Coppa Italia

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Coppa Italia
TIM CUP.png
Founded 1922
Region Italy
Number of teams 78
Qualifier for UEFA Europa League
Domestic cup(s) Supercoppa Italiana
Current champions Juventus (13th title)
Most successful club(s) Juventus (13 titles)
Website Official Coppa Italia site
2018–19 Coppa Italia

The Coppa Italia (Italian for Italy Cup) is an Italian football annual cup competition. Its first edition was held in 1922 and was won by Vado. The second tournament was scheduled for the 1926–27 season but was cancelled during the round of 16. The third edition was not held until 1935–36 when it started being scheduled annually. The events of World War II interrupted the tournament after the 1942–43 season, and it did not resume again until 1958 where it has been played annually continuously since.

Juventus is the competition's most successful club with 13 wins, followed by Roma with 9. Juventus has contested the most finals with 18, followed by Roma with 17 finals. The holder can wear a "tricolore" cockade (Italian: coccarda), akin to the roundels that appear on military aircraft and automatically qualifies for the UEFA Europa League group stage the following next season.

Format[edit]

The competition is a knockout tournament with pairings for each round made in advance; the draw for the whole competition is made before a ball is kicked. Each tie is played as a single leg, with the exception of the two-legged semi-finals. If a match is drawn, extra time is played. In the event of a draw after 120 minutes, a penalty shoot-out is contested. As well as being presented with the trophy, the winning team also qualifies for the UEFA Europa League (formerly the UEFA Cup). If the winners have already qualified for the UEFA Champions League via Serie A, or are not entitled to play in UEFA competitions for any reason, the place goes to the next highest placed finisher in the league table.

Coccarda, winners' patch

There are a total of eight rounds in the competition. The competition begins in August with the first round and is contested only by the lowest-ranked clubs – those outside the top two divisions. Clubs playing in Serie B join in during the second round and the 12 lowest-ranked teams in Serie A based on the previous league season's positions (unless they are to compete in European competition that year) begin the competition in the third round before August is over. The remaining eight Serie A teams join the competition in the fourth round in January, at which point 16 teams remain. The round of 16, the quarter-finals and the first leg of the semi-finals are then played in quick succession after the fourth round and the second leg of the semi-final is played a couple of months later; in April before the May-contest final. The rather unusual two-leg final was eliminated since the 2007–08 edition and a single-match final is now played at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome.[1]

Phase Round Clubs
remaining
Clubs
involved
Winners from
previous round
New entries
this round
Leagues entering at this round
First Phase First Round 78 36 none 36 Teams from Serie C and Serie D
Second Round 60 40 18 22 Serie B
Third Round 40 32 20 12 Lowest-ranked Serie A teams
Fourth Round 24 16 16 none none
Second Phase Round of 16 16 16 8 8 Highest-ranked Serie A teams
Quarter-finals 8 8 8 none none
Semi-finals 4 4 4 none none
Final 2 2 2 none none

Winners by year[edit]

Coppa Italia

Performance by club[edit]

Trophies[edit]

Club Winners Winning years
Juventus
13
1938, 1942, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1979, 1983, 1990, 1995, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Roma
9
1964, 1969, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1991, 2007, 2008
Internazionale
7
1939, 1978, 1982, 2005, 2006, 2010, 2011
Fiorentina
6
1940, 1961, 1966, 1975, 1996, 2001
Lazio
6
1958, 1998, 2000, 2004, 2009, 2013
Torino
5
1936, 1943, 1968, 1971, 1993
Milan
5
1967, 1972, 1973, 1977, 2003
Napoli
5
1962, 1976, 1987, 2012, 2014
Sampdoria
4
1985, 1988, 1989, 1994
Parma
3
1992, 1999, 2002
Bologna
2
1970, 1974
Vicenza
1
1997
Atalanta
1
1963
Venezia
1
1941
Genoa
1
1937
Vado
1
1922[1]
Total
70[2]
Notes
1 The 1922 tournament was contested only by minor teams, the biggest clubs having left FIGC to form a private league of their own.
2 Although 71 tournaments have been contested only 70 championships have been assigned. The 1926–27 tournament was cancelled in the round of sixteen.

Finals[edit]

Club Finalists Finals years
Juventus
18
1938, 1942, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1973, 1979, 1983, 1990, 1992, 1995, 2002, 2004, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Roma
17
1937, 1941, 1964, 1969, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1991, 1993, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2013
Milan
14
1942, 1967, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1985, 1990, 1998, 2003, 2016, 2018
Internazionale
13
1939, 1959, 1965, 1977, 1978, 1982, 2000, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011
Torino
13
1936, 1938, 1943, 1963, 1964, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1988, 1993
Fiorentina
10
1940, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1966, 1975, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2014
Lazio
9
1958, 1961, 1998, 2000, 2004, 2009, 2013, 2015, 2017
Napoli
9
1962, 1972, 1976, 1978, 1987, 1989, 1997, 2012, 2014
Sampdoria
7
1985, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1994, 2009
Parma
5
1992, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2002
Palermo
3
1974, 1979, 2011
Hellas Verona
3
1976, 1983, 1984
Atalanta
3
1963, 1987, 1996
Genoa
2
1937, 1940
Venezia
2
1941, 1943
Bologna
2
1970, 1974
Alessandria
1
1936
Novara
1
1939
SPAL
1
1962
Catanzaro
1
1966
Padova
1
1967
Cagliari
1
1969
Ancona
1
1994
Vicenza
1
1997
Vado
1
1922
Udinese
1
1922
Total
140

Note: from 1968 to 1971, FIGC introduced a final group instead of semifinals and finals. For statistical equity, only champions and runners-up of those groups are counted as finalists. Moreover, in 1971, a decisive match between the two best clubs was played to assign the cup.

Media coverage[edit]

The Coppa Italia currently has a broadcasting agreement with RAI through 2020–21 edition.[2]

The later stages of the competition are broadcast by Sky Sports in both Ireland and the United Kingdom. In Spain, the later stages of the competition are broadcast by Teledeporte since the 2016–17 edition.[3]

In MENA, Abu Dhabi Sports started broadcasting the competition since the 2015–16 edition.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "TIM Cup – Sede di Gara Finale 2007/2008" (PDF) (in Italian). Lega Nazionale Professionisti. 2007-12-06. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 28, 2008.
  2. ^ "La Champions torna in Rai - Calcio - RaiSport". raisport. Retrieved 2018-09-16.
  3. ^ "Teledeporte compra a última hora la retransmisión de la Supercopa de Italia entre Juventus y AC Milan". palco23.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017-03-01.
  4. ^ "كأس إيطاليا Archives - Abu Dhabi Sports | أبو ظبي الرياضية". Abu Dhabi Sports | أبو ظبي الرياضية. Retrieved 2017-01-17.

External links[edit]