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Diekirch

Diekirch is a commune with town status in north-eastern Luxembourg, capital city of the canton Diekirch and, until its abolition in 2015, the district of Diekirch. The town is situated on the banks of the Sauer river; the town's heraldic shield, showing a crowned lion on a castle, was granted in 1988. It is based on the town's 14th century seal and arms; as of 2001, the town of Diekirch itself, which lies in the south of the commune, has a population of 6,068. Diekirch was the first town in Luxembourg to have a pedestrian zone, in 1977. Diekirch is home to a brewery of national importance carrying the town's name. Three secondary schools are located in Diekirch: Lycée classique de Diekirch, Lycée technique hôtelier Alexis Heck and Nordstadlycée; the town is home to the national operational headquarters of the Luxembourgish Army at the Haerebierg Military Centre and the National Museum of Military History, reflecting Diekirch's pivotal role in the famous Battle of the Bulge, called by the Germans Rundstedt-Offensive, a major battle of World War II.

It was here that the river Sauer was crossed on the night of January 18, 1945, by the US 5th Infantry division. The town is the seat of one of the six regional headquarters of the Grand Ducal Police and of one of the two judicial districts of Luxembourg; as far as sports events are concerned, Diekirch has gained a reputation for its annual cross country running competition — the Eurocross —, an IAAF permit meeting and attracts world-class runners, with Gabriela Szabo and Irina Mikitenko among its past winners. The town received its name, according to old sources, when Charlemagne in the late 8th century resettled Saxons, in order to bring them under his control. One of the centre of these settlements was in the area of Diekirch. In order to convert the pagan Saxons to Christianity, a church was built, which gave the settlement its name: "Diet-Kirch". In Old Franconian, thiuda. Þeudō is a reconstructed word from Germanic, which plays a role in the etymology of the term "Deutsch". In the 14th century, the blind king of Bohemia, fortified it, surrounding the place with a castellated wall and a ditch supplied by a stream.

It remained more or less fortified until the beginning of the 19th century when the French, during their occupation, levelled the old walls and substituted avenues of trees. In the course of extensive excavation in the 1960s, it was shown that the St. Laurence church is a Roman building. In the early 20th century, wall ruins and mosaics were being found north of the town center. Archaeological investigations in 1992-1993, 1999 and 2008 enabled the reconstruction of a large Roman villa, which extended over all the land of the medieval town and was abandoned in the early 5th century; the town's mascot is the donkey. There is a donkey fountain in the centre of Diekirch; the yearly cavalcade is held under the sign of the donkey. Paul Eyschen a Luxembourgish politician, statesman and diplomat, he was the eighth Prime Minister of Luxembourg, serving for twenty-seven years, 1888-1915. Léon Roth a Luxembourgian sprint canoer who competed in the 1952 Summer Olympics Johnny Lucas a Luxembourgian sprint canoer who competed in the 1952 Summer Olympics Ali Kaes a Luxembourgish politician General Gaston Reinig a Luxembourgian soldier and a former Chief of Defence of the Luxembourg Army Michael Pinto a Portuguese professional footballer Diekirch is twinned with: Media related to Diekirch at Wikimedia Commons Official website

North Western of Uruguay Railway

The North Western of Uruguay Railway was one of the five original rail systems in Uruguay. The other four were the Midland Uruguay, the Central Uruguay, the Uruguay Northern, the Uruguay East Coast Railway; the North Western of Uruguay Railway Company, Ltd. was registered In London in 1882. The North Western system consisted of 182 kilometres of standard gauge railway, extending from Salto, the terminus of the Midland Uruguay Railway, in a general northerly direction to Palomas, where connections were made with the Uruguay Northern Railway, Cuareim, opposite Barra do Quaraí, Brazil. Salto is opposite Concordia, Argentina, an important railway center located on the Entre Rios and Argentine North Eastern Railway lines, some traffic was interchanged. At Cuareim, an international bridge was constructed and a third rail laid for connections with the Brazil Great Southern Railway, which ran from Quarahim, northward; the North Western operated triweekly passenger-train service in both directions between Salto and Quarahim.

Connections could be made with trains for Uruguaiana and other points in southern Brazil. It served stations at Salto, Las Vinas, San Antonio, Palomas, Santa Ana, Isla Cabellos, Zanja Honda, Santa Rosa, Port Cuareim, its major bridge traverses were over the Arapey Grande River, Lake Arapey, Jacuy. Less than a year after its founding, Railway News reported in June 16, 1883 that the company directors, in their report for the ten months during which they had held office, stated that, owing to the publication of an unfounded telegram that a revolution had broken out in Uruguay, only £88,115 out of the £340,000 debentures for which they asked subscriptions were placed; the directors resolved to clear off, as far as possible, the liabilities which they had taken over from the North Western Railway of Monte Video Company, to put the existing line in good working order, to proceed with the extension as far as Isla Cabellos, having thus given proofs to the Uruguayan Government that the company intended faithfully to carry out their agreement with them, to ask them to grant an extension of time for completing the railway to Santa Rosa.

An application was made to the Government to give the company an eighteen months extension. Regarding the works upon the existing line, the railway superintendent reported that they are in good shape, that an new station, with the necessary goods and sheds was built at the Port of Salto to take the place of the old terminus, inconveniently situated about 2 km inland

Forest River, North Dakota

Forest River is a city in Walsh County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 125 at the 2010 census. Forest River was founded in 1887. Forest River is located at 48°13′5″N 97°28′7″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.50 square miles, all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 125 people, 55 households, 31 families living in the city; the population density was 250.0 inhabitants per square mile. There were 59 housing units at an average density of 118.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 0.8 % from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.0% of the population. There were 55 households of which 20.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.1% were married couples living together, 5.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.8% had a male householder with no wife present, 43.6% were non-families. 34.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older.

The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 3.00. The median age in the city was 43.2 years. 20% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 46.4 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 154 people, 59 households, 42 families living in the city; the population density was 305.9 people per square mile. There were 68 housing units at an average density of 135.1 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 99.35% White, 0.65% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.69% of the population. There were 59 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.8% were non-families. 27.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.07. In the city, the population was spread out with 31.2% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 24.7% from 25 to 44, 23.4% from 45 to 64, 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 81.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males. As of 2000 the median income for a household was $31,250, the median income for a family was $30,833. Males had a median income of $33,125 versus $21,250 for females; the per capita income for the city was $14,698. About 4.8% of families and 9.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.9% of those under the age of eighteen and 10.0% of those sixty five or over