European Cultural Convention

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European Cultural Convention
CET 18
Signed19 December 1954
LocationParis
Effective5 May 1955
Condition3 Ratifications
Signatories19[1]
Parties50[1]
DepositarySecretary General of the Council of Europe
LanguagesEnglish and French

The European Cultural Convention is an international treaty for EU and EU accession states to strengthen, deepen and further develop a European Culture, by using local culture as a starting point, setting common goals and a plan of action, to reach an integrated European society, celebrating universal values, rights and diversity.[2]

The European Cultural Convention was opened for signature by the Council of Europe in Paris on 19 December 1954.[1] Its signature is one of the conditions for becoming a participating state in the Bologna Process and its European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The term "Convention" is used as a synonym for an international legal treaty.

The convention has been ratified by all 47 member states of the Council of Europe; it has also been ratified by Belarus, the Holy See, and Kazakhstan.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "European Cultural Convention, CETS No.: 018". Council of Europe. 18 January 2013. Retrieved 21 January 2013.
  2. ^ https://www.coe.int/en/web/conventions/full-list/-/conventions/treaty/018