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Hidden Hills, California

Hidden Hills is a city and gated community in Los Angeles County, California. It is located in the west San Fernando Valley, it is notable for being home to many celebrities. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 1,856. Hidden Hills is in the southern Simi Hills Transverse range near the Santa Monica Mountains, is located at 34°10′3″N 118°39′39″W; the community was designed and developed in the 1950s by A. E. Hanson, a Southern California landscape architect and planned community developer, his earlier projects included Rolling Hills and Palos Verdes Estates, the 1920s Beverly Hills Harold Lloyd Estate'Greenacres.' It is a gated residential community with a total all land area of 1.7 square miles. An elementary school is publicly accessible at one of the three gates to the community; the city has a summer camp for children and children's theatre programs, annual parades, parties, welcome wagon, snow days, weekly community-wide barbecues all summer long. Hidden Hills is bordered on the north by the nature reserve and greenbelt of the Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve, a park with miles of equestrian and mountain biking trails.

Nearby to the south is the pioneer Leonis Adobe National Historic Landmark, with gardens and a historical Museum. It's across the historic El Camino Real of the Spanish Las Californias and Mexican Alta California eras, now U. S. Route 101; the city was the setting of a short-lived NBC sitcom Hidden Hills, which aired in 2002–2003. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,875 people, 568 households, 506 families residing in the city; the population density was 1,135.0 inhabitants per square mile. There were 592 housing units at an average density of 358.3 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 88.70% White, 0.44% Black or African American, 0.12% Native American, 2.71% Asian, 1.55% from other races, 1.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race 6.24% of the population. There were 568 households out of which 50.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 81.7% were married couples living together, 5.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 10.9% were non-families.

7.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.30 and the average family size was 3.39. In the city the population was spread out with 33.0% under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 20.9% from 25 to 44, 31.9% from 45 to 64, 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males. Females had a median income of $95,667; the per capita income for the city was $194,096. No families and none of the population were below the poverty line; the 2010 United States Census reported that Hidden Hills had a population of 1,856. The population density was 1,099.1 people per square mile. The racial makeup of Hidden Hills was 1,713 White, 37 African American, 3 Native American, 42 Asian, 1 Pacific Islander, 30 from other races, 30 from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 123 persons.

The Census reported that 1,856 people lived in households, 0 lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, 0 were institutionalized. There were 593 households, out of which 269 had children under the age of 18 living in them, 453 were opposite-sex married couples living together, 40 had a female householder with no husband present, 24 had a male householder with no wife present. There were 9 unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, 6 same-sex married couples or partnerships. 61 households were made up of individuals and 39 had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.13. There were 517 families; the population was spread out with 531 people under the age of 18, 125 people aged 18 to 24, 245 people aged 25 to 44, 660 people aged 45 to 64, 295 people who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.8 years. For every 100 females there were 96.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males. There were 626 housing units at an average density of 370.7 per square mile, of which 552 were owner-occupied, 41 were occupied by renters.

The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.4%. 1,743 people lived in owner-occupied housing units and 113 people lived in rental housing units. According to the United States Census Bureau, Hidden Hills has a median household income of $203,199. No families and none of the population were below the poverty line; the Los Angeles Times found the median annual household income in Hidden Hills to be $203,199. In the California State Legislature, Hidden Hills is located within the 27th Senate District, represented by Democrat Henry Stern, in the 45th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Jesse Gabriel. In the United States House of Representatives, Hidden Hills is located within California's 30th congressional district, represented by Democrat Brad Sherman. Hidden Hills has traditionally been won by Republican candidates for public office. However, the 2016 United States Presidential election represented a substantial swing toward the Democratic Party in Hidden Hills, with Hillary Clinton carrying the town.

In the 2004 United States Presidential Election, incumbent Republican President George W. Bush r

Internet censorship and surveillance in Asia

This list of Internet censorship and surveillance in Asia provides information on the types and levels of Internet censorship and surveillance, occurring in countries in Asia. Detailed country by country information on Internet censorship and surveillance is provided in the Freedom on the Net reports from Freedom House, by the OpenNet Initiative, by Reporters Without Borders, in the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices from the U. S. State Department Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, Labor; the ratings produced by several of these organizations are summarized below as well as in the Censorship by country article. The level of Internet censorship and surveillance in a country is classified in one of the four categories: pervasive, substantial and little or no censorship or surveillance; the classifications are based on the classifications and ratings from the Freedom on the Net reports by Freedom House supplemented with information from the OpenNet Initiative, Reporters Without Borders, the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices by the U.

S. State Department Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, Labor. Pervasive censorship or surveillance: A country is classified as engaged in pervasive censorship or surveillance when it censors political and other content, is engaged in mass surveillance of the Internet, retaliates against citizens who circumvent censorship or surveillance with imprisonment or other sanctions. A country is included in the "pervasive" category when it: is rated as "not free" with a total score of 71 to 100 in the Freedom on the Net report from Freedom House, is rated "not free" in FOTN or is not rated in FOTN and is included on the "Internet enemies" list from Reporters Without Borders, or when the OpenNet Initiative categorizes the level of Internet filtering as pervasive in any of the four areas for which they test. Substantial censorship or surveillance: Countries included in this classification are engaged in substantial Internet censorship and surveillance; this includes countries where a number of categories are subject to a medium level of filtering or many categories are subject to a low level of filtering.

A country is included in the "substantial" category when it: is not included in the "pervasive" category, is rated as "not free" in the Freedom on the Net report from Freedom House, or is rated "partly free" or is not rated in FOTN, is included on the "Internet enemies" list from Reporters Without Borders, or when the OpenNet Initiative categorizes the level of Internet filtering as pervasive or substantial in any of the four areas for which they test. Selective censorship or surveillance: Countries included in this classification were found to practice selective Internet censorship and surveillance; this includes countries where a small number of specific sites are blocked or censorship targets a small number of categories or issues. A country is included in the "selective" category when it: is not included in the "pervasive" or "substantial" categories, is rated as "partly free" in the Freedom on the Net report from Freedom House, or is included on the "Internet enemies" list from Reporters Without Borders, or is not rated in FOTN and the OpenNet Initiative categorizes the level of Internet filtering as selective in any of the four areas for which they test.

Little or no censorship or surveillance: A country is included in the "little or no censorship or surveillance" category when it is not included in the "pervasive", "substantial" or "selective" categories. This classification includes countries that are listed as "free" on the Freedom on the Net list from Freedom House, are not listed as "Enemies of the Internet" by Reporters Without Borders, for which no evidence of Internet filtering was found by the OpenNet Initiative in any of the four areas for which they test. Other controls such as voluntary filtering, self-censorship, other types of public or private action to limit child pornography, hate speech, defamation, or theft of intellectual property exist; the various nation sections, include ratings by ONI, RWB, etc. Rated "not free" by Freedom House in Freedom on the Net in 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018. Listed as pervasive in the political and social areas, as substantial in Internet tools, as selective in conflict/security by ONI in August 2009.

Listed as an Enemy of the Internet by RWB in 2012. Listed as a State Enemy of the Internet by RWB in 2013 for involvement in active, intrusive surveillance of news providers, resulting in grave violations of freedom of information and human rights. Bahrain enforces an effective news blackout using an array of repressive measures, including keeping the international media away, harassing human rights activists, arresting bloggers and other online activists, prosecuting free speech activists, disrupting communications during major demonstrations. On 5 January 2009 the Ministry of Culture and Information issued an order pursuant to the Telecommunications Law and Press and Publications Law of Bahrain that regulates the blocking and unblocking of websites; this resolution requires all ISPs – among other things – to procure and install a website blocking software solution chosen by the Ministry. The Telecommunications Regulatory Authority assisted the Ministry of Culture and Information in the execution of the said Resolution by coordinating the procurement o

Federal Drug Control Service of Russia

The Federal Drug Control Service of the Russian Federation or FSKN was a federal law enforcement agency of executive authority responsible for drafting state policy, legal regulation and monitoring in combating trafficking drugs, psychotropic substances, their precursors. The Federal Drug Control Service of the Russian Federation was specially authorized to address and solve problems relating to traffic in narcotic drugs, psychotropic substances, their precursors. Was known as The Drugs Police; the FSKN shared concurrent jurisdiction with the Federal Security Service of Russia and MVD. The FSKN has sole responsibility for coordinating and pursuing Russian drug investigations abroad in Central Asia. On April 5, 2016 the Federal Drug Control Service was dissolved, its functions and authorities are transferred to Main Drugs Control Directorate of the Ministry of Internal Affairs; the first Anti-Drugs Independent Russian Agency was born on 24 September 2002 under the name "The State Committee for Combat the Illicit Trafficking in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances under the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation".

On March 11, 2003 the State Committee for combat the illicit trafficking in narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances under the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation was transformed into the State Committee of Russian Federation to Monitor the Trafficking of Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances. That organization became the Federal Drug Control Service of Russia. Viktor Cherkesov was appointed to the chairman of the committee; the Committee passed the material base and the majority, staff number of the abolished Federal Tax Police Service of the Russian Federation. The Committee began its operations on July 1, 2003. On June 6, 2003, the Duma approved the Regulations on the State Committee of Russian Federation for the control of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances. On March 9, 2004, The Russian Federal Drug Control Service was renamed the Federal Service of the Russian Federation for the control of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances and on July 28, 2004, the Russian Federal Service for Control over Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances was renamed the Russian Federal Service for Drug Control.

On May 12, 2008, the President of Russia dismissed Viktor Cherkesov as Director of Russian Federal Drug Control Service. On May 15, 2008, President Dmitry Medvedev appointed the former KGB general Viktor Ivanov as a Director of Russian Federal Drug Control Service. On June 1, 2016 the FSKN will be replaced by the Main Directorate for Drugs Control of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation. State Anti-Drugs Committee Federal Drug Control Service Directorate for Analytical Coordination Operative Directorate Operation and Search Directorate Directorate for coordination of Operative Activities Directorate for combating against Drug Crimes in Transportation Dorectorate for combating against illegal activities in narcotics sphere Directorate for combating against Money laundering Department for International Cooperation Investigative Department Dept. for Special Technic Activities Department for Internal Security Directorate for Special Communications Directorate for Special Purpose "Grom" Unit – A special unit designed to fight against illegal drugs crimes and Narco-Mafia Medical Directorate Directorate for Technic Support The main tasks of Russian Federal Drug Control Service are: monitoring the trafficking of drugs.

On February 16, 2008 the Decree of Russian President Vladimir Putin, the day on March 11 announced the official professional holiday – the Day of Drug Control Authorities. Criticism of the organization is related to legal collisions. For example, in 2004, the use of analgesic medication ketamine has been explicitly forbidden for use in veterinary clinics after it has been qualified as a drug of abuse. Veterinarians, to alleviate the suffering of animals, broke the law as a result of a conflict between the legal and moral implications; the most "sensational" case was the process of Alexandra Duque. Criticism is drawn by the Federal Drug Control Service rigging results of substance inspections, improper scheduling and using vague and unspecific drug analog laws Main Directorate for Drugs Control, successor DEA, the U. S. counterpart United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime International Narcotics Control Caucus International Narcotics Control Board Anti-Narcotics Force Two famous films were made in Russia about and paid by it: Tiski by Valery Todorovsky, starring Maksim Matveev, Fyodor Bondarchuk and Aleksey Serebryakov Antidur by Vladimir Shchegolkov.

Путеводитель по спецслужбам России. Центр политической

Namibia–Sweden relations

Namibia–Sweden relations refers to the current and historical relationship of Namibia and Sweden. Namibia maintains an embassy in Stockholm, while Sweden closed its embassy in Windhoek in 2008. Sweden was a strong supporter of the Namibian independence movement. From Namibia's independence in 1990 until 2007, Sweden was a primary donor of aid to develop Namibia's public sector but, in 2007, development aid began to be scaled back; the close relationship between Namibia and the Nordic countries can be explained by the fact that they share an overwhelmingly Lutheran population. Finnish missionaries conducted proselytism in Ovamboland from the onwards. Economic links between Sweden and Namibia remained scarse, however. During the 1970s and 1980s, trade with Namibia never reached more than 0.003% of the total Swedish foreign trade. Contacts between Sweden and SWANU began in the early 1960s, as Namibian students from SWANU obtained scholarships to study in Sweden. A close relationship was formed between the Social Democratic Party.

Contacts between Sweden and SWAPO began after the 1966 International Conference on South West Africa, held in Oxford. Representatives from all parliamentary parties from Sweden took part in the conference. In the same year two Swedish newspapers and Arbetet, initiated a fund-raising campaign for SWANU and SWAPO. Moreover, the National Union of South West African Students was founded in Uppsala in 1966, organized jointly by SWANU and SWAPO. In 1969 the Swedish parliament voted to initiate official assistance to SWAPO. In 1971 SWAPO established a representation in Sweden, in charge of relations with the Nordic countries, West Germany and Austria. SWAPO was the sole Namibian nationalist movement. However, Sweden did not subscribe to the UN General Assembly resolution of 1973 that declared SWAPO as the sole legitimate representative of the Namibian people. Rather, Swedish governments during the 1970s described SWAPO as the leading force of the Namibian independence campaign. Financial assistance to SWAPO was modest at first, but increased.

By 1976 Sweden was the largest SWAPO donor outside the Socialist Bloc. Financial aid to SWAPO was increased under the Thorbjörn Fälldin government. By February 1977 Hifikepunye Pohamba stated that Sweden was either the largest or second largest donor to SWAPO. Support for SWAPO from Swedish civil society and trade unions was significant. Official Swedish assistance to SWAPO was of civilian nature. However, both the Social Democratic and non-socialist governments recognized the right of SWAPO to engage in armed resistance against South Africa. In 2009, the Legal Assistance Centre in Namibia accused Sveriges Television, the national television station of Sweden, of exploiting ethnic minorities in Namibia in the TV show'The Great Journey'; the show featured Swedish families living with the Himba ethnic group. The LAC said the show "permeated by a lack of respect," and "uses stereotypes reminiscent of colonial times in its marketing of the programme." Embassy of Namibia to the Nordic and the Baltic States in Stockholm

Jackson Mound

The Jackson Mound is a Native American mound in the south-central portion of the U. S. state of Ohio. Located north of Pancoastburg in Fayette County, it measures 75 feet in diameter and 5.5 feet in height. The mound has never been excavated. If true, it was more conical in shape, it is to cover the remains of a wooden charnel house built by the Adena. An archaeological survey performed in 1914 listed forty-two different mounds in Fayette County, but the Jackson Mound is the only one that has survived to the present day. For this reason, it is a significant archaeological site. In recognition of its archaeological value, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in late 1975, being the county's only archaeological site to be accorded this distinction

Express Yourself (Charles Wright & the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band song)

"Express Yourself" is a song written by Charles Wright and performed by Charles Wright & the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band. It was released in 1970 as the title song of their 1970 album, Express Yourself, is their signature song, it reached #12 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was their biggest hit on the U. S. R&B chart, reaching #3; the song was produced by Wright. The single was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals in 1971, losing to The Delfonics song "Didn't I" and ranked #57 on Billboard's Year-End Hot 100 singles of 1970. Idris Muhammad released a version of the song on his 1971 album, Black Rhythm Revolution! N. W. A sampled this song in their 1989 song titled "Express Yourself". A member of N. W. A. Eazy-E, is a nephew of Wright; the song reached #40 on the U. S. R&B chart and #50 on the UK Singles Chart, it was featured on Straight Outta Compton. Saccharine Trust released a version of the song on Past Lives. Roger and Fu-Schnickens covered the song on the 1993 soundtrack album Addams Family Values: Music from the Motion Picture.

The House Jacks recorded a version for Tommy Boy Records that appears on Funkwich. Francis Rocco Prestia recorded a version that appears on his 1999 album... Everybody on the Bus with vocals by Tamara Champlin. Snooks Eaglin covered the song on his 2002 album The Way. Tinchy Stryder sampled the song on his 2009 album, Catch 22 on the song "Express Urself". Labrinth sampled the song on the track "Express Yourself" from his 2012 album Electronic Earth; the song reached #12 on the UK Singles Chart. The song appears in the teaser trailer for the 2017 film The Emoji Movie, it was featured in an Windows 8 all-in-one PC 2012 commercial. A version of the song by Fu-Schnickens was featured at the end credits of the 1993 film Addams Family Values; the song appears in the 2000 film Remember the Titans. The Mocean Worker Remix of the song was featured during the end credits of the 2005 film Guess; the song appears during the fight scene in the 2005 film Mrs. Smith; the song is featured in the video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas on radio station Master Sounds 98.3.

The song is featured in the video game Driver: Parallel Lines where it plays in the 1978 era. A cover version by Jason Mraz was featured in 2005 film Cheaper by the Dozen 2