the People's Party of Depositors and Social Security and registered with the Ministry of Justice in May of the next year. It only took part in the 2006 Ukrainian parliamentary election where it won 0,05% of the votes and no seats. On December 23, 2008 Vyacheslav Kyrylenko, a former chairman of Our Ukraine and he was the frontrunner of Our Ukraine–People's Self-Defense Bloc during the 2007 Ukrainian parliamentary election, formed the parliamentarian deputy group For Ukraine in the Verkhovna Rada. At the constituent congress of the movement Vyacheslav Kyrylenko was elected its leader on February 21, 2009. In November 2009 Kyrylenko started to cooperate with the Party of Social Protection, in order to participate in the 2010 Ukrainian local elections. In November 2009 the Party of Social Protection changed its name to For Ukraine!.

In the 2010 local elections For Ukraine! won representatives in municipalities and 1 seat in the Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast Council and Volyn Oblast Council and 2 seats in the Sumy Oblast Council. In February 2011 Kyrylenko stated his "For Ukraine" would unify with Front of Changes and Ukraine United to create one single party before the 2012 parliamentary election. In December 2011 Kyrylenko signed an agreement with the head of the party Front of Changes, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, on joint opposition activity and merger of their parties after the election, they competed as a single party under the "umbrella" of "Fatherland", together with Front of Changes and several other parties, during the October 2012 parliamentary elections. During the election this list won 62 seats under the proportional party-list system and another 39 by winning 39 simple-majority constituencies; when Front of Changes merged into "Fatherland" in June 2013 the party did not merge with them as planned but instead kept its independence.

The party did not participate in the 2014 Ukrainian parliamentary election as Kyrylenko and many members have been active in the newly founded People's Front since 2014. For Ukraine: Informational website

David Reed (pioneer)

David Reed was an American pioneer in the early history of Pennsylvania. He was a squatter on land owned by George Washington in Pennsylvania. At that time, Washington owned a large parcel of land, totaling 58,000 acres, across Western Pennsylvania part of the American frontier; the land had been given to Washington in the District of West Augusta by the Colony of Virginia in consideration of his service during the French and Indian War. In 1777, David Reed, his brother John Reed, brother-in-law Samuel McBride and several other Seceder Presbyterians, moved from Lancaster County to what became Washington County, Pennsylvania, to take possession of land that they believed themselves to have purchased from a Colonel George Croghan, who himself had established an early British American trading post in the Ohio Country before the French and Indian War. In 1784, following the end of his service in the Continental Army, Washington traveled to survey his land holdings. Reed and other Scotch-Irish pioneers/squatters had arrived in the 1770s and had settled the land, building fences, log cabins, communities, which they felt gave them the right to the land.

The group referred to themselves as Seceders, an 18th-century movement within Scottish Presbyterian which spread to the North of Ireland. Washington was intent on enforcing his legal rights to collect back rent. Attempts were made to arrive at a peaceful solution. On September 14, 1784, Washington met with the squatters at his gristmill near present-day Venice. On September 20, 1784, a second meeting was held between Washington, Reed and a group 13 of other squatters; the efforts were unsuccessful. The meeting was recorded in Washington's journal thusly: September 20, 1784 dined at David Reed's, after which Mr. James Scott and Squire Reed began to enquire whether I would part with the land, upon what terms. I told them; the money to be paid in three annual payments with interest or to become tenants upon leases of 999 years at the annual rental of 10 pounds per C per annum, etc. In October 1786, a trial on the issue was held in Washington, with Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Thomas McKean riding circuit as the presiding judge.

Though Washington won the suit, he absolved the settlers of back rent. Many of the Seceder squatters left the area in response; the Reed brothers acquired farms in Cecil township in Washington County. Samuel McBride settled on a farm in what became Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. In 1950, the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission erected a historic marker at the site of his log cabin near Venice, Pennsylvania noting the historic importance of Reed and the squatters; the historical marker mistakenly identifies the Washington County squatters as Covenanters. Reed's descendants include David A. Reed. One of Samuel and Lydia McBride's descendants, Grace Elizabeth Crile, was the wife of George Washington Crile

Andrew Crofts (footballer)

Andrew Lawrence Crofts is a professional footballer, a player-coach for Brighton & Hove Albion under-23's. He has made 29 appearances for Wales at international level, he started his career with Gillingham, for whom he made his Football League debut at the age of 16, made over 190 appearances for the Kent-based club. He had loans at Peterborough United and Wrexham during the 2008–09 season and joined Brighton & Hove Albion in 2009. After a successful season at Brighton he transferred to Norwich City in 2010, before moving back to the South Coast club in 2012. A tough-tackling midfielder, Crofts represented Wales, where one of his grandparents was born, at under-19 and under-21 level and won his first senior cap in 2005. In 2008, he won his 12th cap, breaking the record for the most international caps received by a Gillingham player. Crofts was born in Chatham and began playing competitive football at the age of six for a club in nearby Rainham. Between the ages of 10 and 15 he attended weekly training sessions organised by Premier League club Chelsea.

He tried out on two occasions for the English Schools Football Association's national schoolboy team, but was unsuccessful. In September 2000, Crofts joined Gillingham as a trainee and was a regular in the club's youth and reserve teams during the 2000–01 season. At the end of the season, shortly before his 17th birthday, he was a surprise inclusion in the first team squad for a match at home to Watford, made his Football League debut as a late substitute, replacing Marlon King; the following season, he suffered a broken leg during a reserve team match and missed several months of the season. Although he returned to action in early 2002, his next appearance for the first team did not come until October, when he came on as a substitute in a League Cup match against Stockport County; this was to be his only senior appearance of the 2002–03 season. He secured a regular first team place towards the end of the following season, featuring during March and April 2004. Crofts was a first team regular in the 2004–05 season, making 27 Football League appearances, scoring his first senior goal for the club in a defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion on 26 December.

In January 2005, he signed a new contract designed to keep him at the club until 2009. He was omitted from the team for most of March and April, but was recalled for the last match of the season, in which a draw with Nottingham Forest led to the "Gills" being relegated from the Football League Championship, the second tier of English football, to Football League One, the third tier. In the 2005–06 season, he made the most appearances of any player in the Gillingham squad, missing only one of the team's 46 matches in League One. Although the team struggled in the league, finishing in the lower half of the table, they defeated Premier League team Portsmouth in the League Cup, with Crofts scoring the winning goal; the following season, he again made over 40 appearances and scored eight goals, his best total for an individual season, but Gillingham again finished the season in the bottom half of the table. He made his 100th start for the club on 18 December 2006 in a match against Bournemouth, marked the occasion with a goal.

At the end of the season, he won four awards at the club's Player of the Year event and was dubbed Mr Gillingham by then-manager Ronnie Jepson. He took over as team captain in the 2007–08 season, but it was an unsuccessful season for the team, who were relegated from League One; the following October he was stripped of the captaincy, instead given to Barry Fuller. Manager Mark Stimson stated that he felt that the captaincy might have been too much of a burden for Crofts, had a negative effect on his form. Soon afterwards, the club made Crofts available for transfer. In November 2008, he joined Peterborough United on loan. Shortly after returning to Gillingham the following January, he went on a second loan period, this time to Wrexham until the end of the season, he made his debut on the same day in a 2–1 defeat to Burton Albion. Upon his return to Gillingham from his loan spell, he was released from his contract. On 29 June 2009, Crofts agreed to join League One club Brighton & Hove Albion on a two-year contract.

He made his debut for Brighton during the 1–0 home defeat to Walsall on 8 August 2009 and scored his first goal for Brighton during the 2–2 draw at Yeovil Town on 10 October 2009. Crofts was given the role of captain by new manager Gus Poyet before the 3–1 away victory at Southampton. Crofts was confirmed as permanent captain at the beginning of January 2010. On 21 May 2010, Norwich City announced the acquisition of Crofts from Brighton, for an undisclosed fee, believed to be in the region of £300,000, he became the club's first signing of the summer transfer window, signing a three-year deal at Carrow Road. On 6 August 2010, he scored a goal on his debut against Watford, he subsequently gained promotion to the Premier League with the "Canaries" in his first season at the club. He kept his place as a regular starter for Norwich in the top tier, but in the second half of the 2011–12 season he fell out of favour at the club. Crofts was transferred back to Brighton in August 2012. On 19 March 2016, Crofts re-joined Gillingham on loan until the end of the season.

On 22 July 2016, Crofts signed a one-year contract with Charlton Athletic. He scored his first goal for Charlton in a 1–1 draw with Southend United on 31 December 2016. On 1 September 2017 the club announced. Crofts signed for Scunthorpe United on 31 August 2017, signing a one-year contract with the North Lincolnshire-based club. On 18 May 2018, he was not offered a new contract, On 26 June 2018 Crofts signed for Newport County on a one year contract