Eugene Emeralds

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Eugene Emeralds
Founded in 1955
Eugene, Oregon
Eugene Emeralds.PNG Eugene Emeralds cap.PNG
Team logo Cap insignia
Class-level
Current Class A-Short Season
(1974–present)
Previous
  • AAA (1969–1973)
  • Short-season A (1966–1968)
  • A (1963–1965)
  • B (1955–1962)
Minor league affiliations
League Northwest League
(1955–1968, 1974–present)
Division South Division
Previous leagues
Pacific Coast League (PCL)
(1969–1973)
Major league affiliations
Current Chicago Cubs (2015–present)
Previous
Minor league titles
League titles (5)
  • 1955
  • 1974
  • 1975
  • 1980
  • 2016
Division titles (15)
  • 1955
  • 1957
  • 1964
  • 1969
  • 1974
  • 1975
  • 1978
  • 1980
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1996
  • 2000
  • 2011
  • 2016
  • 2017
Team data
Nickname Emeralds (1955–present)
Colors Black, dark green, neon green, white
                   
Mascot Sluggo [1]
Ballpark PK Park (2010–present)
Previous parks
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
David Elmore (Elmore Sports Group)
Manager Steven Lerud
General Manager Allan Benavides

The Eugene Emeralds (nicknamed the Ems) are a minor league baseball team in the northwest United States, based in Eugene, Oregon. Members of the Northwest League, they are currently the Class A short-season affiliate of the Chicago Cubs,[2] from 2001 through 2014, the team was affiliated with the San Diego Padres.

History[edit]

Created 63 years ago in 1955 as a charter member of the Northwest League, the Emeralds were named in a contest, won in January by eleven-year-old Bowen Blair,[3] they won the inaugural pennant as an independent,[4][5][6] and remained in the NWL for 14 seasons, through 1968.

The Emeralds played in northwest Eugene in 4,000-seat Bethel Park, at Roosevelt Boulevard and Maple Street (44°03′52″N 123°08′43″W / 44.0644°N 123.1454°W / 44.0644; -123.1454), later torn down for the construction of a highway that wasn't built.[6][7][8] In 1950 and 1951, Bethel Park was the home of the Eugene Larks of the Class D Far West League; its outfield is present-day Lark Park. Its final game in 1968 on August 29 drew 897 fans for a one-hitter and a 7-0 Emeralds win,[9] the NWL changed to a short season league in 1966, and that season opened in Eugene against the Lewiston Broncs. The second pick in the 1966 MLB draft, future hall of famer Reggie Jackson played his first professional games at Bethel Park, as a 20-year-old center fielder, following his sophomore season at Arizona State. Hitless in the opener,[10][11] the next game he got his first pro hit, a single in the first, and later a home run to right field in the ninth.[12][13]

In the 1969 season, the Emeralds were promoted to AAA status in the Pacific Coast League (PCL) as the primary affiliate of the Philadelphia Phillies, the Ems returned to the Northwest League five years later, when the Phillies moved their AAA farm team to the Toledo Mud Hens of the International League for the 1974 season. Eugene was independent that season, then became an affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds in 1975.

As a Triple A team in 1969, the Emeralds moved from Bethel Park to Civic Stadium, the 6,800-seat facility was owned by the Eugene School District and was built in 1938 as a venue for high school football, which was played there until 1968. Civic Stadium also hosted semi-pro baseball teams, sponsored by local timber companies, until Bethel Park was built in 1950. Facing an outdated stadium and high-maintenance costs,[14] the Eugene Emeralds moved into the new baseball stadium across town that was built by the University of Oregon, PK Park. A vacant Civic Stadium was destroyed by fire in 2015,[15] several years after the Emeralds had been playing at PK Park, the Emeralds new home, PK Park, is adjacent to Autzen Stadium and near the Willamette River. They share the new facility with the Oregon Ducks, whose regular season ends in May.

In 2009, playing for the Emeralds, Nate Freiman led the league for the season in RBIs (68), extra-base hits (33) and total bases (140).[16]

A new logo, based upon Sasquatch, was adopted by the Emeralds in 2012;[17] in 2013, the Emeralds partnered with Voodoo Doughnut to offer a bacon maple bratwurst as a specialty food item.[18] Following the 2014 season, the Emeralds switched from being an affiliate of the San Diego Padres to the Chicago Cubs, who signed Eugene to a two-year deal through 2016,[19] the player development contract was extended through the 2018 season on June 14, 2016.

Playoffs[edit]

  • 2017: Defeated Hillsboro 2-0 in semifinals; Lost to Vancouver 3-1 in finals.
  • 2016: Defeated Hillsboro 2-1 in semifinals; defeated Everett 2-1 to win league championship.
  • 2011: Lost to Vancouver 2-1 in semifinals.
  • 2000: Lost to Yakima 3-2 in finals.
  • 1996: Lost to Yakima 2-0 in finals.
  • 1986: Lost to Bellingham 1-0 in finals.
  • 1985: Lost to Everett 1-0 in finals.
  • 1980: Declared co-champion with Bellingham.
  • 1979: Lost to Grays Harbor 1-0 in finals.
  • 1975: Defeated Portland 2-0 to win league championship.
  • 1974: Defeated Bellingham 2-1 to win league championship.

Notable alumni[edit]

Hall of Fame alumni

Notable alumni

See also[edit]

Roster[edit]

Eugene Emeralds roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 46 Luis Aquino
  • -- Casey Bloomquist
  • -- Enrique De Los Rios
  • -- Brad Markey
  • -- Jose Rosario
  • 18 Casey Ryan
  • -- Kyle Ryan
  • 41 Carson Sands
  • 45 Jake Steffens

Catchers


Infielders

  • 40 Gustavo Polanco
  • 30 Ramsey Romano

Outfielders

  •  5 Jose Gonzalez
  • -- Daniel Spingola


Manager

Coaches

  • -- Armando Gabino (pitching)
  • -- Osmin Melendez (hitting)
  • -- Jacob Rogers (assistant coach)


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Chicago Cubs 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated April 16, 2018
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Northwest League
Chicago Cubs minor league players

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Meet Sluggo". 
  2. ^ Smith, Jeff (September 19, 2014). "Eugene Emeralds rejoin Chicago Cubs organization as Northwest League affiliate". The Oregonian. Retrieved November 5, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Eugene Emeralds". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). January 24, 1955. p. 2B. 
  4. ^ Strite, Dick (September 13, 1955). "Championship club could set new pattern in minor leagues". Eugene Register-Guard. p. 1A. 
  5. ^ Strite, Dick (September 13, 1955). "Emeralds claim Northwest crown". Eugene Register-Guard. p. 2B. 
  6. ^ a b Rodman, Bob (June 17, 1981). "29 years of minor league baseball". Eugene Register-Guard. p. 1E. 
  7. ^ "State buys Bethel baseball park". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. October 24, 1969. p. 16A. 
  8. ^ Clark, Bob (June 29, 2004). "Deep and playable". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. Emeralds at 50. p. E1. 
  9. ^ Harvey, Paul, III (August 30, 1968). "Ballinger 1-hits Giants in 7-0 Emerald win". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. p. 3B. 
  10. ^ "Eugene Emeralds outlast Broncs 8-7 in 10 innings". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Idaho. June 25, 1966. p. 8. 
  11. ^ Harvey, Paul, III (June 25, 1966). "Emeralds corral Broncs just in time". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. p. 1B. 
  12. ^ "Lewiston defeats Emeralds behind Abbot's 7-hitter". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Idaho. June 26, 1966. p. 12. 
  13. ^ Harvey, Paul, III (June 26, 1966). "Emeralds handed first loss". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. p. 1B. 
  14. ^ "Eugene Emeralds say hello -- and prepare to say goodbye -- to Civic Stadium". Retrieved 2016-09-06. 
  15. ^ "3 boys get probation for fire that leveled Eugene's Civic Stadium". Retrieved 2016-09-06. 
  16. ^ Jonathan Mayo (December 4, 2009). "Plenty of potential among Padres' Draft picks". Sandiego.padres.mlb.com. Retrieved March 12, 2013. 
  17. ^ Mickler, Lauren (November 27, 2012). "Eugene Emeralds Unveil New Logo". KEZI. Retrieved November 5, 2014. 
  18. ^ "Eugene Emeralds + Voodoo Doughnut = Bacon Maple Brat". KVAL-TV. 2013. Retrieved November 5, 2014. 
  19. ^ Timmers, Josh (2014-09-19). "Cubs Sign 2-Year Affiliation With Eugene Emeralds". Bleed Cubbie Blue. Retrieved 2016-09-06. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Ems facts". The Register-Guard. July 22, 2001. Retrieved 26 May 2011. 
  21. ^ Jesus Alou Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  22. ^ Jose Cardenal Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  23. ^ Bruce Chen Minor & Winter Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  24. ^ Nate Freiman Minor, Fall, Independent & Mexican Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  25. ^ Oscar Gamble Winter & Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  26. ^ Khalil Greene Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  27. ^ Bob Hamelin Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  28. ^ Ian Happ Minor & Fall Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  29. ^ Larry Hisle Minor & Winter Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  30. ^ Jay Howell Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  31. ^ Grant Jackson Minor & Winter Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  32. ^ Charlie Leibrandt Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  33. ^ Mike Marshall Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  34. ^ Brian McRae Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  35. ^ Willie Montanez Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  36. ^ John Rocker Minor & Independent Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  37. ^ Jeff Russell Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  38. ^ a b Mario Soto Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  39. ^ Trea Turner Fall & Minor Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  40. ^ Cory Spangenberg Minor, Fall & Winter Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  41. ^ Hunter Renfroe Minor & Fall Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  42. ^ Jace Peterson Minor & Fall Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com
  43. ^ Kevin Quackenbush Minor & Fall Leagues Statistics & History | Baseball-Reference.com

External links[edit]