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Candler County, Georgia

Candler County is a county located in the U. S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,998; the county seat is Metter. The county was named for Allen D. Candler, the 56th governor of Georgia. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 249 square miles, of which 243 square miles is land and 5.8 square miles is water. The majority of Candler County is located in the Canoochee River sub-basin of the Ogeechee River basin; the western edge of the county, west of State Route 57, is located in the Ohoopee River sub-basin of the Altamaha River basin. Interstate 16 State Route 23 State Route 46 State Route 57 State Route 121 State Route 129 State Route 404 Bulloch County Evans County Tattnall County Emanuel County As of the census of 2000, there were 9,577 people, 3,375 households, 2,426 families living in the county; the population density was 39 people per square mile. There were 3,893 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile; the racial makeup of the county was 65.45% White, 27.08% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 6.16% from other races, 0.81% from two or more races.

9.21 % of the population were Latino of any race. There were 3,375 households out of which 33.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.80% were married couples living together, 14.30% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.10% were non-families. 23.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.40% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.17. In the county, the population was spread out with 26.80% under the age of 18, 9.40% from 18 to 24, 26.10% from 25 to 44, 22.50% from 45 to 64, 15.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 100.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.40 males. The median income for a household in the county was $25,022, the median income for a family was $30,705. Males had a median income of $24,482 versus $18,750 for females; the per capita income for the county was $12,958.

About 21.40% of families and 26.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.90% of those under age 18 and 22.00% of those age 65 or over. As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 10,998 people, 4,041 households, 2,793 families living in the county; the population density was 45.3 inhabitants per square mile. There were 4,761 housing units at an average density of 19.6 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 65.9% white, 24.4% black or African American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% American Indian, 8.0% from other races, 1.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 11.2% of the population. In terms of ancestry, 10.6% were Irish, 9.4% were English, 8.2% were German, 4.6% were American. Of the 4,041 households, 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.1% were married couples living together, 15.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.9% were non-families, 25.5% of all households were made up of individuals.

The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.15. The median age was 37.6 years. The median income for a household in the county was $35,828 and the median income for a family was $39,105. Males had a median income of $31,348 versus $23,044 for females; the per capita income for the county was $16,068. About 18.5% of families and 22.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.7% of those under age 18 and 16.7% of those age 65 or over. Metter Pulaski National Register of Historic Places listings in Candler County, Georgia Candler County Candler County historical marker

Magnificat

The Magnificat is a canticle known as the Song of Mary, the Canticle of Mary and, in the Byzantine tradition, the Ode of the Theotokos. It is traditionally incorporated into the liturgical services of the Catholic Church and of the Eastern Orthodox churches, it is one of the eight most ancient Christian hymns and the earliest Marian hymn. Its name comes from the incipit of the Latin version of the canticle's text; the text of the canticle is taken directly from the Gospel of Luke where it is spoken by Mary upon the occasion of her Visitation to her cousin Elizabeth. In the narrative, after Mary greets Elizabeth, pregnant with John the Baptist, the latter moves within Elizabeth's womb. Elizabeth praises Mary for her faith, Mary responds with what is now known as the Magnificat. Within the whole of Christianity, the Magnificat is most recited within the Liturgy of the Hours. In Western Christianity, the Magnificat is most sung or recited during the main evening prayer service: Vespers in the Catholic and Lutheran churches, Evening Prayer in Anglicanism.

In Eastern Christianity, the Magnificat is sung at Sunday Matins. Among Protestant groups, the Magnificat may be sung during worship services in the Advent season during which these verses are traditionally read. Mary's Magnificat, recorded only in Luke's Gospel, is one of four hymns, distilled from a collection of early Jewish-Christian canticles, which complement the promise-fulfillment theme of Luke's infancy narrative; these songs are Mary's Magnificat. In form and content, these four canticles are patterned on the "hymns of praise" in Israel's Psalter. In structure, these songs reflect the compositions of pre-Christian contemporary Jewish hymnology; the first stanza displays graphically a characteristic feature of Hebrew poetry—synonymous parallelism—in ascribing praise to God: "my soul" mirrors "my spirit". The balance of the opening two lines bursts out into a dual Magnificat of declaring the greatness of and finding delight in God; the third stanza again demonstrates parallelism, but in this instance, three contrasting parallels: the proud are reversed by the low estate, the mighty by those of low degree, the rich by the hungry.

Although there is some scholarly discussion of whether the historical Mary herself proclaimed this canticle, Luke portrays her as the singer of this song of reversals and the interpreter of the contemporary events taking place. Mary symbolizes both ancient Israel and the Lucan faith-community as the author/singer of the Magnificat; the canticle echoes several biblical passages, but the most pronounced allusions are to the Song of Hannah, from the Books of Samuel. Scriptural echoes from the Torah, the Prophets, the Writings complement the main allusions to Hannah's "magnificat of rejoicing". Along with the Benedictus, as well as several Old Testament canticles, the Magnificat is included in the Book of Odes, an ancient liturgical collection found in some manuscripts of the Septuagint. In a style reminiscent of Old Testament poetry and song, Mary praises the Lord in alignment with this structure: Mary rejoices that she has the privilege of giving birth to the promised Messiah, she glorifies God for His power and mercy.

Mary looks forward to God transforming the world through the Messiah. The proud will be brought low, the humble will be lifted up. Mary exalts God. Traditional My soul doth magnify the Lord, And my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour Because He hath regarded the humility of his handmaid: for behold from henceforth all generations shall call me blessed; because He, mighty hath done great things to me, holy is His name. And His mercy is from generation unto generations to them, he hath shewed might in His arm: He hath scattered the proud in the conceit of their heart. He hath put down the mighty from their seat, hath exalted the humble, he hath filled the hungry with good things, the rich he hath sent empty away. He hath received Israel His servant, being mindful of His mercy; as He spoke to our fathers. Glory be to the Father, to the Son, to the Holy Ghost, As it was in the beginning is now, shall be, world without end. Amen. Modern My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord, my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on his humble servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed, the Almighty has done great things for me, holy is his Name. He has mercy on those, he has shown the strength of his arm, he has scattered the proud in their conceit. He has cast down the mighty from their thrones, has lifted up the humble, he has filled the hungry with good things, the rich he has sent away empty. He has come to the help of his servant Israel for he has remembered his promise of mercy, the promise he made to our fathers, to Abraham and his children for ever. Glory to the Father, to the Son, to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, will be for ever. Amen, Alleluia; the first written variant of the Magnificat was in Koine Greek Μεγαλύνει ἡ ψυχή μου τὸν Κύριον καὶ ἠγαλλίασεν τὸ πνεῦμά μου ἐπὶ τῷ Θεῷ τῷ σω

Fountainhall railway station

Fountainhall railway station was a railway station that served the village of Fountainhall, Scottish Borders from 1848 to 1969 on the Waverley Route. The station opened on 4 August 1848 by the North British Railway; the station was situated on the south side of an unnamed minor road. The station opened as Burn House but it was changed to Fountainhall in 1849; the goods yard consisted of three sidings with the siding closest to the main line passing through a large goods shed. After the Lauder branch was built on 1 July 1901, the station's name was changed to Fountainhall Junction; the old goods shed was demolished and one of the three sidings was lifted. The Lauder branch closed on 12 September 1932; the station was still named Fountainhall Junction until April 1959 though the LNER timetable of 1937 didn't use the'junction' suffix. Goods services ceased on 18 May 1964 and the remaining sidings were lifted; the station was closed to passengers on 6 January 1969. In September 2015, the Waverley Route reopened as part of the Borders Railway.

Although the railway passes through the original Fountainhall station, it was not reopened

ARY Qtv

ARY QTV is a Pakistani television channel with a Sunni Islam religious focus, producing programs focusing on the Ahle Sunnat Wa Jama'at school. QTV is part of the ARY Digital Network; the channel has shows featuring well-known scholars such as Pir Saqib Shami, Muhammad Raza Saqib Mustafai, Shaykh Hassan Haseeb Ur Rehman, Dr. Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri, Dr. Umar Al-Qadri, Mufti Abu Baqr, Mufti Muhammad Akmal, Mufti Muhammad Shahid, Mufti Sohail Raza Amjadi and Mufti Muhammad Aamir. Other shows include Qur'an teachings, talk shows and answer shows, Qawwali music and Na`at poetry. Aap Kay Masail Ka Hal Ahkam-E-Shariyat Pir Saqib Shaami Burhan Ahmed Dr. Tahir-ul-Qadri Gulha-E-Naat Hayat-E-Sahaba Khutbat-Jumma Khuwab Kya Kehtey Hain Naat Zindagi Hai Quran Suniye Aur Sunaiyye Sana-E-Sarkar Seerat-Un_Nabi Subh Bakhair Tahfeem-Ul-Masail Tarteel-Ul-Quran Madani Channel Islam Channel Official Site Live Streaming Mobile App Pir Saqib Shaami ARY Qtv Live Online ARYQTV Video Portal Ary news live Facebook Official Page

Brandsville, Missouri

Brandsville is a city in southeastern Howell County, United States. The population was 161 at the 2010 census. Brandsville was platted in 1883, named after Michael Brand, the original owner of the city site. A post office called Brandsville has been in operation since 1883. Brandsville is located on U. S. Route 63, southeast of West Plains and just west of the Howell County - Oregon County line. Koshkonong lies along Route 63 to the southeast. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.52 square miles, all land. As of the census of 2010, there were 161 people, 61 households, 39 families living in the city; the population density was 309.6 inhabitants per square mile. There were 79 housing units at an average density of 151.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 89.44% White, 0.62% Native American, 8.70% from other races, 1.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.42% of the population. There were 61 households of which 39.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.0% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 13.1% had a male householder with no wife present, 36.1% were non-families.

27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.15. The median age in the city was 30.9 years. 27.3% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 54.7% male and 45.3% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 174 people, 65 households, 44 families living in the city; the population density was 367.7 people per square mile. There were 70 housing units at an average density of 147.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 97.70% White, 1.15% Native American, 1.15% from two or more races. There were 65 households out of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.3% were non-families. 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the city, the population was spread out with 33.3% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, 8.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 117.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.1 males. The median income for a household in the city was $27,188, the median income for a family was $30,000. Males had a median income of $23,214 versus $16,875 for females; the per capita income for the city was $12,024. About 20.5% of families and 21.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.4% of those under the age of eighteen and 14.3% of those sixty five or over

Jane Dormer

Jane Dormer, Duchess of Feria was an English lady-in-waiting to Mary I who, after the Queen's death, married Gómez Suárez de Figueroa y Córdoba, 1st Duke of Feria and went to live in Spain, where she would become a magnet for exiled English Catholics. She maintained a correspondence with Queen Elizabeth, corresponded with contacts sympathetic to the Roman Catholic cause in England. Within Spain she championed the cause of exiled English fallen on hard times. On her husband's death in 1571 she took over the management of his estates, she was buried at the monastery of Santa Clara in Zafra. Jane Dormer, born at Eythrope near Waddesdon, Buckinghamshire on 6 January 1538, the daughter of Sir William Dormer of Wing, Buckinghamshire, by his first wife, Mary Sidney, the daughter of Sir William Sidney of Penshurst and Anne Pakenham, she had two brothers, Thomas Dormer and Robert Dormer, a sister, Anne Dormer, who married Sir Walter Hungerford. She was the granddaughter of Sir Robert Dormer and Jane Newdigate, the daughter of John Newdigate, esquire, of Harefield, Middlesex, by Amphyllis Neville.

Jane Newdigate's brother was Sebastian Newdigate. Jane Dormer was born during the reign of Henry VIII, when her family was split by the religious controversy caused by the ongoing Reformation. On the one side, her father Sir William Dormer's family remained staunchly Roman Catholic. However, her mother Mary Sidney's family embraced Protestantism. Jane was raised broadly outside this latter influence from the death of her mother in 1542, but she spent her youth not only in the household of her paternal grandmother but as a playmate of the young Edward VI, she wrote in her memoirs, was fond of her and said after having beaten her at cards, "Now your king is gone Jane, I shall be good enough for you". Jane's faith and royal connections would take her to the heart of power. Despite an age gap of over 20 years and at the age of just 16, Jane became one of Queen Mary I's closest friends and confidantes. Queen Mary was reluctant to see her married, so she could stay at court. Edward Courtenay showed interest, amongst others.

In the end she made her own Spanish match by marrying Don Gomez Suarez de Figueroa of Cordova, Duke of Feria, a close confidante of Philip II of Spain and his first ambassador to Elizabeth I's court. Jane and Don Gomez had first met on King Philip's arrival in England in 1554; this never occurred, the two were not married until after Mary's death in 1558. The Duke and Duchess of Feria's union had two sons: Lorenzo Suárez de Figueroa y Córdoba, who would succeed his father as Duke of Feria, Pedro; the Duke of Feria was quick to perceive how Elizabeth's accession would change the religious tide in England and, despite his formal role as Spanish ambassador, he refused to attend Elizabeth's coronation in a public rejection of expected Protestant elements in the service. When the Duke of Feria was replaced as ambassador in 1559, he and Jane returned to the continent with a mixed retinue of monks and nuns, her cousin Margaret Harington, Susan Clarencieux, one of Mary's former ladies-in-waiting. Once in Spain, Jane became a lightning rod for exiled English Catholics.

Jane kept up her correspondence with Elizabeth, but she received letters from four popes and maintained numerous other contacts sympathetic to the Roman Catholic cause in England, within Spain she was a champion of exiled English fallen on hard times. On her husband's death in 1571 she took over the management of his estates; the Spanish respected her for her political understanding, 1592 she was a strong candidate to take up the governorship of Flanders. The Duchess's health never recovered from an accident in 1609, she was bedridden from the start of 1611 – planning ahead she had prepared a coffin which she kept in the house. At her death on 13 January 1612, she was attended by seven priests, she was buried at the monastery of Santa Clara in Zafra on 26 January. Her son Lorenzo Suárez de Figueroa y Córdoba succeeded his father as Duke of Feria. Clifford, Henry; the Life of Jane Dormer, Duchess of Feria. London: Burns and Oates. Crummé, Hannah L.. "Jane Dormer's Recipe for Politics". The Politics of Female Households: Ladies-in-waiting across Early Modern Europe.

Leiden, Netherlands: Koninklijke Brill NV. ISBN 9789004258396. Dale, M. K.. "Dormer, Robert, of West Wycombe and Wing, Bucks. and London". In Bindoff, S. T.. The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1509–1558. Boydell and Brewer. Dale, M. K.. "Dormer, William, of Eythrope in Waddesdon, Bucks.". In Bindoff, S. T.. The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1509–1558. Boydell and Brewer. Fuidge, N. M.. "Dormer, Sir William, of Wing, Bucks". In Hasler, P. W.. The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1558–1603. Boydell and Brewer. Loades, David. "Tonge, Susan". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/94978. Richardson, Douglas. Everingham, Kimball G.. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. III. Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X. Rodriguez-Salgado, M. J.. "Suárez de Figueroa [Dorm