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God the Father

God the Father is a title given to God in various religions, most prominently in Christianity. In mainstream trinitarian Christianity, God the Father is regarded as the first person of the Trinity, followed by the second person, God the Son, the third person, God the Holy Spirit. Since the second century, Christian creeds included affirmation of belief in "God the Father" as his capacity as "Father and creator of the universe". However, in Christianity the concept of God as the father of Jesus Christ goes metaphysically further than the concept of God as the Creator and father of all people, as indicated in the Apostle's Creed where the expression of belief in the "Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth" is but separately followed by in "Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord", thus expressing both senses of fatherhood. In much of modern Christianity, God is addressed as the Father, in part because of his active interest in human affairs, in the way that a father would take an interest in his children who are dependent on him and as a father, he will respond to humanity, his children, acting in their best interests.

Many believe they can communicate with God and come closer to him through prayer – a key element of achieving communion with God. In general, the title Father signifies God's role as the life-giver, the authority, powerful protector viewed as immense, omniscient, omnipresent with infinite power and charity that goes beyond human understanding. For instance, after completing his monumental work Summa Theologica, Catholic St. Thomas Aquinas concluded that he had not yet begun to understand'God the Father'. Although the term "Father" implies masculine characteristics, God is defined as having the form of a spirit without any human biological gender, e.g. the Catechism of the Catholic Church No. 239 states that "God is neither man nor woman: he is God". Although God is never directly addressed as "Mother", at times motherly attributes may be interpreted in Old Testament references such as Isa 42:14, Isa 49:14–15 or Isa 66:12–13. In the New Testament, the Christian concept of God the Father may be seen as a continuation of the Jewish concept, but with specific additions and changes, which over time made the Christian concept become more distinct by the start of the Middle Ages.

The conformity to the Old Testament concepts is shown in Matthew 4:10 and Luke 4:8 where in response to temptation Jesus quotes Deuteronomy 6:13 and states: "It is written, you shall worship the Lord your God, him only shall you serve." 1 Corinthians 8:6 shows the distinct Christian teaching about the agency of Christ by first stating: "there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, we unto him" and continuing with "and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things, we through him." This passage acknowledges the Jewish teachings on the uniqueness of God, yet states the role of Jesus as an agent in creation. Over time, the Christian doctrine began to diverge from Judaism through the teachings of the Church Fathers in the second century and by the fourth century belief in the Trinity was formalized. According to Mary Rose D'Angelo and James Barr, the Aramaic term Abba was in the early times of the New Testament neither markedly a term of endearment, nor a formal word. According to Marianne Thompson, in the Old Testament, God is called "Father" with a unique sense of familiarity.

In addition to the sense in which God is "Father" to all men because he created the world, the same God is uniquely the law-giver to his chosen people. He maintains a special, covenantal father-child relationship with the people, giving them the Shabbat, stewardship of his prophecies, a unique heritage in the things of God, calling Israel "my son" because he delivered the descendants of Jacob out of slavery in Egypt according to his covenants and oaths to their fathers, Abraham and Jacob. In the Hebrew Bible, in Isaiah 63:16 it reads: "For You are our father, for Abraham did not know us, neither did Israel recognize us. To God, according to Judaism, is attributed the fatherly role of protector, he is titled the Father of the orphan and the widow, their guarantor of justice. He is titled the Father of the king, as the teacher and helper over the judge of Israel. According to Alon Goshen-Gottstein, in the Old Testament "Father" is a metaphor. In Christianity fatherhood is taken in a more literal and substantive sense, is explicit about the need for the Son as a means of accessing the Father, making for a more metaphysical rather than metaphorical interpretation.

There is a deep sense in which Christians believe that they are made participants in the eternal relationship of Father and Son, through Jesus Christ. Christians call themselves adopted children of God: But when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons, and because you are sons, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, "Abba! Father!” So you are no longer a slave, but a son, if a son an heir through God. In Christianity the concept of God as the Father of Jesus is distinct from the concept of God as the Creator and Father of all people, as indicated in the Apostle's Creed; the profession in the creed begins with expressing belief in the "Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth" and the

Jeremy Isaacs

Sir Jeremy Israel Isaacs is a Scottish television producer and executive, winner of many BAFTA awards and international Emmy Awards. He was General Director of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. Isaacs was born in Glasgow from what were described as "Scottish Jewish roots", he grew up in Hillhead, the son of a jeweller and a GP, is a cousin to virologist Alick Isaacs. He was educated at the independent Glasgow Academy and Merton College, where he read Classics, he did his National Service in the Highland Light Infantry. Isaacs began his career in television when he joined Granada Television in Manchester as a producer in 1958. At Granada he was involved in creating or supervising series such as World in Action and What the Papers Say, he has worked for the BBC in the 1960s and was the overall producer for the 26-episode series The World at War for Thames Television. He was Director of Programmes for Thames between 1974 and 1978, he produced Ireland: A Television History for the BBC and co-produced the twenty-four episode television documentary series Cold War and the ten-part series Millennium.

Isaacs was the founding chief executive of Channel 4 between 1981 and 1987, overseeing its launch period and setting the channel's original cultural approach with opera and foreign language film, although such programmes as the pop music series The Tube and soap opera Brookside had a place in the schedule from the beginning. The channel commissioned Michael Elliott's production of King Lear with Laurence Olivier in the title role and Isaacs recommissioned a number of programmes from his time at Granada including What the Papers Say, his appointment of David Rose long with the BBC, as the Commissioning Editor for Fiction led to the Channel's involvement with the eighties revival of the British film industry via the Film on Four strand. Despite a general liberal atmosphere though, a few commissioned programmes, such as Ken Loach's A Question of Leadership, were withdrawn from transmission. In 1990, Isaacs named a four-hour dramatisation of an early Percy Bysshe Shelley Gothic horror novel, Zastrozzi, as one of the 10 programmes of which he was most proud during his tenure as Channel 4's chief executive.

When handing over responsibility for running the channel to Michael Grade, Isaacs threatened to throttle him if he betrayed the trust placed in him to respect the channel's remit. After leaving Channel 4, failing to be appointed Director General of the BBC in 1987, Isaacs became General Director of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, a role he fulfilled until 1996; this was a difficult period for the ROH, not helped by the broadcast of the revealing The House documentary series on BBC2. From 1990 to 1998, Isaacs was the interviewer in a revival of the BBC series Face to Face. Ted Turner sought out Isaacs for the role of executive producer for the 24-episode Cold War series. Between 1997 and 2000, Isaacs was president of the Royal Television Society, he was chairman of Artsworld before it was sold to Sky. Never Mind the Moon, Bantam Press, 1999 ISBN 0-593-04355-3 Look Me in the Eye: A Life in Television, Brown, 2006 ISBN 0-316-72728-8 Cold War, Bantam Press, 1998 ISBN 0-593-04309-X Jeremy Isaacs on IMDb Cold War: About the Series at CNN.com Raymond Snoddy, "Sir Jeremy Isaacs: History man - a life in pictures", The Independent 27 February 2006 Retrieved 3 March 2008 Sabine Durrant, "It hurts, it hurts, it hurts", The Guardian, 5 November 1999 Retrieved 3 March 2008

North-Western Province, Zambia

North-Western Province is one of ten Provinces of Zambia. It covers an area of 125,826 km2, has a population of 727,044 and a population density was 5.80 per square kilometre as of 2010. It is the most sparsely populated province in the country; the provincial capital is Solwezi. The literacy rate stood at 63 per cent against a national average of 70.2 per cent. The rural population constituted 77.45%, while the urban population was 22.55%. North-Western Province is bordered along Angola in the west, the Democratic Republic of Congo in the north, Copperbelt Province in the southeast, Central in the south, Western Province in the west. Agriculture was the major profession and Sorghum was the major crop in the province with 1,038 metric tonnes, constituting 8.98% of the national output. The unemployment rate was 14 per cent and the general unemployment rate for youth stood at 31 per cent as of 2008. Zambezi Airport and Solwezi Airport are the only two airports in the province. Busanga Swamps and plains in Kafue National Park, West Lunga National Park and Zambezi grasslands in the far west of the state are the major national parks in the Province.

The Likumbi lya Mize festival, a UNESCO world heritage ceremony celebrated in Zambezi District by Luvale tribe, popularly known as vakaChinyama during August. The chivweka ceremon is celebrated by the luchazi people of kabompo district the ceremony is held every July at senior chief kalunga's palace in chikenge the capital of the luchazi people.chivweka means making fire. Kufukwila festival celebrated in Solwezi District by Kaonde tribe during May, Insakwa yaba Kaonde festival celebrated in Solwezi District by Kaonde tribe during May and Nsomo festival celebrated in Kasempa District by Kaonde tribe during June are the major festivals of the province. North-Western Province is bordered along Angola in the west, DR Congo in the north, Copperbelt Province in the east, Central in the south-east and Western Province in the south-west; the general topography of the province is characterized by uplifted plantation surfaces. The general elevation of the nation as a whole is tended towards West to East from the Kalahari Basin.

The level of land falls from the upper Congo towards the Zambezi depression in the South forming a plateau. The province lies in the watershed between DR Zambezi river systems; the province along with some of the other provinces in the country lies in the frontier formed between the continental divide separating the Atlantic Ocean and the Indian Ocean, which traverses from DR Congo to the south of Tanzania. There are three major seasons: a cool dry season from April to August, a hot dry season from August to November and a warm wet season from November to April; the maximum heat is experienced during October, while the maximum rainfall is received during December. The annual rainfall is more than 1,200 mm in the region; the region has Savannah vegetation and small areas of dry evergreen forests. As per the 2010 Zambian census, North-Western Province had a population of 727,044 accounting to 5.55% of the total Zambian population of 13,092,666. There were 358,141 males and 368,903 females, making the sex ratio to 1,030 for every 1,000 males, compared to the national average of 1,028.

The literacy rate stood at 63.00% against a national average of 70.2%. The rural population constituted 77.45%, while the urban population was 22.55%. The total area of the province was 125,826 km2 and the population density was 5.80 per km2. The population density during 2000 Zambian census stood at 5.80. The decadal population growth of the province was 2.20%. The median age in the province at the time of marriage was 20.5. The average household size was 5.6, with the families headed by females being 4.5 and 5.9 for families headed by men. The total eligible voters in the province was 72.20%. The unemployment rate of the province was 10.30%. The total fertility rate was 6.8, complete birth rate was 6.3, crude birth rate was 38.0, child women population at birth was 870, general fertility rate was 169, gross reproduction rate was 2.7 and net reproduction rate was 1.9. The total labour force constituted 55.50% of the total population. Out of the labour force,60.9 % were 50.4 % women. The annual growth rate of labour force was 1.8%.

Lunda was the most spoken language with 33.8% speaking it. Albinism is a condition where the victims do not have any pigment in hair or eyes; the total population in the province with the condition stood at 1,387. The life expectancy at birth stood at 56 compared to the national average of 51. Busanga Swamps and plains in Kafue National Park, West Lunga National Park and Zambezi grasslands in the far west of the state are the major national parks in the Province; the Kufukwila festival celebrated in Solwezi District by Kaonde tribe during May, Insakwa yaba Kaonde festival celebrated in Solwezi District by Kaonde tribe during May, Nsomo festival celebrated in Kasempa District by Kaonde tribe during June, Ntongo festival celebrated in Mufumbwe District by Kaonde tribe during June, Ukupupa festival celebrated in Solwezi District by Lamba tribe during July, Chivweka festival celebrated in Kabompo District by Luchazi tribe during July, Kunyata Ntanda festival celebrated in Solwezi District by Kaonde tribe during July, Likumbi Lya Mize festival celebrated in Zambezi District by Luvale tribe during August, Lunda Lubanza festival celebrated in Zambezi District by Lunda tribe during August, Lubinda Ntongo festival celebrated in Solwezi District by Kaonde tribe during August, Chisemwa Cha Lunda festival celebrated in Mwinilunga District by Lunda tribe during September, Makundu festival celebrated in Mufumbwe District by Kaonde tribe during September, Mbunda Liyoyelo festival celebrated in Kabompo District by Mbunda tribe during September, Kuvuluka Kishakulu f