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Frances Densmore

Frances Theresa Densmore was an American anthropologist and ethnographer born in Red Wing, Minnesota. Densmore is known for her studies of Native American music and culture, in modern terms, she may be described as an ethnomusicologist; as a child Densmore developed an appreciation of music by listening to the nearby Dakota Indians. She studied music at Oberlin College for three years. During the early part of the twentieth century, she worked as a music teacher with Native Americans nationwide, while learning and transcribing their music, documenting its use in their culture, she helped preserve their culture in a time when government policy was to encourage Native Americans to adopt Western customs. Densmore began recording music for the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology in 1907. In her fifty-plus years of studying and preserving American Indian music, she collected thousands of recordings. Many of the recordings she made on behalf of the BAE now are held in the Library of Congress.

While her original recordings were on wax cylinders, many of them have been reproduced using other media and are included in other archives. The recordings may be accessed by researchers as well as tribal delegations; some of the tribes she worked with include the Chippewa, the Mandan, the Sioux, the northern Pawnee of Oklahoma, the Papago of Arizona, Indians of Washington and British Columbia and Menominee of Wisconsin, Pueblo Indians of the southwest, the Seminoles of Florida, the Kuna Indians of Panama. Densmore was published in the journal American Anthropologist, contributing throughout her career, she wrote The Indians and Their Music in 1926. Between 1910 and 1957, she published fourteen book-length bulletins for the Smithsonian, each describing the musical practices and repertories of a different Native-American group; these were reprinted as a series by DaCapo Press in 1972. She was a part of "A Ventriloquy of Anthros" in the American Indian Quarterly along with James Owen Dorsey and Eugene Buechel.

Smithsonian-Densmore Cylinder Collection Includes: Songs of the Chippewa Songs of the Sioux Songs of the Yuma and Yaqui Songs of the Pawnee and Northern Ute Songs of the Papago Songs of the Nootka and Quileute Songs of the Menominee and Hidatsa Women in musicology Frances Densmore in MNopedia, the Minnesota Encyclopedia Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 80: Mandan and Hidatsa Music, Frances Densmore Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 161: Seminole Music, Frances Densmore Finding Aids to Collections in the Smithsonian Archive of Folk Culture, includes a finding aide for a Densmore collection of wax cylinders. Frances Densmore page from Minnesota Public Radio Frances Densmore Minnesota Historical Society "The Study of Indian Music" by Frances Densmore, in the Smithsonian Annual Report for 1941. Hofmann and Densmore, Frances. Frances Densmore and American Indian music. Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, 1968. Doi: 10.5479/sil.451250.39088016102741

Arno Botha

Arnoldus Francois Botha is a South African rugby union footballer for Irish Pro14 side Munster. He can operate either as a flanker or number 8. Botha began primary school at Laerskool Messina before moving to Nylstroom, he was captain of the rugby first team of Hoërskool Nylstroom for 2 years and he represented Limpopo at the Craven Week competitions in 2008 and 2009. He represented the Bulls in the Blue Bulls in the Currie Cup and Vodacom Cup. In 2013, he signed a contract extension to keep him at the Blue Bulls until 2016, he was captain of the South Africa Under 20 team that competed in the 2011 IRB Junior World Championship in Italy and was named South Africa Under 20 player of the year. Botha made his debut for the Springboks against Italy on 8 June 2013 at Kings Park Stadium in Durban as the No. 7 flank. In his second test against Scotland on 15 June 2013 in Nelspruit, Botha left the field after four minutes of play, having ruptured ligaments in his left knee. In 2016, Botha was included in a South Africa'A' squad that played a two-match series against a touring England Saxons team.

He didn't play in their first match in Bloemfontein, but started the second match of the series, a 26–29 defeat in George. In January 2018, he joined English Premiership side London Irish. Botha joined Irish Pro14 side Munster on a one-year contract for the 2018–19 season, he made his competitive debut on 1 September 2018, starting at number 8 in their opening 2018–19 Pro14 fixture against South African side Cheetahs in Thomond Park, a game which Munster won 38–0. Botha scored his first try for Munster in the provinces 49–13 win against Ospreys on 14 September 2018. Botha made his Champions Cup debut for Munster on 20 October 2018, coming off the bench in the provinces 36–22 win against English side Gloucester in pool 2, he signed a one-year contract extension with Munster in December 2018, a deal that will see him remain with the province until at least June 2020. Botha was shown a red card for foul play in the 81st minute of Munster's 10–3 win against English side Saracens on 7 December 2019, was subsequently banned for three weeks.

He scored a hat-trick of tries in Munster's 68–3 win against South African side Southern Kings in round 11 of the 2019–20 Pro14 on 14 February 2020. "SA Rugby Player Profile – Arno Botha". South African Rugby Union. Retrieved 17 May 2018. Munster Profile Pro14 Profile Arno Botha at European Professional Club Rugby

Premier Arts and Science Charter School

Premier Arts and Science Charter School is a small, public charter school. The school is located in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, it is one of five public charter schools operating in Dauphin County in 2014. In 2015, the school's enrollment was 186 pupils in grades kindergarten through 5th, with 67.7% of pupils receiving a federal free or reduced-price meals due to family poverty. Additionally, 10% of the pupils receive special education services, while 4% are identified as gifted. According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 91% of the teachers were rated qualified under No Child Left Behind; the school provides full-day kindergarten. Premier Arts and Science Charter School is a federally designated Title I school. In 2014, enrollment at Premier Arts and Science Charter School was 138 pupils in grades kindergarten through 4th, with 79.7% of pupils eligible for a federal free or reduced-price lunch due to the family meeting the federal poverty level. The school employed 13 teachers.

Additionally, 0% of the pupils receive special education services and no pupils were identified as gifted. The school provides full-day kindergarten. According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 50% of the school's teachers were rated "Non‐Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act; the students are required to wear a uniform. In Pennsylvania, charter schools are approved and subsequently overseen by the local school board, they make in annual reports to the Pennsylvania Department of Education. In Pennsylvania, charter schools are a public school alternative to the traditional, local public schools. Students may seek admission to a local charter school; the Commonwealth bases the funding for charter schools on the principle that the state’s subsidies should follow the students, regardless of whether they choose to attend traditional public schools or charter schools. The Charter School Law requires that charter schools bill each sending school district on a monthly basis for students attending the charter school.

The Harrisburg School District tuition rate was $9,538 in 2014. In 2013, the tuition rate was $10,922.59. Additionally, when the local school district provides transportation to its students it must provide transportation at no costs to charter school students, when the receiving school is within 10 miles of the district's borders. Pennsylvania charter schools have the same academic accountability as traditional public schools and must give the PSSAs and Keystone Exams to their pupils each year, working to achieve Adequate Yearly Progress status; the goal is for 100% of the pupils to be reading on grade level and demonstrate on grade level math skills. According to Pennsylvania Charter School law, if more students apply to attend than there are open slots available, Charter Schools are required to use a random lottery system to select new incoming students. According to the Charter School law and children of individuals who help establish a charter school, are granted an “admissions preference".

Students residing in the Harrisburg School District are selected first, according to the number of slots available for Harrisburg students. If there is space available for more students, seats will be declared open for out-of-District students; the Capital Area Intermediate Unit IU15 provides the school with a wide variety of services like specialized education for disabled students and hearing and visual disability services and professional development for staff and faculty. 2015 School Performance Profile According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 23% of fourth graders were on grade level in reading, while 5% showed on grade level math skills. In science, 43% of fourth graders showed on grade level understanding. Among third graders, 32% were on grade level in reading and 20% were on grade level in mathematics. In comparison, of pupils who remained in the Harrisburg School District, 15% of fourth graders were on grade level in reading, while 6% showed on grade level math skills.

In science, 27% of fourth graders showed on grade level understanding. Among third graders, 14% were on grade level in reading and 12% were on grade level in mathematics. Statewide, Pennsylvania 4th graders were 58.6% on grade level in reading and 44.4% demonstrated on grade level math skills. In science, 77.3% of fourth graders showed on grade level understanding. Among Pennsylvania third graders, 62% were reading on grade level, while 48.5% demonstrated on grade level math skills. 2014 School Performance Profile Premier Arts and Science Charter School achieved 63.1 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading and mathematics. In reading/literature - 60% of third graders were on grade level. In mathematics, 70 % showed with 10 % showing advanced skills; the school's achievement far exceeded the reading and math achievement at Harrisburg School District schools. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2,134 of 2,947 Pennsylvania public schools, achieved an academic score of 70 or higher.

Fifty-three percent of schools statewide received lower SPP scores compared with last year's, while 46 percent improved. A handful were unchanged. PSSA History In Pennsylvania, in the spring of each school year, the public school 3rd graders take the PSSAs in math and reading; the fourth grade is tested in reading and science. The fifth grade is evaluated in reading and writing. Pennsylvania System of School Assessments called PSSAs are No Child Left Behind Act related examinations which were administered beginning 2003 to all Pennsylvania public school students in grades 3rd-8th; the goal was for 100% of students to be on grade level or better in readi

Certificate Transparency

Certificate Transparency is an Internet security standard and open source framework for monitoring and auditing digital certificates. The standard creates a system of public logs that seek to record all certificates issued by publicly trusted certificate authorities, allowing efficient identification of mistakenly or maliciously issued certificates. In 2011, a reseller of the certificate authority Comodo was attacked and the certificate authority DigiNotar was compromised, calling attention to existing flaws in the certificate authority ecosystem and accelerating work on various mechanisms to prevent or monitor unauthorized certificate issuance. Ben Laurie, Adam Langley and Emilia Kasper began work on an open source framework to combat these issues the same year, they submitted the first draft of the standard as a IETF Internet Draft in 2012 under the code-name "Sunlight". One of the problems with digital certificate management is that fraudulent certificates take a long time to be spotted and revoked by the browser vendors.

Certificate Transparency would help by making it impossible for a certificate to be issued for a domain without the domain owner knowing. Certificate Transparency does not require side channel communication to validate certificates as do some competing technologies such as Online Certificate Status Protocol and Convergence. Certificate Transparency operates without the need to trust a third party. Certificate Transparency depends on verifiable Certificate Transparency logs. A log appends new certificates to an ever-growing Merkle hash tree. To be seen as behaving a log must: Verify that each submitted certificate or precertificate has a valid signature chain leading back to a trusted root certificate authority certificate. Refuse to publish certificates without this valid signature chain. Store the entire verification chain from the newly accepted certificate back to the root certificate. Present this chain for auditing upon request. A log may accept certificates that are not yet valid and certificates that have expired.

Monitors act as clients to the log servers. Monitors check logs to make sure. An inconsistency is used to prove that a log has not behaved and the signatures on the log's data structure prevent the log from denying that misbehavior. Auditors act as clients to the log servers. Certificate Transparency auditors use partial information about a log to verify the log against other partial information they have. Google launched its first certificate transparency log in March 2013. In September 2013, DigiCert became the first certificate authority to implement Certificate Transparency. Google Chrome began requiring Certificate Transparency for newly issued Extended Validation Certificates in 2015, it began requiring Certificate Transparency for all certificates newly issued by Symantec from June 1, 2016, after they were found to have issued 187 certificates without the domain owners' knowledge. Since April 2018, this requirement has been extended to all certificates. Cloudflare announced its own CT named Nimbus on March 23, 2018.

Official website RFC 6962 - Internet Engineering Task Force crt.sh, a Certificate Transparency Log search engine Thawte CryptoReport, Search Certificate Transparency logs Symantec CryptoReport, Search Certificate Transparency logs Google Certificate Transparency Report Certificate Transparency Monitoring by Facebook

Grubb Glacier

Grubb Glacier is a glacier flowing into Lester Cove, Andvord Bay, to the west of Bagshawe Glacier, on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. The glacier appears on an Argentine government chart of 1952, it was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1960 for Thomas Grubb, an Irish optician who designed and introduced the first aplanatic camera lens, in 1857. This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Grubb Glacier"

New Market, Indiana

New Market is a town in Montgomery County, Indiana, in the United States. The population was 636 at the 2010 census; the town of New Market was platted in 1872 by Joseph White Sr. Carson Wray Sr. Joseph Kelsey and William K. White, during the construction of the S. C. L&W. railway through the area. The construction of the line was to serve the cities of Frankfort and Terre Haute. In southern Montgomery County it passed through the communities of New Market, Waveland and Crawfordsville and Lake Holiday; the line was sold to the Pennsylvania Railroad and abandoned in the 1970s. The post office at New Market has been in operation since 1872. In 1893, during the run-up to prohibition, citizens of New Market burned a saloon owned by Jake Feel. //reference Chicago Daily Tribune December 22, 1984, page 1, column 6 - "Burn a Saloon and Boast of It"// New Market is located at 39°57′7″N 86°55′15″W. According to the 2010 census, New Market has a total area of all land; as of the census of 2010, there were 636 people, 238 households, 179 families living in the town.

The population density was 2,271.4 inhabitants per square mile. There were 257 housing units at an average density of 917.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 99.1% White, 0.2% Asian, 0.6% from other races, 0.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.9% of the population. There were 238 households of which 39.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.7% had a male householder with no wife present, 24.8% were non-families. 21.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.08. The median age in the town was 36.5 years. 29.1% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the town was 48.7% male and 51.3% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 659 people, 241 households, 187 families living in the town.

The population density was 2,059.2 people per square mile. There were 248 housing units at an average density of 774.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 100.00% White. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.15% of the population. There were 241 households out of which 41.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.8% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 22.4% were non-families. 19.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.9% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.13. In the town, the population was spread out with 30.0% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 31.3% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, 10.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.7 males. The median income for a household in the town was $45,385, the median income for a family was $48,864.

Males had a median income of $38,036 versus $21,563 for females. The per capita income for the town was $17,937. None of the families and 0.5% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and none of those over 64. South Montgomery Community School Corporation operates public schools serving New Market. New Market Elementary School is in the area. Southmont Junior High School and Southmont High School serve secondary students. New Market Community Volunteer Fire Department & S&W Rescue This climatic region has large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot summers and cold winters; the Köppen Climate Classification subtype for this climate is "Dfa". South Montgomery Schools Website