House Range

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House Range
A photo of the northern part of the House Range at sunset
Northern part of the House Range at sunset-(Swasey Mountain section), showing the stratigraphy
Highest point
PeakSwasey Peak
Elevation9,669 ft (2,947 m)
Coordinates39°23′17″N 113°18′59″W / 39.388142°N 113.316408°W / 39.388142; -113.316408Coordinates: 39°23′17″N 113°18′59″W / 39.388142°N 113.316408°W / 39.388142; -113.316408
Dimensions
Length70 mi (110 km) N/S
Width34 mi (55 km) E/W
Area1,242 sq mi (3,220 km2)
Geography
A map of Utah showing the location of the House Range
A map of Utah showing the location of the House Range
House Range
CountryUnited States
StateMillard County, Utah
"Spring Storm in the Great Basin" — House Range and Tule Valley.

The House Range is a north-south trending mountain range in Millard County, of west-central Utah. The House Range was named in 1859 by James H. Simpson. It was named by Simpson because "...of its well-defined stratification and the resemblance of portions of its outline to domes, minarets, houses, and other structures."[1]

Geography[edit]

The House Range is bounded by Tule Valley to the west, Whirlwind Valley and Sevier Desert to the east, and trends with the Fish Springs Range to the north; the range has three notable passes: Skull Rock Pass (which US Highway 6/US Highway 50 travels through), Marjum Canyon (which the old US Highway 6 travels through), and Sand Pass (which the Weiss Highway passes through).

The highest point in the House Range is Swasey Peak, at 9,669 feet (2,947 m).[2] Other notable peaks include Notch Peak, a frequent climbing and base-jumping hotspot, and the very square Tatow Knob.

It is also known for one of the tallest limestone cliffs in the world, Notch Peak.

Geology[edit]

The geology of the House Range is dominated by gray Cambrian to Devonian carbonate rock which was intruded by a pink Jurassic granitoid in the central part of the range. In the Wheeler Amphitheater, away from the intrusion, the Lagerstätte that contains the well-preserved fauna is found in the Cambrian section of the range. Evidence of Lake Bonneville's presence is found both in shorelines and white marls at the base of the range; the main structural component to the range is a large basin-bounding fault on the west side.[3]

Fossils[edit]

The range is known for a fossil Lagerstätte (Wheeler Shale) of Cambrian age, which has an array of Burgess Shale type fauna, including Elrathia kingii, a trilobite that is one of Utah's most famous fossils.[4][5]

Stratigraphy[edit]

The Swasey Limestone was deposited in the BathyuriscusElrathina zone (contemporaneous with the Burgess Shale); this is overlain in turn by the Bolaspidella zone (uppermost Middle Cambrian) Wheeler Shale and Marjum Formation, then the Cedaria zone (lowermost Upper Cambrian) Weeks Formation.[6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Van Cott, J. W., 1990, Utah Place Names, ISBN 0-87480-345-4
  2. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Swasey Peak". USGS.
  3. ^ Chronic, Halka (1990). Roadside Geology of Utah. ISBN 0-87842-228-5.
  4. ^ "Localities of the Cambrian: The House Range UCMP".
  5. ^ "House Range". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved January 13, 2013.
  6. ^ Robison, R. A. (1964). "Upper Middle Cambrian Stratigraphy of Western Utah". Geological Society of America Bulletin. 75: 995–1010. doi:10.1130/0016-7606(1964)75[995:UMCSOW]2.0.CO;2. ISSN 0016-7606.
  7. ^ "House Range Cambrian Stratigraphy". fossilmuseum.net. Retrieved 14 October 2013.
Notch Peak, a notable limestone cliff in the southern part of the House Range, Utah.

External links[edit]