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Charles Davidson Bell

Charles Davidson Bell FRSE was the Surveyor-General in the Cape Colony, an artist and designer of Cape medals and stamps. Born on 22 October 1813 at Newhall, Fife, Scotland, he was educated locally at St Andrews University. Bell left Scotland and sailed to South Africa, landing at the Cape of Good Hope in 1830 and through his uncle Sir John Bell, Secretary to the Cape Government, was given a post in the civil service, he was appointed as expedition artist on Dr. Andrew Smith's two-year journey north as far as the Limpopo in 1834, he went from Acting Clerk of the Legislative Council in 1838, to Assistant Surveyor-General in 1843, to Surveyor-General in 1848. In 1851, he designed a silver gallantry medal for Cape governor Sir Harry Smith to present to troops during the 8th Frontier War; this is referred to as the first South African medal. Appointed to the Postal Enquiry Board in 1852, he designed the well-known Cape of Good Hope triangular stamp, the first of that shape, which became rare and much sought after by philatelists.

His design of rectangular stamps remained in use until 1902. Many of his sketches and paintings show a whimsical sense of humour, though his sensitive portrayals of the mixed population of Cape Town and of the tribes he encountered on the Smith expedition to the north, have become an invaluable record of life in 19th-century South Africa; the return of many of his paintings from England to South Africa in 1978, gave art historians a fresh appreciation of his work and greater insight into that period of Cape history. However, in his essay "Alcohol and Art", Russel Viljoen, professor in history at the University of South Africa wrote: International interest in the'Hottentots' of South Africa date back and span many centuries. Recurrent colonial encounters influenced the way in which artists, travel writers and colonial observers represented the Khoikhoi people. Against this backdrop, the colonial artist Charles Davidson Bell had produced a few sketches of Khoikhoi men and women, depicting them either as useless drunkards or lazy members of Cape society... the duplication and re-duplication of these stereotyped images distributed as'pictorial souvenirs' in the form of 201 postcards invariably left an imprint of negativity in the psyche of the colonial beholder.

Bell made an important contribution to heraldry in South Africa. Throughout his residence at the Cape, he copied old Dutch/Afrikaner coats of arms from memorials, stained glass windows, other artefacts, in 1861 he advertised his intention of publishing them in book form; the book did not see the light of day, but he gave the manuscript, the drawings, his notes to his brother-in-law Daniel Krynauw. Krynauw built up his own heraldry collection, after his death, the two collections were placed in a Cape Town museum, from where they were transferred to the South African Library in 1946; the material in the Bell-Krynauw Collection was published in Cornelis Pama's Die Wapens van die Ou Afrikaanse Families, his heraldry books. Bell designed the arms of the South African College, the "three anchors" badge of the South African Mutual Life Assurance Society, of which he was chairman at one time. Both emblems are still in use, may well be the oldest academic arms and corporate logo in South Africa. Bell was a chairman of the South African Mutual Life Assurance Society.

He was awarded a gold medal in 1851 for his oil painting depicting the Landing of van Riebeeck at the Cape of Good Hope. A large number of his originals hang in the Library of Parliament in Cape Town, the University of the Witwatersrand and the Africana Museum in Johannesburg; the book Travels in the Interior of South Africa by James Chapman, was illustrated by Bell. His Reports of the Surveyor-General, Charles D. Bell Esq. on the copper fields of Little Namaqualand was written after a three-month visit to the area. He gave his name to the town of Bellville in the Cape, Bell, a small village between Peddie and Hamburg, near the mouth of the Keiskamma River in the Eastern Cape. John Bell was the eldest son of Charles Davidson Bell. Between 1861 and 1862 he accompanied Henry Samuel Chapman from Cape Town to Walvis Bay, through Hereroland to Lake Ngami and back to the Cape Colony via Shoshong and Hopetown, he died in 1878 in England. Charles Bell was a friend of Andrew Geddes Bain and was a pall-bearer at his funeral in 1864.

After his retirement in 1872 he returned to Scotland in 1873 with Helena and their 3 surviving children, where Helena Bell died on 10 September 1881 and he died on 7 April 1882. Bell married Martha Antoinette Ebden on 3 June 1841. John Alexander Bell born 25 January 1843 in Grahamstown Charles David Ebden Bell born 1 August 1845 in Cape Town Catherine Mariann Bell born 16 December 1848 at Canigou, Cape Town died 16 July 1863Charles Bell divorced Martha Ebden on 1 July 1850 having cited Dr. Lestock Wilson Stewart as co-respondent. Court granted Charles Bell custody of the three children – Martha gave birth to second daughter Charlotte Margaret on 17 October 1850 – Bell denied paternity. Charlotte Margaret died before 10 April 1866. Bell's second marriage to Helena Krynauw on 7 July 1859. Helena Isabella Bell born 31 May 1860 in Cape Town Alexander Bell born 15 September 1861 in Cape Town Anthony Bell born 9 February 1863 in Cape Town David Duncan Traill Bell born 21 April 1864 Cape Town died 14 December 1865 Catherine Susan Bell born 11 May 1865 Cape Town died 13 September 1865 Biography of Charles Davidson Bell at the S2A3 Biographical Database of Sout

Gyula Bencz├║r

Gyula Benczúr was a Hungarian painter and art teacher. He specialized in historical scenes, his family moved to Kassa when he was still young and he displayed an early talent for drawing. He began his studies in 1861 with Johann Georg Hiltensperger. From 1865 to 1869, he studied with Karl von Piloty, he achieved international success in 1870 when he won the Hungarian national competition for historical painting with his depiction of King Stephen's baptism. He assisted Piloty with the frescoes at the Maximilianeum and the Rathaus in Munich and illustrated books by the great German writer, Friedrich Schiller. King Ludwig II of Bavaria gave him several commissions, he was named a Professor at the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, in 1875. Soon after, he built a home in Ambach on Lake Starnberg. In 1883, he returned to Hungary. One of his most distinguished pupils was the Swiss-born American painter Adolfo Müller-Ury. Benczúr was a favorite among the Hungarian upper-class, painting numerous portraits of kings and aristocrats.

He created some religious works. He was an honorary member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Streets have been named after him in Balassagyarmat, Berettyóújfalu, Bonyhád, Debrecen, Jászberény, Komló, Pécs, Szabadszállás, Szeged and Košice, his daughters Olga and Ida became well-known artists. Gyula Benczúr, Exposition Memoriale. Budapest: Hungarian National Museum, 1958 Gábor Ö. Pogány. Nineteenth Century Hungarian Painting, Budapest: Corvina Press, 1972 Katalin Telepy, Benczúr. Nyíregyháza, Hungary: Jósa András Múzeum, 1963 Antal Kampis, The History of Art in Hungary. Budapest: Corvina Press, 1966 Works and biography of Gyula Benczúr @ Fine arts in Hungary Works of Gyula Benczúr held in Slovak art collections

Beyond Our Ken

Beyond Our Ken is a radio comedy programme, the predecessor to Round the Horne. Both programmes starred Kenneth Horne, Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick, Betty Marsden and Bill Pertwee, with announcer Douglas Smith. Musical accompaniment was provided by the BBC Revue Orchestra; the title is a pun on Kenneth Horne's name that hinges on the familiar expression "beyond our ken". Eric Merriman had written material for Kenneth Horne on Henry Hall's Guest Night and Variety Playhouse and written some stand-up comedy material for Barry Took. In June 1957 the BBC Radio Variety department asked Merriman to come up with an idea for a radio series starring Horne. Merriman devised; the original memo on the subject still exists in the BBC archives. The proposal was for a solo comedy series based on a formula of a fictional week in the life of Kenneth Horne. Other memos from the BBC archive show how the proposed format evolved and the discussion of alternative titles, including Around the Horne. Pilot The script for the pilot was written by Eric Merriman and Barry Took, recorded on 2 October 1957.

The supporting cast included Betty Marsden, Ron Moody, Hugh Paddick and Kenneth Williams with singer Patricia Lancaster. It was well received by the studio audience and the BBC agreed to proceed with a series; the project was put on hold in February 1958 after Kenneth Horne suffered a stroke that left him paralysed. However he was left with only a slight limp. Work on the series resumed within months. Series 1 The first edition of Beyond Our Ken was broadcast on 1 July 1958. Series 1 ran for 21 episodes plus a Christmas special; the scripts were written by Barry Took. The cast was Kenneth Horne, Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick, Betty Marsden, Ron Moody, Stanley Unwin, announcer Douglas Smith with music by Pat Lancaster, the Malcolm Mitchell Trio and the BBC Revue Orchestra; the Malcolm Mitchell Trio, a close harmony group, was replaced by the Fraser Hayes Four from the 17th episode. The producer was Jacques Brown, except for episodes 20 and 21 which were produced by Charles Maxwell. Series 2 Series 2 ran for 20 episodes from 19 March 1959 plus a Christmas special.

The scripts were written by Barry Took. The cast was Kenneth Horne, Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick, Betty Marsden, Bill Pertwee, announcer Douglas Smith with music by Pat Lancaster, the Fraser Hayes Four, Edwin Braden and the BBC Revue Orchestra; the producer was Jacques Brown. Series 3 Series 3 ran for 14 episodes from 19 April 1960; the scripts were written by Eric Merriman after Barry Took left over a disagreement. The cast was Kenneth Horne, Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick, Betty Marsden, Bill Pertwee, Janet Waters, announcer Douglas Smith with music by Pat Lancaster, the Fraser Hayes Four, the Hornets, Edwin Braden and the BBC Revue Orchestra; the producer was Jacques Brown. Series 4 Series 4 ran for 20 episodes from 20 October 1960; the scripts were written by Eric Merriman. The cast was Kenneth Horne, Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick, Betty Marsden, Bill Pertwee, announcer Douglas Smith with music by Pat Lancaster, Edwin Braden, the Fraser Hayes Four and the BBC Revue Orchestra; the producer was Jacques Brown.

Series 5 Series 5 ran for 20 episodes from 12 October 1961. The scripts were written by Eric Merriman; the cast was Kenneth Horne, Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick, Betty Marsden, Bill Pertwee, announcer Douglas Smith, with music by Jill Day, Edwin Braden, the Fraser Hayes Four and the BBC Revue Orchestra. The producer was Jacques Brown. Series 6 Series 6 ran for 13 episodes from 27 December 1962; the scripts were written by Eric Merriman. The cast was Kenneth Horne, Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick, Betty Marsden, Bill Pertwee, announcer Douglas Smith with music by Eileen Gourlay, Edwin Braden, the Fraser Hayes Four and the BBC Revue Orchestra; the producer was John Simmonds. Series 7 Series 7 ran for 13 episodes from 24 November 1963; the scripts were written by Eric Merriman. The cast was Kenneth Horne, Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick, Betty Marsden, Bill Pertwee, announcer Douglas Smith with music by Eileen Gourlay, Edwin Braden, the Fraser Hayes Four and the BBC Revue Orchestra; the producer was John Simmonds.

Detailed information on individual episodes has been gathered at the Kenneth Williams Appreciation Pages Beyond Our Ken featured characters similar to those featured in Round the Horne, for instance Betty Marsden's Fanny Haddock. It featured Pertwee's Frankie Howerd impersonation, Hankie Flowered, Hugh Paddick's working-class pop singer Ricky Livid – the name being a mickey-take on contemporary pop singers' stage names such as Tommy Steele and Marty Wilde. Another favourite was Kenneth Williams' country character, Arthur Fallowfield, based on Dorset farmer Ralph Wightman, a regular contributor to the BBC radio programme Any Questions? Fallowfield's lines were full of innuendo and double entendre – on one occasion Horne introduced him as the man who put the sex in Sussex. Fallowfield's reply to any question began: "Well, I think the answer lies in the soil." Williams and Paddick played two camp men-about-town and Charles, in many ways precursors of Julian and Sandy in Round The Horne. By 1964, Eric Merriman was much in demand for television work and decided to end writing Beyond Our Ken.

Because of the show's huge success, the BBC were determined. The show's name had to be changed. Barry T