Cairo, Georgia

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Cairo, Georgia
City
Cairo City Hall
Cairo City Hall
Nickname(s): "Georgia's Hospitality City", and the"Syrup City"
Location in Grady County and the state of Georgia
Location in Grady County and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 30°53′N 84°13′W / 30.883°N 84.217°W / 30.883; -84.217Coordinates: 30°53′N 84°13′W / 30.883°N 84.217°W / 30.883; -84.217
Country United States
State Georgia
County Grady
Area
 • Total 9.8 sq mi (25.4 km2)
 • Land 9.7 sq mi (25.1 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)
Elevation 243 ft (74 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 9,607
 • Estimate (2016)[1] 9,570
 • Density 992/sq mi (382.9/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 31728, 39827, 39828
Area code(s) 229
FIPS code 13-12400[2]
GNIS feature ID 0354934[3]
Website www.syrupcity.net

Cairo (/ˈkr/) is a city in Grady County, Georgia, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 9,607.[4] The city is the county seat of Grady County.[5]

History[edit]

Cairo was founded in 1835. It was incorporated as a town in 1870 and as a city in 1906. In 1905, Cairo was designated seat of the newly formed Grady County.[6] The city was named after Cairo, the capital of Egypt.[7]

Recreation and entertainment[edit]

Cairo is close to great hunting, fishing, and points of historical interest.[8] The local industrial base continues to grow with manufacturing, service, and healthcare companies anchoring a strong economy.

The area is home to several local festivals, including Calvary's Mule Day,[9] Whigham's Rattlesnake Roundup,[10] Cairo's own Antique Car Rally,[11] and several competitive recreational programs. The Antique Car Rally features a wide range of cars, and includes many activities: a poker run, a parade, and even a street dance. It usually takes place on the second weekend of May. Sponsored by Mr. Chick, it is an annual event that attracts many people to the southwest corner of Georgia.

Education[edit]

Grady County Schools serves the city. Cairo High School, located in Cairo serves as a central high school for all of Grady County. Elementary schools serving students in the city include Eastside Elementary, Northside Elementary and Southside Elementary. Washington Middle School is serves Cairo residents.[12]

A campus of the Southern Regional Technical College is located in Cairo.

Health[edit]

Grady General Hospital serves the city. A 60-bed acute care facility, it has been affiliated with John D. Archbold Memorial Hospital in Thomasville since 1985.[13]

Geography[edit]

Cairo is located in central Grady County at 30°53′N 84°13′W / 30.883°N 84.217°W / 30.883; -84.217 (30.8778, -84.2089).[14] U.S. Route 84 (38th Boulevard) passes through the northern part of the city, leading east 14 miles (23 km) to Thomasville and west 24 miles (39 km) to Bainbridge. Valdosta is 59 miles (95 km) to the east, and Dothan, Alabama, is 79 miles (127 km) to the west on US 84. Georgia State Route 93 passes through the center of Cairo as Broad Street and Fifth Street; it leads north 19 miles (31 km) to Pelham and south 12 miles (19 km) to U.S. Route 319 north of the Florida border. Tallahassee, Florida, is 33 miles (53 km) to the south.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Cairo has a total area of 9.8 square miles (25.4 km2), of which 9.7 square miles (25.1 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km2), or 1.38%, is water.[15]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by relatively high temperatures and evenly distributed precipitation throughout the year. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Cairo has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[16]

Climate data for Cairo, Georgia
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 64
(18)
66
(19)
73
(23)
80
(27)
86
(30)
90
(32)
91
(33)
91
(33)
87
(31)
81
(27)
71
(22)
65
(18)
79
(26)
Average low °F (°C) 42
(6)
42
(6)
48
(9)
55
(13)
62
(17)
68
(20)
70
(21)
70
(21)
67
(19)
57
(14)
46
(8)
42
(6)
56
(13)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.9
(99)
4.1
(104)
5.3
(135)
3.9
(99)
3.4
(86)
5.5
(140)
6.4
(163)
5.6
(142)
4.4
(112)
2.5
(64)
2.6
(66)
3.5
(89)
51.2
(1,300)
Source: Weatherbase [17]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880275
189052189.5%
190069032.4%
19101,505118.1%
19201,90826.8%
19303,16966.1%
19404,65346.8%
19505,57719.9%
19607,42733.2%
19708,0618.5%
19808,7778.9%
19909,0352.9%
20009,2392.3%
20109,6074.0%
Est. 20169,570[1]−0.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[18]

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 9,239 people, 3,465 households, and 2,456 families residing in the city. The population density was 992.0 people per square mile (383.2/km²). There were 3,898 housing units at an average density of 418.5 per square mile (161.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 51.30% African American, 43.99% White, 0.42% Native American, 0.57% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.80% from other races, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.05% of the population.

There were 3,465 households out of which 34.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.4% were married couples living together, 24.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.1% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the city, the population was spread out with 29.1% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 83.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $23,054, and the median income for a family was $30,352. Males had a median income of $29,063 versus $20,542 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,759. About 24.4% of families and 30.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 41.2% of those under age 18 and 23.4% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-11-04. Retrieved 2011-11-18. 
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  6. ^ Hellmann, Paul T. (May 13, 2013). Historical Gazetteer of the United States. Routledge. p. 222. Retrieved 30 November 2013. 
  7. ^ Logue, Victoria; Logue, Frank (1997). Touring the Backroads of North and South Georgia. John F. Blair, Publisher. p. 412. ISBN 978-0-89587-171-8. 
  8. ^ "Tourism". Cairo Ga Chamber. Retrieved April 28, 2017. 
  9. ^ "Calvary Mule Day". Cairo Ga Chamber. Retrieved April 28, 2017. 
  10. ^ "Whigham Rattlesnake Roundup". Cairo Ga Chamber. Retrieved April 28, 2017. 
  11. ^ "Great Southern Antique Car Show and Rally". Cairo Ga Chamber. Retrieved April 28, 2017. 
  12. ^ "Schools." Grady County Schools. Retrieved on April 9, 2009.
  13. ^ "Grady General Hospital". Archbold Medical Center. Retrieved 2017-03-30. 
  14. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  15. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Cairo city, Georgia". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved November 23, 2016. 
  16. ^ Climate Summary for Cairo, Georgia
  17. ^ "Weatherbase.com". Weatherbase. 2013.  Retrieved on September 28, 2013.
  18. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 22, 2013. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 

External links[edit]