Grant County, North Dakota

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Grant County, North Dakota
Carson Roller Mill.jpg
Map of North Dakota highlighting Grant County
Location within the U.S. state of North Dakota
Map of the United States highlighting North Dakota
North Dakota's location within the U.S.
Founded1916
Named forUlysses S. Grant
SeatCarson
Largest cityElgin
Area
 • Total1,666 sq mi (4,315 km2)
 • Land1,659 sq mi (4,297 km2)
 • Water6.8 sq mi (18 km2), 0.4%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)2,374
 • Density1.43/sq mi (0.55/km2)
Congressional districtAt-large
Time zoneMountain: UTC−7/−6
Websitegrantcountynd.com

Grant County is a county in the U.S. state of North Dakota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 2,394,[1] its county seat is Carson.[2]

History[edit]

The territory of Grant County was part of Morton County until 1916. On November 7 the county voters determined that the SW portion of the county would be partitioned off to form a new county, to be named after Ulysses S. Grant, the US President from 1869 to 1877. Accordingly, the county government was organized on November 28, with Carson as the seat; the county's boundaries have remained unchanged since its creation.[3][4][5]

Geography[edit]

Heart Butte is a prominent geographic feature in Grant County, and the namesake for the nearby Heart Butte Dam.

The Heart River flows eastward through the upper part of Grant County, and Cedar Creek flows east-northeastward along the county's southern boundary line; the county terrain consists of isolated hills among rolling hills, carved by drainages. The semi-arid ground is partially devoted to agriculture;[6] the terrain slopes to the east and south; its highest point is a rise near its SW corner, at 2,680' (817m) ASL.[7] The county has a total area of 1,666 square miles (4,310 km2), of which 1,659 square miles (4,300 km2) is land and 6.8 square miles (18 km2) (0.4%) is water.[8] Lake Tschida, a Bureau of Reclamation reservoir and recreation area on the Heart River, is the county's largest body of water.[9]

The SW corner of North Dakota observes Mountain Time (Adams, Billings, Bowman, Golden Valley, Grant, Hettinger, Slope, and Stark counties); the counties of McKenzie, Dunn, and Sioux counties are split, with the western portions observing Mountain Time.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Protected areas[6][edit]

Lakes[6][edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19209,553
193010,1346.1%
19408,264−18.5%
19507,114−13.9%
19606,248−12.2%
19705,009−19.8%
19804,274−14.7%
19903,549−17.0%
20002,841−19.9%
20102,394−15.7%
Est. 20182,374[10]−0.8%
US Decennial Census[11]
1790-1960[12] 1900-1990[13]
1990-2000[14] 2010-2018[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 2,841 people, 1,195 households, and 800 families in the county; the population density was 2 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 1,722 housing units at an average density of 1.04 per square mile (0.40/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.90% White, 1.72% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.35% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. 0.60% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 73.7% were of German, 7.9% Norwegian and 5.2% American ancestry.

There were 1,195 households out of which 25.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.80% were married couples living together, 3.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.00% were non-families. 31.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.90.

The county population contained 23.40% under the age of 18, 4.30% from 18 to 24, 20.50% from 25 to 44, 27.10% from 45 to 64, and 24.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females there were 104.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $23,165, and the median income for a family was $30,625. Males had a median income of $21,537 versus $17,949 for females; the per capita income for the county was $14,616. About 14.70% of families and 20.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.70% of those under age 18 and 20.90% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,394 people, 1,128 households, and 694 families in the county;[15] the population density was 1.4 inhabitants per square mile (0.54/km2). There were 1,690 housing units at an average density of 1.02 per square mile (0.39/km2).[16] The racial makeup of the county was 97.2% white, 1.1% American Indian, 0.1% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.3% of the population.[15] In terms of ancestry, 66.6% were German, 14.0% were Norwegian, 12.5% were Russian, 5.9% were Irish, 5.5% were English, and 2.2% were American.[17]

Of the 1,128 households, 19.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 3.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 38.5% were non-families, and 36.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 2.72. The median age was 51.7 years.[15]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,500 and the median income for a family was $53,542. Males had a median income of $33,750 versus $27,303 for females; the per capita income for the county was $25,840. About 7.3% of families and 13.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.1% of those under age 18 and 18.7% of those age 65 or over.[18]

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Defunct township[edit]

  • Otter Creek Township[19]

Politics[edit]

Grant County voters have traditionally voted Republican. In no national election since 1936 has the county selected the Democratic Party candidate.

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 80.2% 1,108 13.4% 185 6.4% 88
2012 72.5% 1,025 23.6% 334 3.8% 54
2008 64.9% 873 30.1% 405 5.0% 67
2004 76.7% 952 21.3% 264 2.1% 26
2000 75.5% 1,077 16.5% 235 8.1% 115
1996 55.5% 760 21.9% 300 22.6% 309
1992 45.9% 900 21.2% 415 32.9% 644
1988 66.1% 1,351 32.0% 654 1.9% 38
1984 74.9% 1,607 23.6% 507 1.5% 31
1980 80.9% 1,891 13.6% 317 5.6% 131
1976 53.4% 1,205 42.2% 952 4.5% 101
1972 70.2% 1,569 26.7% 596 3.2% 71
1968 71.8% 1,648 21.3% 488 7.0% 160
1964 57.1% 1,421 42.7% 1,063 0.2% 4
1960 65.2% 1,794 34.7% 955 0.1% 2
1956 72.0% 1,872 27.6% 718 0.4% 9
1952 85.3% 2,465 14.0% 403 0.7% 21
1948 66.9% 1,555 29.7% 689 3.4% 79
1944 80.6% 1,745 19.0% 410 0.4% 9
1940 81.5% 2,815 18.2% 627 0.3% 11
1936 29.6% 1,022 53.8% 1,858 16.7% 576
1932 18.0% 657 79.7% 2,912 2.3% 85
1928 54.6% 1,759 44.5% 1,434 0.9% 29
1924 39.1% 1,120 4.4% 125 56.6% 1,622
1920 83.2% 2,184 11.3% 296 5.6% 146

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 10, 2011. Retrieved October 31, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Long, John H. (2006). "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries; the Newberry Library. Archived from the original on November 11, 2007. Retrieved February 19, 2019.
  4. ^ Certification of the division of Morton County, ND 28 November 1916Archived July 3, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ "County History". North Dakota.gov. The State of North Dakota. Retrieved February 19, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e Grant County ND Google Maps (accessed 19 February 2019)
  7. ^ "Find an Altitude/Grant County ND" Google Maps (accessed 19 February 2019)
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 29, 2015. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  9. ^ "Heart Butte Reservoir". Recreation.gov. Bureau of Reclamation. Retrieved June 3, 2010.
  10. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  11. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  12. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  13. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  14. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  15. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2016.
  16. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau]]. Retrieved March 14, 2016.
  17. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2016.
  18. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2016.
  19. ^ "Geographic Change Notes for North Dakota". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original (TXT) on October 10, 2012. Retrieved June 17, 2010.
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 12, 2018.

Further reading[edit]

Kane, Joseph Nathan; Charles Curry Aiken (2004). The American Counties: Origins of County Names, Dates of Creation, and Population Data, 1950-2000. Scarecrow Press. p. 116. ISBN 0-8108-5036-2.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 46°22′N 101°38′W / 46.36°N 101.64°W / 46.36; -101.64