Finland women's national ice hockey team

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Finland
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Naisleijonat (Lady Lions)
Association Finnish Ice Hockey Association
Head coach Pasi Mustonen
Assistants Juuso Toivola
Captain Jenni Hiirikoski
Most games Karoliina Rantamäki (256)
Most points Riikka Nieminen (204)
IIHF code FIN
Finland national hockey team jerseys - 2014 Winter Olympics.pngFinland national hockey team jerseys 2014.png
Ranking
Current IIHF 3 Steady
Highest IIHF 3 (first in 2003)
Lowest IIHF 4 (first in 2006)
First international
 Finland 6–0 Norway 
(Copenhagen, Denmark; 26 December 1988)
Biggest win
 Finland 34–0 Czechoslovakia 
(Düsseldorf, West Germany; 4 April 1989)
Biggest defeat
 Canada 15–0 Finland 
(St. John's, Canada; 12 November 2010)
World Championships
Appearances 18 (first in 1990)
Best result Bronze medal world centered-2.svg Bronze: (1990, 1992, 1994, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2015, 2017)
European Championships
Appearances 5 (first in 1989)
Best result Gold medal europe.svg Gold: (1989, 1991, 1993, 1995)
Olympics
Appearances 6 (first in 1998)
Medals Bronze medal.svg Bronze (1998, 2010, 2018)
International record (W–L–T)
198–169–12
Finland women's national ice hockey team
Medal record
Olympic Games
Bronze medal – third place 1998 Nagano Team
Bronze medal – third place 2010 Vancouver Team
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Pyeongchang Team
World Championships
Bronze medal – third place 1990 Canada
Bronze medal – third place 1992 Finland
Bronze medal – third place 1994 United States
Bronze medal – third place 1997 Canada
Bronze medal – third place 1999 Finland
Bronze medal – third place 2000 Canada
Bronze medal – third place 2004 Canada
Bronze medal – third place 2008 China
Bronze medal – third place 2009 Finland
Bronze medal – third place 2011 Switzerland
Bronze medal – third place 2015 Sweden
Bronze medal – third place 2017 United States
European Championships
Gold medal – first place 1989 West Germany
Gold medal – first place 1991 Czechoslovakia
Gold medal – first place 1993 Denmark
Gold medal – first place 1995 Latvia
Bronze medal – third place 1996 Russia

The Finnish women's national ice hockey team represents Finland at the International Ice Hockey Federation's IIHF World Women's Championships. The women's national team is controlled by the Finnish Ice Hockey Association. Finland has 5,950 female players in 2016.[1]

Finnish national women's ice hockey team at the Women's Air Canada Cup 2008 in Ravensburg, Germany.

History[edit]

Finland has finished third or fourth in almost every World Championships and Olympics, with one exception being a 5th place finish at the 2014 Winter Olympics. They are ranked behind Canada (#1) and the USA (#2). Finland's main rival is Sweden, which finished second to Canada at the 2006 Winter Olympics. Finland finished fourth, losing the game for the bronze medal to the USA. Finland defeated the USA for the first time, in the 2008 World Championship in China, 2–1 after overtime. Finland defeated Canada 4-3 for the first time at the 2017 World Championship in the United States. However, they lost the semifinal against Canada in the same tournament, so the Finns were relegated to the bronze medal game.

Tournament record[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

Games Finish
Japan 1998 Nagano  Bronze
United States 2002 Salt Lake City 4th
Italy 2006 Turin 4th
Canada 2010 Vancouver  Bronze
Russia 2014 Sochi 5th
South Korea 2018 Pyeongchang  Bronze
China 2022 Beijing To be determined

World Championships[edit]

Year Location Result
Canada 1990 Ottawa  Bronze
Finland 1992 Tampere  Bronze
United States 1994 Lake Placid  Bronze
Canada 1997 Ontario  Bronze
Finland 1999 Espoo  Bronze
Canada 2000 Ontario  Bronze
United States 2001 Minnesota 4th
Canada 2004 Halifax and Dartmouth  Bronze
Sweden 2005 Linköping and Norrköping 4th
Canada 2007 Winnipeg and Selkirk 4th
China 2008 Harbin  Bronze
Finland 2009 Hämeenlinna  Bronze
Switzerland 2011 Zurich  Bronze
United States 2012 Burlington 4th
Canada 2013 Ottawa 4th
Sweden 2015 Malmö  Bronze
Canada 2016 Kamloops 4th
United States 2017 Plymouth  Bronze
Finland 2019 Espoo

European Championship[edit]

Year Location Result
West Germany 1989 Füssen, Landsberg and Kaufbeuren  Gold
Czechoslovakia 1992 Frydek-Mistek, Havirov  Gold
Denmark 1994 Esbjerg  Gold
Latvia 1997 Riga  Gold
Russia 1999 Yaroslavl  Bronze

3/4 Nations Cup[edit]

  • 1995 – Finished in 4th place (4 Nations Cup)
  • 1996 – Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 1997 – Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 1998 – Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 1999 – Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 2000 – Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (4 nations Cup)
  • 2001 – Won Silver Medal Silver medal icon.svg
  • 2002 – Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2003 – Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2004 – Finished in 4th place (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2005 – Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2006 – Finished in 4th place (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2007Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2008 – Finished in 4th place (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2009 – Finished in 4th place (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2010Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2011 – Finished in 4th place (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2012 – Finished in 4th place (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2013Won Silver Medal Silver medal icon.svg (4 nations Cup)
  • 2014 – Finished in 4th place (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2015Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2016Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (4 Nations Cup)
  • 2017Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (4 Nations Cup)

Women's Nations Cup[edit]

Formerly known as the Air Canada Cup, the MLP Nations Cup and the Meco Cup.

  • 2003Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (Air Canada Cup)
  • 2004 – Finished in 4th place (Air Canada Cup)
  • 2005Won Silver Medal Silver medal icon.svg (Air Canada Cup)
  • 2006Won Silver Medal Silver medal icon.svg (Air Canada Cup)
  • 2007 – Finished in 6th place (Air Canada Cup)
  • 2008Won Silver Medal Silver medal icon.svg (Air Canada Cup)
  • 2009 – Finished in 5th place ( MLP Nations Cup)
  • 2010 – Finished in 5th place ( MLP Nations Cup)
  • 2011 – Finished in 6th place ( MLP Nations Cup)
  • 2012Won Silver Medal Silver medal icon.svg (Meco Cup)
  • 2013Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (Meco Cup)
  • 2014Won Gold Medal Gold medal icon.svg (Meco Cup)
  • 2015Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (Meco Cup)
  • 2016Won Silver Medal Silver medal icon.svg (Women's Nations Cup)
  • 2017Won Gold Medal Gold medal icon.svg (Women's Nations Cup)
  • 2018Won Bronze Medal Bronze medal icon.svg (Women's Nations Cup)

Canada Cup[edit]

  • 2009 Canada Cup – Won Bronze Medal

Current roster[edit]

The Finnish roster for the women's ice hockey tournament at the 2018 Winter Olympics was published on 22 January 2018.[2][3]

Head coach: Finland Pasi Mustonen Assistant coaches: Finland Juuso Toivola

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2017–18 team
1 G Eveliina Suonpää 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in) 64 kg (141 lb) 12 April 1995 Kiukainen Finland Lukko (Liiga)
2 D Isa Rahunen 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 66 kg (146 lb) 16 April 1993 Kuopio Finland Kärpät (Liiga)
4 D Rosa Lindstedt 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) 80 kg (180 lb) 24 January 1988 Ylöjärvi Sweden HV71 (SWHL)
6 D Jenni HiirikoskiC 1.61 m (5 ft 3 in) 62 kg (137 lb) 30 March 1987 Lempäälä Sweden Luleå HF (SWHL)
7 D Mira Jalosuo 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 80 kg (180 lb) 3 February 1989 Lieksa Finland Kärpät (Liiga)
8 D Ella Viitasuo 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 66 kg (146 lb) 27 May 1996 Lahti Finland Blues (Liiga)
9 F Venla Hovi 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 67 kg (148 lb) 28 October 1987 Tampere Canada Univ. of Manitoba (CWUAA)
10 F Linda Välimäki 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) 72 kg (159 lb) 31 May 1990 Ylöjärvi Finland Ilves (Liiga)
11 F Annina Rajahuhta 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 69 kg (152 lb) 8 March 1989 Helsinki China Kunlun Red Star (CWHL)
13 F Riikka VäliläA 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 60 kg (130 lb) 12 June 1973 Jyväskylä Sweden HV71 (SWHL)
15 D Minnamari Tuominen 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 71 kg (157 lb) 26 June 1990 Helsinki Finland Blues (Liiga)
18 G Meeri Räisänen 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 62 kg (137 lb) 2 December 1989 Tampere Finland HPK (Liiga)
19 F Petra Nieminen 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 64 kg (141 lb) 4 May 1999 Tampere Finland Team Kuortane (Liiga)
22 F Emma Nuutinen 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 73 kg (161 lb) 7 December 1996 Vantaa United States Mercyhurst University (NCAA)
23 F Sanni Hakala 1.53 m (5 ft 0 in) 56 kg (123 lb) 31 October 1997 Jyväskylä Sweden HV71 (SWHL)
24 F Noora Tulus 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 67 kg (148 lb) 15 August 1995 Vantaa Sweden Luleå HF (SWHL)
26 F Sara Säkkinen 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 61 kg (134 lb) 7 April 1998 Tampere Finland Team Kuortane (Liiga)
27 F Saila Saari 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 62 kg (137 lb) 1 November 1989 Alavus Finland Kärpät (Liiga)
33 F Michelle KarvinenA 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 70 kg (150 lb) 27 March 1990 Rødovre, Denmark Sweden Luleå HF (SWHL)
41 G Noora Räty 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 65 kg (143 lb) 29 May 1989 Espoo China Kunlun Red Star (CWHL)
61 F Tanja Niskanen 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 69 kg (152 lb) 9 November 1992 Juankoski Finland KalPa (Liiga)
77 F Susanna Tapani 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 60 kg (130 lb) 2 March 1993 Laitila Finland Lukko (Liiga)
88 D Ronja Savolainen 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 70 kg (150 lb) 29 November 1997 Helsinki Sweden Luleå HF (SWHL)

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Kirsi Hanninen, Directorate Award, Best Defender, 1999 IIHF Women's World Championship[4]
  • Jenni Hiirikoski, Directorate Award, Best Defender, 2009 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships[5]
  • Noora Räty, Most Valuable Player, 2008 IIHF Women's World Hockey Championships[6]
  • Noora Räty, Best Goalie, 2007 IIHF Women's World Hockey Championships
  • Noora Räty, Best Goalie, 2008 IIHF Women's World Hockey Championships[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Profile
  2. ^ "Suomi naisten olympiaturnaukseen tällä joukkueella!". Leijonat.fi (in Finnish). 22 January 2018. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  3. ^ Team Roster Finland
  4. ^ Collins gem Hockey Facts and Stats 2009–10, p.542, Andrew Podnieks, Harper Collins Publishers Ltd, Toronto, Canada, ISBN 978-1-55468-621-6
  5. ^ Awards
  6. ^ a b Collins gem Hockey Facts and Stats 2009–10, p. 546, Andrew Podnieks, Harper Collins Publishers Ltd, Toronto, Canada, ISBN 978-1-55468-621-6.

External links[edit]