English mythology

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English mythology is the collection of myths that have emerged throughout the history of England, sometimes being elaborated upon by successive generations, and at other times being rejected and replaced by other explanatory narratives. These narratives consist of folk traditions developed in England after the Norman Conquest, integrated with traditions from Anglo-Saxon mythology, Christian mythology, and Celtic mythology. Elements of the Matter of Britain and Welsh mythology which relate directly to England are included, such as the foundation myth of Brutus of Troy and the Arthurian legends, but these are combined with narratives from the Matter of England and traditions from English folklore.

Notable figures and legends[edit]

Legacy of English mythology in English literature[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Birth of England: The Wessex Kings – Alfred the Great". BBC Online. 2004. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  2. ^ "King Arthur, 'Once and Future King'". BBC Online. 2017. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  3. ^ "Athelston: Introduction". University of Rochester. 1997. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  4. ^ "British Library Beowulf manuscript is star of BBC documentary". Culture24. 2009. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  5. ^ "The Travels of Sir Bevis of Hampton". Bevis of Hampton. 2015. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  6. ^ "Brutus of Troy". anthonyadolph.co.uk. 2015. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  7. ^ "Brutus of Troy". berkshirehistory.com. 2006. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  8. ^ "The Tale of Gamelyn: Introduction". University of Rochester. 1997. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  9. ^ "Sir Guy of Warwick". BBC Online. 2018. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  10. ^ "Havelok the Dane: Introduction". University of Rochester. 1997. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  11. ^ "Hengist and Horsa". English Monarchs. 2018. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  12. ^ "King Horn: Introduction". University of Rochester. 1997. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  13. ^ "Lady Godiva: The naked truth". BBC News. 2001. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  14. ^ "Why does Robin Hood keep coming back?". BBC Online. 2009. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  15. ^ "Sceafa was an ancient Lombardic king". John Learn. 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  16. ^ "St. Waltheof of Melrose". catholic.net. 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  17. ^ "Wayland the Smith". Encyclopædia Britannica. 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  18. ^ "Why do we love the legend of King Arthur?". BBC. 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  19. ^ "Men in Green". The Guardian. 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  20. ^ "Right Thinking". The Guardian. 2005. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  21. ^ "Shakespeare's histories are no more than legends, but they live". The Daily Telegraph. 2012. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  22. ^ "The Hobbit unearths a hoard of myths". The Daily Telegraph. 2012. Retrieved 12 March 2018.

External links[edit]