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Cynetes

The Cynetes or Conii were one of the pre-Roman peoples of the Iberian Peninsula, living in today's Algarve and Lower Alentejo regions of southern Portugal, the southern part of Badajoz and the northwestern portions of Córdoba and Ciudad Real provinces in Spain before the 6th century BCE. According to Justin's epitome, the mythical Gargoris and Habis were the founding kings, they are mentioned in the ancient sources under various designations Greek or Latin derivatives of their two tribal names: ‘Cynetas’/’Cynetum’. The Conii occupied since the late Bronze Age most of the present-day Lower Alentejo, the southern part of Badajoz and the northwestern portions of Córdoba and Ciudad Real provinces, giving the Algarve its pre-Roman name, the Cyneticum. Prior to the Celtic-Turduli migrations of the 5th-4th Centuries BC the original Conii territories included upper Alentejo and the Portuguese coastal Estremadura region stretching up to the Munda river valley, their presence in these regions is attested archeologically by the elaborated cremation burial-mounds of their ruling elite, whose rich grave-goods and the inscribed slabs in ‘Tartessian alphabet’ – referred to as ‘Southwest script’ – that mark the graves, evidence close contacts with North Africa and the eastern Mediterranean since the 9th century BC.

Scholars like Schulten, consider the Conii a Ligurian tribe and believe that the «Ligurians are the original people of the Iberian Peninsula». The Conii would have left their mark not only in Portugal but in Spain and European regions where the Ligurians established themselves, they appear to be related to the Aquitanians and the Basques. Inscriptions in the Tartessian language have been found in the area, in a variety referred to as Southwest Paleohispanic script; the name Conii, found in Strabo, seems to have been identical with the Cynesii, who were mentioned by Herodotus as the westernmost dwellers of Europe and distinguished by him from the Celts. The capital of the Conii was Conistorgis, according to Strabo. In the local language Conistorgis means "City of the Conii", its precise location has not been determined. Some authors suggest. Other Conii towns included Ipses, Ossonoba, Balsa and Myrtilis. According to Pomponius Mela the population of these parva oppida did not surpass 6,000 inhabitants.

A powerful urban aristocracy of Phoenician and Turdetanian or Turduli colonists dominated all the trade and shipbuilding in these same coastal settlements since the 4th Century BC, until the Carthaginians occupied the Cyneticum and founded the Punic colonies of Portus Hannibalis and Portus Magonis at the late 3rd Century BC. The Conii seemed to have played no significant role in the 2nd Punic War and subsequent conflicts though they were under the pressure from the northernly Celtic tribes throughout the 3rd-2nd Centuries BC, which may explain their willingness to place themselves under the protection of foreign powers such as Carthage and Rome. Around the 3rd Century BC the Celtici reached the western Algarve, establishing a colony at Laccobriga and in 153 BC, during the Lusitanian Wars against Rome, Conistorgis fell to the Lusitani and their Vettones’ allies; the Conii were thence forced to switch their allegiance from the Roman Republic to the Lusitani, being subjected in 141-140 BC to Consul Quintus Fabius Maximus Servilianus’ reprisal campaigns in the Iberian southwest.

In 138-137 BC the Cyneticum was aggregated into Hispania Ulterior province, only to become again a battleground during the Sertorian Wars, when Quintus Sertorius seized Conistorgis and Consul Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius devastated the region in retaliation, being defeated at the battle of Laccobriga in 78 BC. In 27-13 BC the romanized Conii were incorporated into Lusitania province. History of Portugal Prehistoric Iberia Cyneticum Timeline of Portuguese history Sefes Sertorian Wars Southwest Paleohispanic script "Tartessian" language Pre-Roman peoples of the Iberian Peninsula Arruda, Ana Margarida, O 1.º milénio a.n.e no centro e sul de Portugal: leituras possíveis no início de um novo século, in O Arqueólogo Português, série IV, volume 23, Lisboa, pp. 9–156. Mattoso, José, História de Portugal. Primeiro Volume: Antes de Portugal, Lisboa, Círculo de Leitores, 1992. Berrocal-Rangel, Luis. "The Celts of the Southwestern Iberian Peninsula". E-Keltoi: Journal of Interdisciplinary Celtic Studies.

6: 481–96. Júdice Gamito, Teresa. "The Celts in Portugal". E-Keltoi: Journal of Interdisciplinary Celtic Studies. 6: 571–605. Strabo, Geographika, III, 2, 2. Muñoz, Mauricio Pasto: Viriato, A Luta pela Liberdade, Ésquilo, Lisboa 2003 ISBN 972-8605-23-4 Ángel Montenegro et alii, Historia de España 2 - colonizaciones y formación de los pueblos prerromanos, Editorial Gredos, Madrid ISBN 84-249-1386-8 Berrocal-Rangel, Los pueblos célticos del soroeste de la Península Ibérica, Editorial Complutense, Madrid ISBN 84-7491-447-7 Philip Matysak and the struggle for Spain, Pen & Sword Military, Barnsley ISBN 978-1848847873 Luis Silva and the Lusitanian resistance to Rome 155-139

Evelien

Evelien is a Dutch dramedy television series made for broadcaster Net 5. Actress Kim van Kooten plays the eponymous starring role. So far two seasons have been made. In 2007 the series was sold to Belgian channel Een. Evelien is a 38-year-old woman, but still she feels. Each episode chronicles her daily routine. In the first episode it becomes clear. Theo runs a construction company; when confronted with a fellow divorcing mother—who caught her husband having an affair—Evelien reconsiders her relationship with Theo. In the following episode, she flatly tells Theo that she doesn't want anything to do with him anymore—even though Theo has fallen in love with Evelien and keeps proposing to her. Things come to a head; when she gets called out for her strange behaviour on the phone, Evelien's husband realizes what happens and storms out of the house. The following episodes show the aftermath of this temporary breakup, though the two reconcile. However, all is still not perfect. Soon afterwards she learns from Theo's sudden death.

The family moves to a more spacious house in Amsterdam. Because the house is decorated in a new-age minimalist sense, it causes tension with the children and Harko too are struggling to get used to the new furniture. Breaking out of her boring routine Evelien takes a part-time job, but Harko is now going through the throes of a mid-life crisis. Things only get worse. Seeking relation therapy doesn't help and Harko announces that he needs a weekend off in London. Evelien bursts into tears when she discovers the truth, but her marriage turns out to be made of strong stuff and all is forgiven. Kim van Kooten – Evelien Peter Blok – Harko Sterre Herstel – Regina Naomi van Es – Julia Olga Zuiderhoek – Agnes Genio de Groot – Gert Rifka Lodeizen – Sylvia Official homepage Evelien

Charles Antzelevitch

Charles Antzelevitch is an American cardiovascular research scientist in the fields of cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmia syndromes. Antzelevitch graduated from City University of New York with a BA in biology, he earned a PhD in pharmacology from State University of New York Upstate Medical University in 1978. From 1977 to 1980, he held a postdoctoral fellowship in the department of experimental cardiology at the Masonic Medical Research Laboratory in Utica, New York. After his fellowship, he joined the staff at MMRL as a research scientist, where he was named executive director and director of research and became Gordon K. Moe Scholar, an endowed chair in experimental cardiology, he was a member of the faculty at SUNY Health Science Center in Syracuse, New York, from 1980 until 2015. In 1980, he received an appointment as assistant professor in the department of pharmacology, he was promoted to associate professor, research professor, professor of pharmacology. In 2015, Antzelevitch became professor and executive director of cardiovascular research at Lankenau Institute for Medical Research and director of research at Lankenau Heart Institute.

Antzelevitch was president of the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society from 1996 to 1998 and has served as secretary/treasurer since 1998. He serves on the editorial board of several other peer-reviewed medical publications, including Journal of Electrocardiology and Journal of the American College of Cardiology. LIMR faculty page for Charles Antzelevitch Google Scholar Citations

WirelessHART

WirelessHART is a wireless sensor networking technology based on the Highway Addressable Remote Transducer Protocol. Developed as a multi-vendor, interoperable wireless standard, WirelessHART was defined for the requirements of process field device networks; the protocol utilizes a time synchronized, self-organizing, self-healing mesh architecture. The protocol supports operation in the 2.4 GHz ISM band using IEEE 802.15.4 standard radios. The underlying wireless technology is based on the work of Dust Networks' TSMP technology; the standard was initiated in early 2004 and developed by 37 HART Communications Foundation companies that - amongst others - included ABB, Endress+Hauser, Pepperl+Fuchs, Freescale Semiconductor, Software Technologies Group, AirSprite Technologies which went on to form WiTECK, an open non-profit membership organization whose mission is to provide a reliable, cost-effective, high-quality portfolio of core enabling system software for industrial wireless sensing applications, under a company and platform-neutral umbrella.

WirelessHART was approved by a vote of the 210 member general HCF membership, ratified by the HCF Board of Directors, introduced to the market in September 2007. On September 27, 2007, the Fieldbus Foundation, Profibus Nutzerorganisation, HCF announced a wireless cooperation team to develop a specification for a common interface to a wireless gateway, further protecting users' investments in technology and work practices for leveraging these industry-pervasive networks. Following its completed work on the WirelessHART standard in September 2007, the HCF offered International Society of Automation an unrestricted, royalty-free copyright license, allowing the ISA100 committee access to the WirelessHART standard. Backward compatibility with the HART “user layer” allows transparent adaptation of HART compatible control systems and configuration tools to integrate new wireless networks and their devices, as well as continued use of proven configuration and system-integration work practices, it is estimated that 25 million HART field devices are installed worldwide, 3 million new wired HART devices are shipping each year.

In September 2008, Emerson became the first process automation supplier to begin production shipments for its WirelessHART enabled products. During the summer of 2009 NAMUR, an international user association in the chemical and pharmaceutical processing industries, conducted a field test of WirelessHART to verify alignment with the NAMUR requirements for wireless automation in process applications. WirelessHart was approved by the International Electrotechnical Commission in January 2009 with revision released in April 2010; the latest edition, version 2, was released in 2016 as IEC/PAS 62591:2016. HART Communications Foundation official website NAMUR AwiaTech WirelessHART Introductory Blog Emerson's SMART wireless site IEC Webstore for IEC 62591:2016

Campbell West-Watson

Campbell West-Watson was successively an Anglican suffragan bishop, diocesan bishop and archbishop over a 40-year period during the first half of the 20th century. Born on 23 April 1877 he was educated at Birkenhead School and Emmanuel College, Cambridge before being ordained Priest in 1903. After six years as Chaplain and Lecturer at his old college he was appointed Bishop of Barrow-in-Furness in 1909. After 16 years he was translated to New Zealand. In 1940 he was additionally appointed to be the Archbishop and Primate of the whole country, serving until 1951. Described in his Times obituary as "a man of great approachability and unaffected goodness" he died on 19 May 1953. In 1935, West-Watson was awarded the King George V Silver Jubilee Medal, he was appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George in the 1952 Queen's Birthday Honours

List of honours of the Belgian royal family by country

This article serves as an index - as complete as possible - of all the honorific orders or similar decorations received by the Belgian Royal Family, classified by continent, awarding country and recipient. King Philippe: Became Grand Cordon of the Order of Leopold in 1990.2013: Sovereign of the Order of Leopold 2013: Sovereign of the Order of the African Star, Order of the Lion, Order of the Crown and the Order of Leopold II. Queen Mathilde: 2000: Grand Cordon of the Order of Leopold Princess Elisabeth, Duchess of Brabant: 2019: Grand Cordon of the Order of Leopold King Albert II: 1993-2013: Sovereign of the Order of Leopold 1993-2013: Sovereign of the Order of the African Star, Order of the Lion, Order of the Crown and the Order of Leopold II. Queen Paola: 1994: Grand Cordon of the Order of Leopold Princess Astrid: 1997: Grand Cordon of the Order of Leopold Prince Lorenz, Archduke of Austria-Este: 2000: Grand Cordon of the Order of Leopold Prince Laurent: 1993: Grand Cordon of the Order of Leopold Princess Claire: 2004: Grand Cordon of the Order of Leopold King Philippe: Knight of the Order of the Elephant Queen Mathilde: Knight of the Order of the Elephant.

King Albert II: Knight of the Order of the Elephant Queen Paola: Knight of the Order of the Elephant King Philippe: Grand Cross of the Order of the White Rose of Finland Queen Mathilde: Grand Cross of the Order of the White Rose of Finland King Albert II: Grand Cross with Collar of the Order of the White Rose of Finland Queen Paola: Grand Cross of the Order of the White Rose of Finland King Albert II: Grand Cross of the Order of the Falcon King Philippe: Grand Cross of the Royal Norwegian Order of Saint Olav Queen Mathilde: Grand Cross of the Royal Norwegian Order of Saint Olav King Albert II: Grand Cross with Collar of the Royal Norwegian Order of Saint Olav Queen Paola: Grand Cross of the Royal Norwegian Order of Saint Olav Princess Astrid: Grand Cross of the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit Prince Lorenz, Archduke of Austria-Este: Grand Cross of the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit Prince Laurent: Grand Cross of the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit Princess Claire: Grand Cross of the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit King Philippe: Knight of the Royal Order of the Seraphim Queen Mathilde: Commander Grand Cross of the Order of the Polar Star King Albert II: Knight with Collar of the Royal Order of the Seraphim Queen Paola: Member of the Royal Order of the Seraphim Princess Astrid: Commander Grand Cross of the Order of the Polar Star Prince Lorenz, Archduke of Austria-Este: Commander Grand Cross of the Order of the Polar Star Prince Laurent: Commander Grand Cross of the Order of the Polar Star King Albert II: Collar of the Order of the Cross of Terra Mariana Queen Paola: Member 1st Class of the Order of the Cross of Terra Mariana King Albert II: Commander Grand Cross with Chain of the Order of Three Stars Queen Paola: Commander Grand Cross of the Order of Three Stars King Albert II: Grand Cross with the Golden Chain of the Order of Vytautas the Great Queen Paola: Grand Cross of the Order of Vytautas the Great King Albert II: Honorary Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian OrderRecipient of Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal King Philippe: Knight of the Order of the Gold Lion of the House of Nassau Queen Mathilde: Grand Cross of the Order of Adolphe of Nassau Knight of the Order of the Gold Lion of the House of Nassau King Albert II: Knight of the Order of the Gold Lion of the House of Nassau Queen Paola: Knight of the Order of the Gold Lion of the House of Nassau Princess Astrid: Grand Cross of the Order of Adolphe of Nassau Prince Lorenz, Archduke of Austria-Este: Grand Cross of the Order of Adolphe of Nassau Prince Laurent: Grand Cross of the Order of Adolphe of Nassau King Philippe: Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Netherlands Lion, 2016 Knight Grand Cross of the Order of Orange-Nassau Queen Mathilde: Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Netherlands Lion, 2016 Knight Grand Cross of the Order of Orange-Nassau King Albert II: Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Netherlands Lion Queen Paola: Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Netherlands Lion Knight of the Order of the Gold Lion of the House of Nassau Princess Astrid: Grand Cross of the Order of the Crown Prince Lorenz, Archduke of Austria-Este: Grand Cross of the Order of the Crown Prince Laurent: Grand Cross of the Order of the Crown Princess Claire: Grand Cross of the Order of the Crown King Albert II: Grand Star of the Decoration for Services to the Republic of Austria Queen Paola: Grand Star of the Decoration for Services to the Republic of Austria King Philippe: 1,328th Knight of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece King Albert II: 1,292nd Knight of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece Prince Lorenz, Archduke of Austria-Este: 1,285th Knight of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece King Philippe: Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour Queen Mathilde: Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour King Albert II: Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour Queen Paola: Grand Cross of the Order of National Merit King Albert II: Knight of the Order of Saint Michael King Philippe: Grand Cross Special Class of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany Queen Mathilde: Grand Cross Special Class of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany King Albert II: Grand Cross Special Class of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany Queen Paola: Grand Cross Special Class of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany Princess Astrid: Grand Cross 1st Class of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany Prince Lorenz, Archduke of Austria-Este: Grand Cross 1st Class of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany Prince Laurent: Grand Cross 1st class of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany King Philippe: Grand Cross of the Order of Honour King Albert II: Grand Cros