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Henry Every

Henry Every known as Henry Avery, sometimes erroneously given as Jack Avery or John Avery, was an English pirate who operated in the Atlantic and Indian oceans in the mid-1690s. He used several aliases throughout his career, including Benjamin Bridgeman, was known as Long Ben to his crewmen and associates. Dubbed "The Arch Pirate" and "The King of Pirates" by contemporaries, Every was infamous for being one of few major pirate captains to escape with his loot without being arrested or killed in battle, for being the perpetrator of what has been called the most profitable act of piracy in history. Although Every's career as a pirate lasted only two years, his exploits captured the public's imagination, inspired others to take up piracy, spawned works of literature; every began his pirate career while he was first mate aboard the warship Charles II. As the ship lay anchored in the northern Spanish harbor of Corunna, the crew grew discontented as Spain failed to deliver a letter of marque and Charles II's owners failed to pay their wages, they mutinied.

Charles II was renamed the Every elected as the new captain. His most famous raid was on a 25-ship convoy of Grand Mughal vessels making the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, including the treasure-laden Ghanjah dhow Ganj-i-sawai and its escort, the Fateh Muhammed. Joining forces with several pirate vessels, Every found himself in command of a small pirate squadron, they were able to capture up to £600,000 in precious metals and jewels, equivalent to around £91.9 million in 2020, making him the richest pirate in the world. This caused considerable damage to England's fragile relations with the Mughals, a combined bounty of £1,000—an immense sum at the time—was offered by the Privy Council and the East India Company for his capture, leading to the first worldwide manhunt in recorded history. Although a number of his crew were subsequently arrested, Every himself eluded capture, vanishing from all records in 1696. Unconfirmed accounts state he may have changed his name and retired living out the rest of his life in either Britain or an unidentified tropical island, while alternative accounts consider Every may have squandered his riches.

He is considered to have died anywhere between 1699 and 1714. Modern scholarship suggests Every was born on 20 August 1659 in the village of Newton Ferrers, about 9.7 kilometres southeast of Plymouth, Devon. Parish records indicate that he may have been his wife, Anne. According to the deposition of William Phillips, a member of Every's crew who gave a "voluntary confession" after his capture, in August 1696 Every was "aged about 40 years," his mother lived "near Plymouth," and his wife was a periwig seller who lived "in Ratcliffe Highway." Every was married and records indicate that he may have wed one Dorothy Arther at St James Duke's Place in London on 11 September 1690, though there is no evidence that he had any children. The earliest biographical account of the man, The Life and Adventures of Capt. John Avery, states that he was born in 1653 in Cattedown, Plymouth. Although this location and date are now known to be incorrect, they have been cited in earlier literature; the memoir's Dutch author, who wrote his account a little over a decade after the pirate had vanished, uses the name Adrian van Broeck, but this is a pseudonym.

The account tells of Van Broeck's short captivity by Every's crew aboard the Fancy, claims that Every's father was a trading captain who had served in the Royal Navy under Admiral Robert Blake. Several accounts of Every's life, most prominently Daniel Defoe's The King of Pirates, have made reference to the earlier work, but it is of questionable veracity and has been described by the Dictionary of National Biography as "fiction, with scarcely a substratum of fact."Although a theory existed that Every's birth name was Benjamin Bridgeman, that "Henry Every" was in fact an alias, modern scholarship has debunked it. It is accepted by historians that "Henry Every" was the pirate's real name, given that he used this name when he entered the Royal Navy; as this was prior to the onset of his piratical career, he would have had no need for an alias. Every may have been a cousin of the well-known Every baronets, though this has not been proven conclusively; every was a sailor from youth, serving on various Royal Navy ships.

Popular accounts state that Every served aboard the English fleet bombarding Algiers in 1671, buccaneered in the Caribbean Sea, captained a logwood freighter in the Bay of Campeche, although these stories come from Adrian van Broeck's fictional memoir. The substantiated record picks up in March 1689, shortly after the breakout of the Nine Years' War; the Grand Alliance—Bavaria, the Dutch Republic, the Palatinate and Spain—were waging war against Louis XIV of France in an attempt to stop his expansions, it was against this background that Every, now in his early thirties, was working as a midshipman aboard the sixty-four gun battleship HMS Rupert under the command of Sir Francis Wheeler. Every's naval records suggest he was something of a dedicated family man, spending "little of his wages on extras such as tobacco and consigned his pay to his family."In mid-1689, HMS Rup

Buchberg

Buchberg is the name of the following places: Municipalities: Buchberg, Ludwigslust-Parchim district, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany Buchberg SH, Kanton Schaffhausen, SwitzerlandCadastral municipalities and villages: Buchberg bei Steinbühl, village in the borough of Bad Kötzting, Cham district, Bavaria Buchberg bei Wettzell, village in the borough of Bad Kötzting, Cham district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Brennberg, Regensburg district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Bruckberg, Landshut district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Feldkirchen-Westerham, Rosenheim district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Fischbachau, Miesbach district, Bavaria Buchberg, Ortsteil der Marktgemeinde Gangkofen, Rottal-Inn district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the borough of Geretsried, Bad Tölz-Wolfratshausen district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Herrngiersdorf, Kelheim district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Hohenau, Freyung-Grafenau district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Moosthenning, Dingolfing-Landau district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Nußdorf am Inn, Rosenheim district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Offenberg, Deggendorf district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Reut, Rottal-Inn district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Rimsting, Rosenheim district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Schleching, Traunstein district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Sengenthal, Neumarkt in the Oberpfalz district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Taching am See, Traunstein district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the borough of Traunreut, Traunstein district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the borough of Viechtach, Regen district, Bavaria Buchberg, village in the municipality of Wackersberg, Bad Tölz-Wolfratshausen district, Bavaria Buchberg am Kamp, cadastral municipality of Gars am Kamp in Lower Austria Buchberg, cadastral municipality and mountain in Salzburg Buchberg, cadastral municipality in Tyrol Buchberg, cadastral municipality in Salzburg Buchberg, cadastral municipality in the Styria Buchberg, cadastral municipality in Lower Austria Buchberg, cadastral municipality in the Styria a village in the municipality of Bogda, Kreis Timiş, Rumänien a settlement in the Iser Mountains, Czech Republic, now part of the village of JerserkaBuchberg is the name of the following hills and mountains: Buchberg, mountain neari Blumberg, Schwarzwald-Baar district, Baden-Württemberg Buchberg, 674 m, mountain near Kirchenlamitz in theBavarian Fichtelgebirge Buchberg, mountain with Church of the Holy Cross in the municipality of Kiefersfelden in Bavaria, Germany Buchberg, 528 m, highest mountain the Lange Berge, Coburg district, Bavaria Buchberg, mountain with observation tower in Langenselbold, Hesse Buchberg, 801 m, Aussichtsberg in the municipality of Mattsee, Salzburg state Buchberg, 591 m, near Neumarkt, Upper Palatinate, Bavaria Buchberg, 607,3 m, near Seubersdorf, district Neumarkt in the Oberpfalz, Bavaria Buchberg, 652 m, mountain im Zittau Mountains in Saxony, Germany Buchberg, 469 m, lookout mountain near Maria-Anzbach, Lower Austria Buechberg, 631 m, at the Obersee lakeshore, Switzerland Buková hora, 683 m, Bohemian Central Uplands, Czech Republic Buková hora, 958 m, Orlické Mountains, Czech Republic Bukovec, 1,005 m, Iser Mountains, Czech Republic Goldegger Buchberg, 1,200 m, Dienten Mountains, Salzburg state Buchberg near Neusalza-Spremberg, see Sonneberg Puchberg

Chandur Biswa

Chandur Biswa is a village in Nandura tehsil of Buldhana district, Maharashtra State, India. As of 2001 India census, Chandur Biswa had a population of; the village has a gram panchayat. The village's post office PIN code is 443401 and PIN is shared with the Dhanora Vitali, Jigaon and Mominabad post offices; the village has a railway station, named Biswa Bridge, located between Nandura and Malkapur on the BhusawalNagpur section of Bhusawal division of Central Railway. A famous freedom fighter Shri. Jagdavrao Patil was from Chandur Biswa, it is said. He opened a school for orphaned children in Biswa, started a newspaper named Ankur, first newspaper in entire district. Jagdavrao is a good poet, he wrote many poems. He had great knowledge of Bhagvad Gita too