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SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Flag of the Western Union

The Western Union was a military alliance established between France, the United Kingdom and the three Benelux countries between 1948 and 1954. The flag of the Western Union referred to as the Western Union Standard, displays an unbroken chain of five rectangular links Or in the shape of an upside-down pentagon on a blue field, with a multicoloured border taken from the WU member states' flags; the flag displays an unbroken chain of five rectangular links Or in the shape of an upside-down pentagon on a blue field, with a multicoloured border taken from the WU member states' flags. The relative proportions of the border are approximatively: Red 3, each of the others 1; the total width of the border is approximatively half that of the depth of the flag. The number of links symbolises the Western Union's five members; the flag was first seen in October 1949. The flag might have been introduced and used as a command flag of Commander in Chief Admiral of the Fleet Rhoderick McGrigor during Exercise Verity in 1949, the only major exercise held by the organisation.

The flag was flown on a car belonging to Bernard Montgomery, Chairman of the Commanders-in-Chief Committee. A photo of the flag is shown in the book entitled Badges on Battledress by Howard N. Cole; the original caption states:'NCOs of the Corps of Royal Military Police displaying the Western Union Standard which incorporates the badge of the Headquarters, Western Europe Commanders-in-Chief'. It doesn't say; the flag ceased to be used upon the creation of NATO's Headquarters, Allied Land Forces Central Europe in August 1953, at which point one extra link was added to the emblem, symbolising the United States. Similar to the Western Union, AFCENT was based in France. AFCENT was developed into Allied Joint Force Command Brunssum. Flag of the Western European Union Flag of NATO Flag of the European Coal and Steel Community Flag of Europe Federalist flag Flag of the Western Union, Flags of the World

Tadahiko Ueda

Tadahiko Ueda was a Japanese football player. He played for Japan national team. Ueda was born in Kyoto Prefecture on August 3, 1947. After graduating from Hosei University, he joined Nippon Steel in 1970, he was selected Best Eleven in first season. He retired in 1973, he scored 25 goals in the league. On August 2, 1970, Ueda debuted for Japan national team against South Korea. In December, he was selected Japan for 1970 Asian Games, he played at 1972 Summer Olympics qualification in 1971. This qualification was his last game for Japan, he played 13 games and scored 7 goals for Japan until 1971. On April 15, 2015, Ueda died of lung cancer at the age of 67. Japan Soccer League Best Eleven: 1970 Tadahiko Ueda at National-Football-Teams.com Japan National Football Team Database

Kingston High School (Tasmania)

Kingston High School is a co-educational high school in Kingston, Tasmania. The school teaches students in grades 7-10, has 700 students enrolled; the school is a six-stream school, with at least six class groups for each year level at the school. The current principal is Dr Libby Robinson. Kingston High School was opened on Saturday 2 December 1972 by the Minister for Education, Bill Neilson; the school had an initial enrolment of 168 students, with students coming from the rural townships surrounding Kingston. In 2000 student numbers peaked at 797 students, with enrolments declining over the next six years. From 2007, numbers have been growing again with the student population expected to continue to increase; the school needed to relocate from the old Kingston CBD campus to the new Kingston View Drive campus at the beginning of the 2011 school year. The new school campus was opened on 4 November 2011. Initial construction of the Kingston High School current campus was announced in 2007; the new campus is located in Kingston View Drive, next to the Kingborough Sports Centre in Kingston.

Construction on the project commenced in May 2009

Northeastern Huskies swimming and diving

The Northeastern University women's swimming and diving team debuted in the Fall of 1978 under the coaching staff of NU hall of fame member Janet Swanson. Since its inception, the Boston-based team has grown into one of the most respected and competitive Division I aquatics programs in New England. Northeastern was a member of the America East Conference from 1990 to 2005 and is a member of the Colonial Athletic Association. In 1993, former Dartmouth College Swimming head coach Roy Coates took over the Northeastern University program. Under Coates, the team built a solid foundation to set the tone for America East Conference dominance in the early 2000s; this included an undefeated 2001-02 season capped off by a final in season win over cross town rival Boston College. The team won the AE conference championship in 2000 and defended the title 5 years in a row until the University of New Hampshire narrowly broke its streak. During this time period NU was bolstered by a large group of versatile swimmers that broke an unprecedented 13 of the 15 school swimming records between 2002-2005.

These athletes included Katie Schmaling, Sarah Reddick, Kelly McIsaac, Jesse Coxson, Emily White, Katie Kane, Kristen Kane, Kerby Lewis. All five relay records were re-established during the 2004 season as well. Successful was the diving portion of the team coached by Brad Snodgrass. After following the lead of NU legends Katie Mailman and Jane deLima, Romania native Adela "Dea" Gavozdea dominated in her three-year tenure at NU qualifying for the NCAA championships 3 years in a row and was named the America East Most Outstanding Diver in the 2003-04 season. Official website

Kisaragi (film)

Kisaragi is a 2007 Japanese film directed by Yūichi Satō. One year after the suicide of C-list model Kisaragi Miki, five of her fans come together for a commemorative meeting, they come to the realization that her death did not occur the way they thought it did. The more they talk, the more the case takes shape in their minds, the closer they come to the truth. Teruyuki Kagawa as Ichigo Musume Keisuke Koide as Snake Shun Oguri as Iemoto Yūsuke Santamaria as Oda Yuji Muga Tsukaji as Yasuo Kanako Sakai as Kisaragi Miki Raiki Yonemoto as the childhood version of Yasuo in photos. Joe Shishido 50th Blue Ribbon Awards Won: Best Film Kisaragi on IMDb

William Terry Badham

William Terry Badham was a World War I fighter ace credited with five victories. He was one of four Americans to earn the title of "Ace" as an observer/gunner during World War I. Badham graduated from Yale in 1917, he joined the French air service. He served as a gunner/observer in several French observation squadrons. After training, he reported to the 210th Observation Squadron of the Fourth French Army near Metz, where he flew Latour and Breguet aircraft. In May 1918, he transferred to the Air Service, United States Army, was assigned to the First Army Air Service 91st Aero Squadron, an American observation unit flying Salmson 2A2s at Gondreville-sur-Moselle Aerodrome. Badham scored his first victory on 15 September 1918, his pilot was his commanding officer, George Kenney. For the next four, from 23 through 29 October 1918, it was Everett Cook. For his actions, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. On 29 October, he scored the last of five victories gained over the battlefields of Saint Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne.

First Lieutenant Badham remained with the 91st until January 1919. After World War I, William T. Badham established a small chemical business, Naphthalene Products Company, using the naphthalene gas from coke ovens in Birmingham to manufacture items which included mothballs and insecticides. A brigadier general during World War II, he served with the U. S. 8th Air Force in England and the Middle East. Drawing since he was ten years old, painting became an serious aspect of his life. By the age of fifty with his business successful, he was able to devote most of his time to painting while traveling over Europe and Mexico, he began to specialize in watercolor landscapes. His paintings have been exhibited in galleries in the United States and abroad. Distinguished Service Cross October 23, 1918The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to William T. Badham, First Lieutenant, U. S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action near Buzancy, October 23, 1918. First Lieutenant Badham gave proof of exceptional bravery while on a photographic mission 25 kilometers within the enemy lines.

His plane was attacked, by a formation of 30 enemy aircraft. By skillful work with his machine-gun, Lieutenant Badham repelled the attack and destroyed two German planes. At the same time he obtained photographs of great military value. Silver Star Citation September 15, 1918By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, Second Lieutenant William T. Badham, United States Army Air Service, is cited by the Commanding General, American Expeditionary Forces, for gallantry in action and a silver star may be placed upon the ribbon of the Victory Medals awarded him. Second Lieutenant Badham distinguished himself by gallantry in action while serving as an Observer with the 91st Aero Squadron, American Expeditionary Forces, in action near Metz, while on a photographic mission, 15 September 1918. General Orders: GHQ, American Expeditionary Forces, Citation Orders No. 1 Silver Star Citation October 29, 1918By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, First Lieutenant William T. Badham, United States Army Air Service, is cited by the Commanding General, American Expeditionary Forces, for gallantry in action and a silver star may be placed upon the ribbon of the Victory Medals awarded him.

First Lieutenant Badham distinguished himself by gallantry in action while serving as an Observer with the 91st Aero Squadron, American Expeditionary Forces, in action in the vicinity of Grand Pre, France, 29 October 1918, while on a patrol which secured valuable photographs. General Orders: GHQ, American Expeditionary Forces, Citation Orders No. 8 List of World War I flying aces from the United States Franks, Norman American Aces of World War 1. Illustrated by Harry Dempsey. Oxford: Osprey Publishing, ISBN 1-84176-375-6, ISBN 978-1-84176-375-0. "Eyes of the Eagle, The Exploits of Henry Lee Badham, Jr. and William Terry Badham in the AEF" Thomas E. Badham, Manuscript 1999. William Terry Badham at Find a Grave William Terry Badham @ theaerodrome.com