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Gasconade County, Missouri

Gasconade County is a county located in the east-central portion of the U. S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,222; the county seat is Hermann. The county was named after the Gasconade River; the county is located on the south side of the Missouri River, which once served as the chief route of transportation in the state. It is located in the area known as the Missouri Rhineland; because of its distinctive conditions, the Hermann area was designated an American Viticultural Area in 1983. The southern part of the county is within the larger Ozark Highlands AVA, established in 1987. Gasconade County received its name from French-speaking settlers, they came from the Gascony region in southwestern France during French colonial rule of New France. Per a 1916 Missouri Historical Review article, "The name is from'Gascon', an inhabitant of Gascony,' a unique, marginal maritime province in the southwest of France with Basque cultural roots. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 524 square miles, of which 518 square miles is land and 6.6 square miles is water.

U. S. Route 50 Route 19 Route 28 Route 100 As of the census of 2000, there were 15,342 people, 6,171 households, 4,288 families residing in the county; the population density was 30 people per square mile. There were 7,813 housing units at an average density of 15 per square mile; the racial makeup of the county was 98.69% White, 0.12% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.14% from other races, 0.70% from two or more races. 0.42% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 6,171 households out of which 31.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.00% were married couples living together, 7.60% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.50% were non-families. 27.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.60% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.95. In the county, the population was spread out with 24.80% under the age of 18, 6.90% from 18 to 24, 25.90% from 25 to 44, 23.70% from 45 to 64, 18.80% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 94.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.90 males. The median income for a household in the county was $35,047, the median income for a family was $41,518. Males had a median income of $29,659 versus $20,728 for females; the per capita income for the county was $17,319. About 7.00% of families and 9.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.20% of those under age 18 and 10.00% of those age 65 or over. The Republican Party controls politics at the local level in Gasconade County. Republicans hold all of the elected positions in the county. Gasconade County is divided into two legislative districts in the Missouri House of Representatives. District 61 — Justin Alferman. Consists of the communities of Gasconade, Morrison, Mt. Sterling. District 62 – Tom Hurst. Consists of the communities of Bland and Rosebud. Gasconade County is a part of Missouri's 6th District in the Missouri Senate and is represented by Mike Kehoe.

Gasconade County is included in Missouri's 3rd Congressional District and is represented by Blaine Luetkemeyer in the U. S. House of Representatives. At the presidential level, Gasconade County is one of the most reliably Republican strongholds in the state of Missouri; the Republican presidential nominee has won Gasconade County in every presidential election since 1860, giving the county the longest active Republican voting streak for presidential elections in the United States. Like most rural areas throughout Northeast Missouri, voters in Gasconade County adhere to and culturally conservative principles which tend to influence their Republican leanings. In 2004, Missourians voted on a constitutional amendment to define marriage as the union between a man and a woman—it overwhelmingly passed Gasconade County with 76.48 percent of the vote. The initiative passed the state with 71 percent of support from voters as Missouri became the first state to ban same-sex marriage. In 2006, Missourians voted on a constitutional amendment to fund and legalize embryonic stem cell research in the state—it failed in Gasconade County with 58.61 percent voting against the measure.

The initiative narrowly passed the state with 51 percent of support from voters as Missouri became one of the first states in the nation to approve embryonic stem cell research. Despite Gasconade County's longstanding tradition of supporting conservative platforms, voters in the county have a penchant for advancing populist causes like increasing the minimum wage. In 2006, Missourians voted on a proposition to increase the minimum wage in the state to $6.50 an hour—it passed Gasconade County with 74.74 percent of the vote. The proposition passed every single county in Missouri with 78.99 percent voting in favor. Former U. S. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton received more votes, a total of 848, than any candidate from either party in Gasconade County during the 2008 Missouri Presidential Preference Primary. Gasconade County R-I School District - Hermann Hermann Elementary School Hermann Middle School Hermann High School Gasconade County R-II School District - Owensville Gerald Elementary School - Gerald Owensville Elementary School (K

Alvin Batiste

Alvin Batiste was an Avant-garde jazz clarinetist born in New Orleans, Louisiana. He taught at his own jazz institute at Southern University in Baton Rouge, his final album was a tribute produced by Branford Marsalis and features Russell Malone and Herlin Riley. Several well-known musicians studied under Batiste while at Southern University, they include Branford Marsalis, Randy Jackson, his brother Herman, Donald Harrison, Henry Butler, Charlie Singleton, Ronald Myers and Woodie Douglas. 1984: Musique D'Afrique Nouvell Orleans 1988: Bayou Magic 1993: Late 1999: Songs and Messages, Connections 2007: Marsalis Music Honors Series: Alvin Batiste With Cannonball Adderley The Black Messiah With Billy Cobham Magic With Henry Butler The Village With Clarinet Summit Clarinet Summit With Marlon Jordan Marlon's Mode With Mark Whitfield Patrice With Wynton Marsalis Crescent City Christmas Card Jazz News obituary

Keiko Fukuda

Keiko Fukuda was a Japanese American martial artist. She was the highest-ranked female judoka in history, holding the rank of 9th dan from the Kodokan, 10th dan from USA Judo and from the United States Judo Federation, was the last surviving student of Kanō Jigorō, founder of judo, she was a renowned pioneer of women's judo, together with her senpai Masako Noritomi being the first woman promoted to 6th dan. In 2006 the Kodokan promoted Fukuda to 9th dan, she is the first and, so far, only woman to have been promoted to 10th dan in the art of judo. After completing her formal education in Japan, Fukuda visited the United States of America to teach in the 1950s and 1960s, settled there, she continued to teach her art in the San Francisco Bay Area until her death in 2013. Fukuda was born on April 1913, in Tokyo, her father died when she was young. As a youth, she learned the arts of calligraphy, flower arrangement, the tea ceremony. Despite her conventional upbringing, Fukuda felt close to judo through memories of her grandfather, one day went with her mother to watch a judo training session.

A few months she decided to begin training for herself. Her mother and brother supported this decision, her mother and brother had thought that Fukuda would marry one of the judo practitioners, but she never married, instead becoming a judo expert herself. Fukuda's grandfather, Fukuda Hachinosuke, had been a samurai and master of Tenjin Shinyō-ryū jujutsu, he had taught that art to Kanō Jigorō, founder of judo and head of the Kodokan. Kanō had studied under three jujutsu masters before founding judo, Fukuda's grandfather had been the first of these men. Kanō had taught female students as early as 1893, had formally opened the joshi-bu of the Kodokan in 1926, he invited the young Fukuda to study judo—an unusual gesture for that time—as a mark of respect for her grandfather. She began training in judo as one of only 24 women training at the Kodokan. Apart from instruction by judo's founder, Fukuda learned from Kyuzo Mifune. Fukuda, standing at only 4' 11" and weighing less than 100 lb. became a judo instructor in 1937.

She earned a degree in Japanese literature from Showa Women's University. In 1953, she was promoted to the rank of 5th dan in judo, she traveled to the United States of America that year, at the invitation of a judo club in Oakland and stayed for two years before returning to Japan. Fukuda next traveled to the US in 1966. At that time, she was one of only four women in the world ranked at 5th dan in judo, was one of only two female instructors at the Kodokan. In 1966, she demonstrated her art at Mills College, the institution offered her a teaching position. During this time, Fukuda lived at the Noe Valley home of one of her students, Shelley Fernandez, taught judo there in addition to her teaching at the college; when the class sizes grew, she shifted the classes to the Sokoji Zen Buddhist temple in the Japantown, San Francisco. She named her school the Soko Joshi Judo Club. Having settled in the San Francisco Bay Area, Fukuda gave up her Japanese citizenship to become a US citizen. In November 1972, following a letter campaign against the rule prohibiting women from being promoted higher than 5th dan, Fukuda became the first woman promoted to 6th dan by the Kodokan.

According to Fukuda, "the Kodokan was old fashioned and sexist about belts and ranks". In 1973, she published Born for the Mat: A Kodokan kata textbook for women, an instructional book for women about the kata of Kodokan judo. In 1974, she established the annual Joshi Judo Camp to give female judo practitioners the opportunity to train together; that year, she was one of only three women in the world ranked 6th dan in judo. In 1990, Fukuda was awarded Japan's Order of the Sacred Treasure, 4th Class, the United States Judo Incorporated Henry Stone Lifetime Contribution to American Judo Award. In 2004, she published Ju-No-Kata: A Kodokan textbook and expanded from Born for the Mat, a pictorial guide for performing Ju-no-kata, one of the seven Kodokan kata. Fukuda served as a technical adviser for US Women's Judo and the USJI Kata Judges' Certification Sub-committee, she served as a National Kata Judge, was a faculty member of the USJI National Teachers’ Institute, a member of the USJF Promotion Committee, a member of the USJF and USJI Women’s Sub-committee.

Fukuda held the rank of 9th dan, the second-highest in judo, from two organizations, in July 2011 received the rank of 10th dan from a third organization. In 1994, she was the first woman to be awarded a rare red belt in judo by the Kodokan. In 2001 the USJF promoted her to USJF 9th dan for her lifelong contribution to the art of judo. On January 8, 2006, at its annual New Year's Kagami Biraki celebration, the Kodokan promoted Fukuda to the rank of 9th dan—the first time it had awarded this rank to a woman. On July 28, 2011, the promotion board of USA Judo awarded Fukuda the rank of 10th dan, an action, followed by the USJF's promotion board on September 10, 2011. Fukuda continued to teach judo three times each week, host the annual Fukuda Invitational Kata Championships, teach at the annual Joshi Judo Camp until her death, at the

Sandy Hollow-Escondidas, Texas

Sandy Hollow-Escondidas is a census-designated place in Nueces County, United States. The population was 296 at the 2010 census, down from 433 at the 2000 census. Sandy Hollow-Escondidas is located at 27°56′50″N 97°49′14″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.2 square miles, of which, 8.0 square miles of it is land and 0.2 square miles of it is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 433 people, 150 households, 111 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 54.2 people per square mile. There were 203 housing units at an average density of 25.4/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 80.60% White, 0.23% African American, 0.23% Native American, 13.39% from other races, 5.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 54.27% of the population. There were 150 households out of which 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.7% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 26.0% were non-families.

20.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.0% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.41. In the CDP, the population was spread out with 29.6% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 104.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.7 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $40,469, the median income for a family was $40,938. Males had a median income of $28,125 versus $19,821 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $14,458. About 14.5% of families and 16.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.7% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over

William de la Corner

William de la Corner was a medieval Bishop of Salisbury, who fought a long but unsuccessful battle to become Archbishop of Dublin. Corner was a papal proctor as well as a royal envoy, he successively held the offices of prebendary of Teinton Regis and Highworth in the diocese of Salisbury, precentor of the diocese of York, archdeacon of Northumberland. In 1271, on the death of Fulk Basset, Corner was nominated as Archbishop of Dublin, but faced a rival candidate in Fromund Le Brun, the Lord Chancellor of Ireland: the result was a long and bitter struggle for the office, which required the personal intervention of the Pope, ended in 1279 with both candidates being disqualified in favour of John de Derlington. Corner was an unsuccessful candidate for the bishopric of Salisbury in March 1288, losing out to Lawrence de Awkeburne. After Lawrence's death, William was elected on 24 November 1288 and consecrated on 8 May 1289. Corner died in October 1291 on the 10th. British History Online Bishops of Salisbury accessed on 30 October 2007 Fryde, E. B..

Handbook of British Chronology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X

Thousand Hope Candidates

The Thousand Hope Candidates was an electoral alliance between four left-wing political parties in Turkey, formed in preparation for the 2007 general election. The alliance contested the election by fielding candidates from participating parties as independents in order to bypass the 10% election threshold needed to win seats in the Turkish Grand National Assembly; the alliance's candidates won a total of 22 seats in the election. Lacking a realistic prospect of gaining parliamentary representation due to the 10% threshold, the pro-Kurdish Democratic Society Party, the socialist libertarian Freedom and Solidarity Party, the Labour Party and the Socialist Democracy Party joined forces and decided to field candidates under a joint alliance, hence creating the Thousand Hope alliance; the alliance stated that its candidates included individuals who could extend the appeal of the political left to the general public, having extended support to other left-wing candidates who were not part of the four member parties.

The alliance fielded 65 candidates in 40 provinces. The Labour Party and the Freedom and Solidarity Party fielded their own candidates in the remaining 41 provinces but fell well short of the 10% electoral threshold; the alliance was in favour of minority rights, having campaigned as'Kurds wanting peace'. Segments of society such as the LGBT community, which the alliance claimed had faced discrimination and oppression, played a major role in alliance's election campaign. Critics branded the alliance as Kurdish nationalist, pointing to the pro-Kurdish DTP, the biggest of the four participating parties. A similar alliance, namely the Labour and Freedom Bloc, was formed in preparation for the 2011 general election four years later; this table only shows. In the remaining 41 provinces, the Freedom and Solidarity Party and the Labour Party fielded their own candidates; the votes that they won in these other provinces that were not part of the Thousand Hope candidate alliance are not shown. Swing and seat change is compared to the Democratic People's Party's performance in the 2002 general election Provinces won by Thousand Hope candidates are coloured purple in the map 22 of a total of 65 candidates were elected.

The combined votes won by Thousand Hope candidates were higher than any other party in the provinces of Tunceli, Diyarbakır, Muş, Iğdır, Hakkari and Şırnak. The results represented a significant swing to the governing Justice and Development Party, which made heavy gains in the Kurdish south-east were the Democratic People's Party had won back in 2002. Only 2 of the 22 Thousand Hope Candidates elected were from non-southeastern provinces, namely Ufuk Uras and Sebahat Tuncel from İstanbul's 1st and 3rd electoral district respectively; the following table shows the distribution of DTP, SDP, EMEP and ÖDP members within the 22 elected members. The full list of members elected under the Thousand Hope banner are as follows: The Labour Party and the Freedom and Solidarity Party both fielded candidates as a party in electoral districts where the Thousand Hope Candidates did not run for election; the votes shares won by these parties are as follows. 23rd Parliament of Turkey Electoral system of Turkey Peoples' Democratic Congress Peace and Democracy Party Kurdish nationalism Labour and Freedom Bloc ÖDP official website SDP official website EMEP official website The DTP, having been dissolved in 2009 and replaced by the Peace and Democracy Party, no longer has an active website