Enamelled glass

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Luck of Edenhall, a 13th century enamelled glass cup made in Syria or Egypt

Enamelled glass is glass which has been decorated with vitreous enamel (powdered glass, possibly mixed with a binder) and then fired to fuse the glasses. It can produce brilliant and long-lasting colours, and be transparent, translucent or opaque.

It is similar to vitreous enamel on metal surfaces, but the supporting surface is glass.

Techniques[edit]

Japanese enamel made using the musen shippō (無線七宝) technique; wire is used to locate the glass, but then removed before firing.

Glass may be enamelled by sprinkling a loose powder on a flat surface, painting or printing a slurry, or painting or stamping a binder and then sprinkling it with powder, which will adhere.[1] As with enamel on metal, gum tragacanth may be used to make sharp edges.

Some modern techniques are much simpler than historic ones.[2] For instance, there now exist glass enamel pens.[3]

Enamelled glass is often used in combination with gilding. Mica may also be added for sparkle.[1]

Venetian enamelled glass was called smalto.[citation needed]

Uses[edit]

Mosque lamps are made of enamelled glass. They generally have lugs, from which they are suspended to light not only mosques, but also similar spaces such as madrassas and mausoleums.[4] They have a religious symbolism based on the Quranic verse of light, with which they are often calligraphed.[5]

During the European Renaissance, expensive enamelled goblets were used as courtship and marriage gifts. These goblets were rarely used, and some have survived.[6]

Glass painting involves painting on glass, with glass, making the finished work transparent.[citation needed] Glass fusing is similar, but powders are not mixed into a paintable paste first; however, the result is similar.[7][better source needed]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "How to Enamel". glass-fusing-made-easy.com. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  2. ^ "All About Glass - Corning Museum of Glass". www.cmog.org. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  3. ^ http://images.delphiglass.com/assets/Free%20EBook%20-221524.pdf
  4. ^ User, Super. "Mosque Lamp". www.mia.org.qa. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  5. ^ Collection, The Wallace. "The Wallace Collection - What's On - Treasure of the Month". www.wallacecollection.org. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  6. ^ "Goblet - V&A Search the Collections". collections.vam.ac.uk. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  7. ^ "Glass Fusing Classes". glassenamels. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  8. ^ "Examining the enamel on the Aldrevandini beaker". British Museum.