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Haywood County, North Carolina

Haywood County is a county in the western portion of the U. S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 59,036, its county seat and largest city is Waynesville. Haywood County is part of NC Metropolitan Statistical Area; the county was formed by European Americans in 1808 from the western part of Buncombe County. It was named for John Haywood, who served as the North Carolina State Treasurer from 1787 to 1827. In 1828 the western part of Haywood County became Macon County. In 1851 parts of Haywood and Macon counties were combined to form Jackson County; the last shot of the Civil War east of the Mississippi was fired in Waynesville on May 9, 1865, when elements of the Thomas Legion skirmished with the 2nd NC Mounted. A monument is situated on Sulphur Springs Road in Waynesville. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 555 square miles, of which 554 square miles is land and 0.9 square miles is water. The Pigeon River originates in Haywood County.

All rivers and springs that flow in Haywood County originate in the county. Haywood County is situated amidst the Blue Ridge Mountains and contains parts of several major subranges of the Blue Ridge, namely the Great Smoky Mountains in the west and the Plott Balsams and Great Balsam Mountains in the south. Notable peaks in the county include Cold Mountain, at 6,030 feet, Mount Sterling, at 5,835 feet, Richland Balsam, at 6,410 feet in elevation. Mt. Guyot, the county's highest point at 6,621 feet, is the 4th highest mountain east of the Mississippi River. Black Balsam Knob, in the Great Balsam Mountains in the southeastern section of the county, is the highest grassy bald in the entire Appalachian range. Haywood County is believed to be the highest county east of the Mississippi River, with a mean elevation of 3,600 feet or 1,097 metres. A portion of Great Smoky Mountains National Park lies in the northwestern section of the county, north of Maggie Valley. Along with several mountains rising to over 6,000 feet in elevation, the Haywood County area of the Smokies includes Cataloochee, home to a large campground and several historical structures dating to the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Other protected areas include substantial sections of the Pisgah National Forest in the far northeastern and southern parts of the county. Blue Ridge Parkway Great Smoky Mountains National Park Pisgah National Forest Cherokee Indian Reservation/Qualla Boundary As of the census of 2000, there were 54,033 people, 23,100 households, 16,054 families residing in the county; the population density was 98 people per square mile. There were 28,640 housing units at an average density of 52 per square mile; the racial makeup of the county was 96.85% White, 1.27% Black or African American, 0.49% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.44% from other races, 0.71% from two or more races. 1.41 % of the population were Latino of any race. 30.8% were of American, 12.9% English, 12.0% German, 10.4% Irish and 8.3% Scots-Irish ancestry according to Census 2000. 97.1 % spoke 1.9 % Spanish as their first language. There were 23,100 households out of which 26.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.70% were married couples living together, 9.50% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.50% were non-families.

26.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.30% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.76. In the county, the population was spread out with 20.80% under the age of 18, 6.20% from 18 to 24, 26.90% from 25 to 44, 27.10% from 45 to 64, 19.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 92.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.70 males. The median income for a household in the county was $33,922, the median income for a family was $40,438. Males had a median income of $30,731 versus $21,750 for females; the per capita income for the county was $18,554. About 8.10% of families and 11.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.40% of those under age 18 and 10.30% of those age 65 or over. Voter Registration Statistics In Haywood County: Democrats – 14,449 Republicans – 14,068Haywood County is a member of the regional Southwestern Commission council of governments.

Haywood County contains a portion of the Qualla Boundary, a tribal reservation for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Lands and people living within this reservation are subject to tribal/federal laws rather than county or state laws. Haywood County Schools has 16 schools ranging from pre-kindergarten to twelfth grade; those are separated into four high schools, three middle schools, nine elementary schools. The two major high schools in the Haywood County Schools System, the Tuscola High School Mountaineers of Waynesville and Pisgah High School Black Bears of Canton participate in one of the fiercest high school rivalries in the Southeast; the two high school football teams battle it out for the Haywood County Championship each fall, drawing up to 15,000 fans. The series is tied at 25-25-1; the Pisgah Bears won the last meeting. Norfolk Southern Railway operates a portion of the Murphy Branch line through Haywood County, providing a rail connection with the rest of the country. Norfolk Southern operates a small yard in Canton which directly serves Evergreen Packaging and originates several local runs.

Canton Clyde Maggie Valley Waynesville Lake Junaluska West Cant

Mesothermal

In climatology, the term mesothermal is used to refer to certain forms of climate found in the Earth's temperate zones. It has a moderate amount of heat, with winters not cold enough to sustain snow cover. Summers are warm within oceanic climate regimes, hot within continental climate regimes; the term is derived from two Greek words meaning "having a moderate amount of heat." This can be misinterpreted, since the term is intended to describe only the temperature conditions that prevail during the winter months, rather than those for the year as a whole. Under the broadest definition, all places with an average temperature in their coldest month, colder than 18 °C, but warmer than −3 °C, are said to have a mesothermal climate. In some climate classification schemes, this is divided into two segments, with a coldest-month average of 6 °C being the line of demarcation between them. Observing the narrower definition articulated above, the mesothermal locations are those where the winters are too cold to allow year-round photosynthesis, but not cold enough to support a fixed period of continuous snow cover every year.

In the US, the northern boundary line between mesothermal and microthermal ranges is north of Juneau and Sitka at the Pacific Ocean. It goes south to about 38N latitude in the Rockies eastward across the lower Midwest to the East Coast near Boston; the southern boundary line between mesothermal and megathermal is across south Florida just above Palm Beach. Summers in these places may be hot or warm; the hot-summer, or continental, mesothermal climate is encountered in the Northern Hemisphere, in the landmass interiors of Asia and North America and along their east coasts, while the most seen example of a warm to cool-summer mesothermal climate is the oceanic climates found along the west coasts of all of the world's continents equidistant between the geographical tropical and polar zones. List of mesothermal cities and their summer temperatures: Hong Kong-hot summer Milan-hot summer New York City-hot summer Tokyo-hot summer London-warm summer Mexico City-warm summer Vancouver-warm summer In addition to being subdivisible by summer temperature, mesothermal climates can be subclassified on the basis of precipitation — into humid and arid subtypes within your front door within depth Megathermal Microthermal Applied Climatology, John Griffiths

Waverly, Ohio

Waverly is a village in, the county seat of, Pike County, United States, located 14 miles south of Chillicothe. The population was 4,408 at the 2010 census; the town was formed in 1829, as the construction of the Ohio and Erie Canal along the west bank of the Scioto River brought new growth to the area. In 1861 the county seat was moved here from Piketon. Waverly is served by the Garnet A. Wilson Public Library. Historians believe that Waverly and the surrounding areas were inhabited by nomadic people as early as 13,000 BC; the first historical evidence that can be tied to a particular culture dates back to sometime between the years 1000 and 800 BC, to the culture known as the "Adena". The area around Waverly is rich in Adena heritage, including a number of mounds throughout the area; the Adena were given their cognomen from Thomas Worthington's Adena Estate near Chillicothe, where evidence of their culture was found in the early 1900s. There is evidence pointing to the emergence of the "Hopewell" culture in the Waverly area beginning about 300 BC.

The namesake for the Hopewell is Captain M. C. Hopewell, the owner of the Ross County farmstead where artifacts leading to the discovery of the Hopewell's separate cultural identity were found. Both the Adena and the Hopewell are well known for their mounds, many of which still exist around southern Ohio, including several in Pike County, just north of Waverly in Chillicothe, where the Adena Mound is a registered historic structure. There is evidence of Hopewell in the area until about 600 AD; the cause of the demise of the Hopewell is unknown, there is not much information available about the people following them. Sometime after 1000 AD, the "Fort Ancient" people began to occupy southern Ohio, only to disappear in the 17th century decimated by infectious diseases spread in epidemics from early European contact; some scholars believe that the Fort Ancient people "were ancestors of the historic Shawnee people, or that, at the least, the historic Shawnees absorbed remnants of these older peoples."There is a historical gap between evidence of the end of the Fort Ancient presence in the Waverly area and the beginning of the presence of the Shawnee Native American tribe.

It is not known whether the Shawnee were descendants of the Fort Ancient, but there are a number of similarities between the two cultures that have led some to speculate that this is the case. As European settlements began to push into Ohio country, the Shawnee were driven further and further west, there is an extensive record of the Shawnee's clashes with settlers, including Tecumseh's War and various battles of the War of 1812. One of the most well-known leaders of the Shawnee tribe, was born somewhere close to Waverly just north of the village's site, in 1768; as early as the age of 15, after the American Revolutionary War ended in 1783, Tecumseh was fighting alongside other Shawnee to stop the white invasion of their lands by attacking settlers' flatboats traveling down the Ohio River from Pennsylvania. In time, Tecumseh came to lead his own band of warriors and his bravery and leadership have caused him to become an American folk hero and his legend still lives large in Waverly and the surrounding areas.

Although Europeans had been in the area hunting and surveying for some time prior, not until 1796 did the first Europeans began to settle in the area around Waverly, in what is now Pike County, Ohio. Pike County was named for General Zebulon Montgomery Pike, killed at the storming of York in Upper Canada in the war of 1812–15, he died during the war, on April 25, 1813, aged 35, is considered a war hero, many landmarks and geographic areas being named after him. Waverly was platted in about 1829 by a M. Downing, it had 306 inhabitants by 1840, it was known as Uniontown. He is believed to have done this; the Ohio and Erie Canal, completed to Waverly in the early 1830s, transformed the landscape of southern Ohio in many ways, played a major part in the development of Waverly and its surrounding areas. The initial plan for the Canal's route was not through Waverly, it is believed that several noteworthy interested parties, including Robert Lucas and James Emmitt, had a hand in redirecting the route of the Canal to pass through or near their land, thereby benefiting them personally.

Robert Lucas plotted the Canal right through his land near Jasper, while Emmitt had many interests in Waverly on the canal route, owned the first canalboat to pass through the Canal, the Governor Worthington. After several years of political battle, the county seat of Pike County was moved from Piketon to Waverly in 1861, Waverly remains the county seat to this day. In 1859, James Emmitt led a group of supporters to petition to remove the county seat to Waverly, which met with strong resistance from those with an interest in keeping the seat in Piketon, the county seat for over 45 years. To push the removal across the line, those in favor of moving the county seat to Waverly promised to provide a new courthouse as a gift to the people of Pike County in Waverly; this courthouse still stands on Second Street in Waverly. Additionally, a number of parties including James Emmitt created a bridge across the Scioto River in Waverly, which up until that point had required chartering a ferry boat to cross – this was no doubt another incentive to move the seat to Waverly.

In the end, despite a number of reported irregularities in the special election, the Waverly supporters were victorious, on November 11, 1861, the county commissioners ordered the removal of t

Jhalmuri

Jhalmuri is a street snack originating from the Bengal region of the Indian subcontinent, made of puffed rice and an assortment of spices and chanachur or bhujia. It is popular in Bangladesh and the eastern regions of India. Jhalmuri originated in the Bengal region of the Indian subcontinent. Churumuri is a similar dish of puffed rice mixed with carrot, spices, jaggery along with coriander leaves. It's a famous evening snack of Karnataka. Mandakki and other varieties of churmuri are popular snacks among the people of North Karnataka, found at fairs, marriage parties and other social meetings. Being a healthy and affordable food, it has become a part and parcel of the lives of Karnataka residents, may be enjoyed with a cup of hot coffee or tea. Churmuri is familiar to Mysoreans. Churmuri can have a number of toppings; the combination of finely chopped onions, chopped cilantro, grated carrots and dry roasted peanuts is one of the most popular toppings for churmuri. Preparation involves mixing puffed rice and chanachur in a bowl, along with mustard oil, chili and shaking the bowl.

Sometimes it is prepared as a soup with pudina or cucumber. It is served in a thonga, a type of paper bag found in Bengal. Sometimes it is served in a bowl; this is a street side food, famous for its spicy and tangy content. List of Bangladeshi dishes List of Indian dishes List of rice dishes

List of ambassadors of the United States to Mauritania

The United States embassy in Mauritania is located in Nouakchott. Mauritania – United States relations have been developing since 1960; the incumbent ambassador is Michael Dodman Henry S. Villard – Career FSOTitle: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Resident in, concurrent US Ambassador to, neighbouring Senegal Appointed: November 28, 1960 Terminated mission: Left post, April 30, 1961 Philip M. Kaiser – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Resident in, concurrent US Ambassador to, neighbouring Senegal Appointed: August 1, 1961 Terminated mission: Left post, May 18, 1964 William L. Eagleton, Jr – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Ad Interim Appointed: 1962 Terminated mission: 1964 Geoffrey W. Lewis – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: March 31, 1965 Terminated mission: Left post, June 9, 1967 Robert A. Stein – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary.

Appointed: March 1970 Terminated mission: Left post, November 1971 Richard W. Murphy – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: December 17, 1971 Terminated mission: Left post, June 5, 1974 Holsey G. Handyside – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: April 15, 1975 Terminated mission: Left post, December 5, 1977 E. Gregory Kryza – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: December 16, 1977 Terminated mission: Left post, June 29, 1980 Stanley N. Schrager – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Ad Interim Appointed: September 1980 Terminated mission: Left post, July 1982 Edward Brynn – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Ad Interim Appointed: July 1982 Terminated mission: Left post, February 1983 Edward Lionel Peck – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: February 19, 1983 Terminated mission: Left post, July 7, 1985 Robert L. Pugh – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary.

Appointed: September 5, 1985 Terminated mission: Left post, July 5, 1988 William H. Twaddell – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: October 6, 1988 Terminated mission: Left post, July 20, 1991 Gordon S. Brown – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: September 5, 1991 Terminated mission: Left post, August 18, 1994 Dorothy Myers Sampas – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: November 3, 1994 Terminated mission: Left post, July 4, 1994 Timberlake Foster – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: November 11, 1997 Terminated mission: Left post, October 3, 2000 John W. Limbert – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: November 21, 2000 Terminated mission: Left post, August 8, 2003 Joseph LeBaron – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: September 1, 2003 Terminated mission: November 22, 2007 Mark Boulware – Career FSO Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary.

Appointed: November 22, 2007 Terminated mission: Left post, October 1, 2010 Jo Ellen Powell – Career FSOTitle: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Appointed: October 10, 2010 Terminated mission: Left post, December 12, 2013 Larry André Jr. – Career FSOTitle: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary Nominated: January 6, 2014 Appointed: September 25, 2014 Terminated mission: Left post, November 20, 2017 Mauritania – United States relations Foreign relations of Mauritania Ambassadors of the United States United States Department of State: Background notes on Mauritania This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Department of State website https://www.state.gov/countries-areas/. United States Department of State: Chiefs of Mission for Mauritania United States Department of State: Mauritania United States Embassy in Nouakchott

Rex, North Carolina

Rex is a census-designated place in Robeson County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 55 at the 2010 census, Rex ranked 4th on the list of the highest-income places in the United States. Rex is located at 34°50′53″N 79°2′31″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.7 square miles, all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 55 people, 17 households, 13 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 74.7 people per square mile. There were 17 housing units at an average density of 23.1/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 47.27% White, 40.00% African American, 9.09% Native American, 3.64% from two or more races. There were 17 households out of which 52.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.9% were married couples living together, 17.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 23.5% were non-families. 5.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older.

The average household size was 3.24 and the average family size was 3.69. In the CDP, the population was spread out with 30.9% under the age of 18, 14.5% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 12.7% from 45 to 64, 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.0 males. There are no mercantile operations in Rex; the primary industry is farming related industries. Rex has two CSX railroad crossings as well as its own U. S. Post Office Branch; some of the longtime commercial businesses in Rex were: H. P. Johnson - General Merchandise, R. N. Johnson Grocery, I. J. Williams Grocery. There are three churches in the immediate Rex, NC vicinity: Rex Presbyterian Church, Mount Olive Presbyterian Church, New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church. All of the churches serving this area are over 100 years old