Hermann Eggert

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Hermann Eggert
Neues Rathaus Hannover 2013.jpg
Neues Rathaus Hannover, designed by Eggert
Born
Georg Peter Hermann Eggert

(1844-01-03)3 January 1844
Died12 March 1920(1920-03-12) (aged 76)
EducationBauakademie Berlin
OccupationArchitect
AwardsPrussian Academy of Arts

Georg Peter Hermann Eggert (3 January 1844 – 12 March 1920) was a German architect. He designed important public buildings such as the Frankfurt Main Station and the New Town Hall in Hanover, often in the style of Neo-Renaissance.

Career[edit]

Born in Burg bei Magdeburg, Eggert studied with Heinrich Strack at the Bauakademie in Berlin. [1][2] He worked from 1875 to 1889 as Universitätsbaumeister in Strasbourg,[2] designing several buildings of the university in the Neustadt such as the observatory, and building the Palais du Rhin (Emperor's Palace) for Wilhelm II,[3] he built the Frankfurt Main Station from 1883 to 1888, regarded as his most important building.[1]

Eggert served as Oberbaurat in the Ministerium für öffentliche Arbeiten [de] (Ministry of Public Works) of Prussia in Berlin, where he was mostly responsible for church buildings.[3] He participated in the competition for the New Town Hall in Hanover in 1895, won the second competition a year later and was commissioned to build the exterior.[1] From 1898 he worked in his own office in Hanover, he was in conflict about the design of the Prunkräume (Representative Rooms) of the Town Hall with Christian Heinrich Tramm [de] who had designed the Welfenschloss [de] (Welf palace, now the main building of the University), As a result, his contract was cancelled in 1909.[2]

Many of Eggert's designs are in the style of Neo-Renaissance,[2] he was a member of the Prussian Academy of Arts from 1896 in the section Bildende Künste (Arts).[1] Eggert died in Weimar.[2]

Recognition[edit]

Many of Eggert's designs are held at the Museum of Architecture of the Technische Universität Berlin.[4] In the central Frankfurt Gallus quarter a section of a street called after Camberg was renamed Hermann-Eggert-Straße in 2009.[2]

Selected works and designs[edit]

Literature[edit]

  • Spemanns goldenes Buch vom eigenen Heim 1905, No 493.
  • Alexander Dorner: 100 Jahre Bauen in Hannover. Zur Jahrhundertfeier der Technischen Hochschule. Hannover 1931, p. 26.
  • Christine Kranz-Michaelis: Das Rathaus im Kaiserreich. Kunstpolitische Aspekte einer Bauaufgabe des 19. Jahrhunderts. Kunst, Kultur und Politik im deutschen Kaiserreich}, vol. 4.) Gebr. Mann, Berlin 1982, ISBN 3-7861-1339-4, pp. 395–413.
  • Wolfgang Steinweg: Das Rathaus in Hannover. Von der Kaiserzeit bis in die Gegenwart. Schlüter, Hannover 1988, ISBN 3-87706-287-3, p. 38f

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Nüchterlein, Paul. "Eggert, Georg Peter Hermann" (in German). University of Magdeburg. Retrieved 7 August 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Knocke, Helmut. Eggert, Georg Peter Hermann. Hannoversches Biographisches Lexikon [de] (in German). p. 105.
  3. ^ a b "Georg Peter Hermann Eggert / Architekt, Baumeister, Redakteur, Geheimer Oberbaurat" (in German). Burg. Retrieved 7 August 2015.
  4. ^ "Hermann Eggert: Projekte / (im Bestand des Architekturmuseums)" (in German). Museum of Architecture. Retrieved 7 August 2015.

External links[edit]