Iceland national football team

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Iceland
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Strákarnir okkar (Our Boys)
Association Football Association of Iceland (KSÍ)
Knattspyrnusamband Íslands
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Heimir Hallgrímsson
Captain Aron Gunnarsson
Most caps Rúnar Kristinsson (106)
Top scorer Eiður Guðjohnsen (26)
Home stadium Laugardalsvöllur
FIFA code ISL
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 22 Steady (17 May 2018)
Highest 18 (February–March 2018)
Lowest 131 (April–June 2012)
Elo ranking
Current 22 Steady (20 April 2018)
Highest 19 (October 2017)
Lowest 128 (August 1973)
First international
Unofficial:
 Faroe Islands 0–1 Iceland 
(Faroe Islands; 29 July 1930)[1]
Official:
 Iceland 0–3 Denmark 
(Reykjavík, Iceland; 17 July 1946)[2]
Biggest win
Unofficial:
 Iceland 9–0 Faroe Islands 
(Keflavík, Iceland; 10 July 1985)
Official:
 Iceland 5–0 Malta 
(Reykjavík, Iceland; 27 July 2000)[3]
Biggest defeat
 Denmark 14–2 Iceland 
(Copenhagen, Denmark; 23 August 1967)
World Cup
Appearances 1 (first in 2018)
UEFA Euro
Appearances 1 (first in 2016)
Best result Quarter-finals, 2016
A friendly match between Iceland and Slovakia, at the Laugardalsvöllur in Reykjavík, Iceland

The Iceland men's national football team (Icelandic: Íslenska karlalandsliðið í knattspyrnu) represents Iceland in international football. The team is controlled by the Football Association of Iceland.

The team has enjoyed success in the second half of the 2010s; in the qualifying rounds for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, Iceland reached the playoffs before losing to Croatia. Iceland reached its first major tournament, UEFA Euro 2016, after a qualification campaign which included home and away wins over the Netherlands; in doing so, they became the smallest ever nation to qualify for a major tournament. After advancing to the knockout stages of Euro 2016, Iceland defeated England in the Round of 16, advancing to the quarter-finals, where they lost to host nation France 5–2.

They became the smallest nation by population to ever clinch a FIFA World Cup berth when they qualified for the 2018 FIFA World Cup on 9 October 2017.[4]

History[edit]

1900s[edit]

Although Úrvalsdeild, the Icelandic Football League, was founded in 1912,[5] the country's first international match was only played on 29 July 1930, against the Faroe Islands.[6] Although Iceland won 1–0 away, both teams were at the time unaffiliated with FIFA.[citation needed] The first match officially recognised by FIFA took place in Reykjavík on 17 July 1946, a 0–3 defeat to Denmark,[7] the first international victory was against Finland in 1947.[8] For the first 20 years of the Football Association of Iceland (KSÍ)'s existence, mostly the team did not participate in qualifying for the FIFA World Cup or the UEFA European Championship. In 1954, Iceland applied to take part in qualification for the 1954 World Cup, but the application was rejected;[6] in qualification for the 1958 World Cup, Iceland finished last in their group with zero wins and with 26 goals against.[6]

Since 1974, the team has taken part in qualifying for every World Cup and European Championship; in 1994, the team was awarded their then best ever position in the FIFA World Rankings, 37th. This record stood until 2016 when they managed to reach 21st. [9] In a friendly against Estonia on 24 April 1996 in Tallinn, Eiður Smári Guðjohnsen entered as a substitute for his father Arnór. This marked the first time that a father and son played in the same international match.[10]

2000s and 2010s[edit]

In qualification for Euro 2004, Iceland finished third in their group, one point behind Scotland,[11] as a result, they failed to qualify for a playoff spot.[12]

In 2014, Iceland almost became the smallest nation to reach the World Cup.[13] Finishing second in Group D, they played Croatia in a two-leg playoff for qualification,[14][15] after holding them to a 0–0 draw in the home leg, they lost 2–0 away.[16]

Iceland qualified for a major tournament for the first time in 2015 after finishing second in Group A of qualification for Euro 2016, losing only two games, and beating the Netherlands – which had finished third in the 2014 World Cup – twice,[17] during the qualification, they reached their then highest ranking in the FIFA World Rankings, 23rd.[18][19] Iceland were drawn into a group with Portugal, Hungary and Austria for the final tournament.

At the tournament finals, Iceland recorded 1–1 draws in their first two group stage matches against Portugal and Hungary, they then advanced from their pool with a 2–1 victory against Austria.[20] Iceland qualified for the tournament's quarter-finals after a shock 2–1 win over England in the Round of 16, which led England manager Roy Hodgson to resign immediately after the final whistle.[21] However, they were eliminated by host nation France in the quarter-finals, 5–2.[22]

Iceland qualified for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, their first ever appearance in the world championship, securing qualification on 9 October 2017 after a 2–0 win against Kosovo, they became the lowest-populated country to reach the final tournament.[23]

Competitive record[edit]

For the all-time record of the national team against opposing nations, see the team's all-time record page.

FIFA World Cup[edit]

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 Did not enter
Italy 1934
France 1938
Brazil 1950
Switzerland 1954 Entry not accepted by FIFA
Sweden 1958 Did not qualify 4 0 0 4 6 26
Chile 1962 Did not enter
England 1966
Mexico 1970
West Germany 1974 Did not qualify 6 0 0 6 2 29
Argentina 1978 6 1 0 5 2 12
Spain 1982 8 2 2 4 10 21
Mexico 1986 6 1 0 5 4 10
Italy 1990 8 1 4 3 6 11
United States 1994 8 3 2 3 7 6
France 1998 10 2 3 5 11 16
South Korea Japan 2002 10 4 1 5 14 20
Germany 2006 10 1 1 8 14 27
South Africa 2010 8 1 2 5 7 13
Brazil 2014 12 5 3 4 17 17
Russia 2018 Qualified 10 7 1 2 16 7
Qatar 2022 TBD 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total TBD 1/22 0 0 0 0 0 0 106 28 19 59 116 215

European Championship record[edit]

UEFA European Championship record UEFA European Championship qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
France 1960 Did not enter
Spain 1964 Did not qualify 2 0 1 1 3 5
Italy 1968 Did not enter
Belgium 1972
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1976 Did not qualify 6 1 2 3 3 8
Italy 1980 8 0 0 8 2 21
France 1984 8 1 1 6 3 13
West Germany 1988 8 2 2 4 4 14
Sweden 1992 8 2 0 6 7 10
England 1996 8 1 2 5 3 12
Belgium Netherlands 2000 10 4 3 3 12 7
Portugal 2004 8 4 1 3 11 9
Austria Switzerland 2008 12 2 2 8 10 27
Poland Ukraine 2012 8 1 1 6 6 14
France 2016 Quarter-finals 8th 5 2 2 1 8 9 10 6 2 2 17 6
European Union 2020 TBD 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Quarter-finals 1/16 5 2 2 1 8 9 96 24 17 55 81 146

UEFA Nations League[edit]

UEFA Nations League record
Year Division Group Round Pos Pld W D L GF GA
2018–19 A 2 To be determined
Total 0/1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Schedule and recent results[edit]

Last updated 14 January 2018.[24][25][26][27]

  Win   Draw   Loss

2017[edit]

2018[edit]

  • 1 Not an international FIFA match "A".

Standings[edit]

2018 FIFA World Cup[edit]

Group D

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification  ARG  ISL  CRO  NGA
1  Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Advance to knockout stage
2  Iceland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3  Croatia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4  Nigeria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
First match(es) will be played on 16 June 2018. Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers


UEFA Nations League[edit]

2018–19 UEFA Nations League A - Group 2

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1  Belgium 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Qualification to Nations League Finals 12 Oct 15 Nov
2   Switzerland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 Nov 8 Sep
3  Iceland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Relegation to League B 11 Sep 15 Oct
First match(es) will be played on 8 September 2018. Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers

Coaching staff[edit]

Position Name
Head coach Iceland Heimir Hallgrímsson
Assistant coach Iceland Helgi Kolviðsson
Goalkeeping coach Iceland Guðmundur Hreiðarsson
Trainer Germany Sebastian Boxleitner

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

The following 23 players were called up for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, as well as two friendly matches against Norway and Ghana on 2 June 2018 and 7 June 2018 respectively.[28]
All caps and goals are correct as of 27 March 2018 after the match against Peru.

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Hannes Þór Halldórsson (1984-04-27) 27 April 1984 (age 34) 48 0 Denmark Randers
12 1GK Frederik Schram (1995-01-19) 19 January 1995 (age 23) 3 0 Denmark Roskilde
13 1GK Rúnar Alex Rúnarsson (1995-02-18) 18 February 1995 (age 23) 3 0 Denmark Nordsjælland

2 2DF Birkir Már Sævarsson (1984-11-11) 11 November 1984 (age 33) 78 1 Iceland Valur
3 2DF Samúel Friðjónsson (1996-02-22) 22 February 1996 (age 22) 3 0 Norway Vålerenga
5 2DF Sverrir Ingi Ingason (1993-08-05) 5 August 1993 (age 24) 18 3 Russia Rostov
6 2DF Ragnar Sigurðsson (1986-06-19) 19 June 1986 (age 31) 75 3 Russia Rostov
14 2DF Kári Árnason (1982-10-13) 13 October 1982 (age 35) 65 4 Iceland Víkingur
15 2DF Hólmar Örn Eyjólfsson (1990-08-06) 6 August 1990 (age 27) 9 1 Bulgaria Levski Sofia
18 2DF Hörður Björgvin Magnússon (1993-02-11) 11 February 1993 (age 25) 15 2 England Bristol City
23 2DF Ari Freyr Skúlason (1987-05-14) 14 May 1987 (age 31) 54 0 Belgium Lokeren

7 3MF Jóhann Berg Guðmundsson (1990-10-27) 27 October 1990 (age 27) 65 7 England Burnley
8 3MF Birkir Bjarnason (1988-05-27) 27 May 1988 (age 30) 65 9 England Aston Villa
10 3MF Gylfi Sigurðsson (1989-09-08) 8 September 1989 (age 28) 55 18 England Everton
16 3MF Ólafur Ingi Skúlason (1983-04-01) 1 April 1983 (age 35) 35 1 Turkey Kardemir Karabükspor
17 3MF Aron Gunnarsson (Captain) (1989-04-22) 22 April 1989 (age 29) 77 2 Wales Cardiff City
19 3MF Rúrik Gíslason (1988-02-25) 25 February 1988 (age 30) 45 3 Germany Sandhausen
20 3MF Emil Hallfreðsson (1984-06-29) 29 June 1984 (age 33) 62 1 Italy Udinese
21 3MF Arnór Ingvi Traustason (1993-04-30) 30 April 1993 (age 25) 18 5 Sweden Malmö

4 4FW Albert Guðmundsson (1997-06-15) 15 June 1997 (age 20) 4 3 Netherlands PSV
9 4FW Björn Bergmann Sigurðarson (1991-02-26) 26 February 1991 (age 27) 10 1 Russia Rostov
11 4FW Alfreð Finnbogason (1989-02-01) 1 February 1989 (age 29) 45 11 Germany Augsburg
22 4FW Jón Daði Böðvarsson (1992-05-25) 25 May 1992 (age 26) 36 2 England Reading

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players have been called up to the Iceland squad in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Ögmundur Kristinsson (1989-06-19) 19 June 1989 (age 28) 15 0 Netherlands Excelsior v.  Peru, 27 March 2018
GK Ingvar Jónsson (1989-10-18) 18 October 1989 (age 28) 7 0 Norway Sandefjord v.  Peru, 27 March 2018
GK Anton Ari Einarsson (1994-08-25) 25 August 1994 (age 23) 1 0 Iceland Valur v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018

DF Jón Guðni Fjóluson (1989-04-10) 10 April 1989 (age 29) 13 1 Sweden IFK Norrköping v.  Peru, 27 March 2018
DF Hjörtur Hermannsson (1995-02-08) 8 February 1995 (age 23) 7 1 Denmark Brøndby v.  Peru, 27 March 2018
DF Haukur Heiðar Hauksson (1991-09-01) 1 September 1991 (age 26) 7 0 Sweden AIK v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
DF Böðvar Böðvarsson (1995-04-09) 9 April 1995 (age 23) 4 0 Poland Jagiellonia Białystok v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
DF Viðar Ari Jónsson (1994-03-10) 10 March 1994 (age 24) 4 0 Norway Brann v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
DF Orri Sigurður Ómarsson (1995-02-18) 18 February 1995 (age 23) 4 0 Norway Sarpsborg v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
DF Felix Örn Friðriksson (1999-03-16) 16 March 1999 (age 19) 2 0 Iceland ÍBV v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
DF Diego Johannesson (1993-10-03) 3 October 1993 (age 24) 3 0 Spain Oviedo v.  Qatar, 14 November 2017

MF Theódór Elmar Bjarnason (1987-03-04) 4 March 1987 (age 31) 40 1 Turkey Elazığspor v.  Peru, 27 March 2018
MF Arnór Smárason (1988-09-07) 7 September 1988 (age 29) 24 3 Sweden Hammarby v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
MF Aron Sigurðarson (1993-10-08) 8 October 1993 (age 24) 6 2 Norway Start v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
MF Hilmar Árni Halldórsson (1992-02-14) 14 February 1992 (age 26) 2 0 Iceland Stjarnan v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
MF Mikael Anderson (1998-07-01) 1 July 1998 (age 19) 1 0 Denmark Vendsyssel v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
MF Rúnar Már Sigurjónsson (1990-06-18) 18 June 1990 (age 27) 15 1 Switzerland St. Gallen v.  Qatar, 14 November 2017

FW Kolbeinn Sigþórsson (1990-03-14) 14 March 1990 (age 28) 44 22 France Nantes v.  Peru, 27 March 2018
FW Viðar Örn Kjartansson (1990-03-11) 11 March 1990 (age 28) 18 2 Israel Maccabi Tel Aviv v.  Peru, 27 March 2018
FW Kjartan Finnbogason (1986-07-09) 9 July 1986 (age 31) 11 2 Denmark Horsens v.  Peru, 27 March 2018
FW Óttar Magnús Karlsson (1997-02-21) 21 February 1997 (age 21) 5 1 Sweden Trelleborg v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
FW Kristján Flóki Finnbogason (1995-01-12) 12 January 1995 (age 23) 4 1 Norway Start v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
FW Tryggvi Hrafn Haraldsson (1996-09-30) 30 September 1996 (age 21) 3 1 Sweden Halmstad v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018
FW Andri Rúnar Bjarnason (1990-11-12) 12 November 1990 (age 27) 2 1 Sweden Helsingborg v.  Indonesia, 14 January 2018

Previous squads[edit]

Kit providers[edit]

The official kit is currently produced by Italian sports manufacturing company Erreà since 2002, before that the kit providers were Umbro (1975), Adidas (1976–1992), ABM (1992-1996) and Reusch (1996–2001).

Period Kit provider
1975 England Umbro
1976–1991 Germany Adidas
1992–1996 Italy ABM
1996–2001 Germany Reusch
2002–present Italy Erreà

Most caps and goals[edit]

Most caps[edit]

As of 28 March 2018, the 20 players with the most caps for Iceland are:

Note: Some unofficial matches are counted for some players playing pre-1990, as per the KSÍ count.

Hermann Hreiðarsson played 89 games for Iceland between 1996 and 2011, which puts him second in the nation's appearances list.
Rank Name Career Caps Goals
1 Rúnar Kristinsson 1987–2004 104 3
2 Hermann Hreiðarsson 1996–2011 89 5
3 Eiður Guðjohnsen 1996–2016 88 26
4 Guðni Bergsson 1984–2003 80 1
5 Birkir Már Sævarsson 2007– 78 1
6 Aron Einar Gunnarsson 2008– 77 2
7 Ragnar Sigurðsson 2007– 75 3
8 Brynjar Björn Gunnarsson 1997–2009 74 4
Birkir Kristinsson 1988–2004 74 0
10 Arnór Guðjohnsen 1979–1997 73 14
11 Ólafur Þórðarson 1984–1996 72 5
12 Arnar Grétarsson 1991–2004 71 2
Árni Gautur Arason 1998–2010 71 0
14 Atli Eðvaldsson 1976–1991 70 8
15 Sævar Jónsson 1980–1992 69 1
16 Marteinn Geirsson 1971–1982 67 8
17 Eyjólfur Sverrisson 1990–2001 66 10
18 Sigurður Jónsson 1983–1999 65 3
Indriði Sigurðsson 2000–2014 65 2
Kári Árnason 2005– 65 4
Jóhann Berg Guðmundsson 2008– 65 7
Birkir Bjarnason 2010– 65 9

In bold players still playing or available for selection.

Top goalscorers[edit]

As of 28 March 2018, the 20 players with the most goals for Iceland are:

Note: Some unofficial matches are counted for some players playing pre-1990, as per the KSÍ count.

Eiður Smári Guðjohnsen scored a record 26 goals for Iceland in a 20-year international career.
Rank Name Career Goals Caps GPG
1 Eiður Guðjohnsen (list) 1996–2016 26 88 0.30
2 Kolbeinn Sigþórsson 2010– 22 44 0.50
3 Gylfi Þór Sigurðsson 2010– 18 55 0.33
4 Ríkharður Jónsson 1947–1965 17 33 0.52
5 Ríkharður Daðason 1991–2004 14 44 0.32
Arnór Guðjohnsen 1979–1997 14 73 0.19
7 Þórður Guðjónsson 1993–2004 13 58 0.22
8 Tryggvi Guðmundsson 1997–2008 12 42 0.29
Heiðar Helguson 1999–2011 12 55 0.22
10 Pétur Pétursson 1978–1990 11 41 0.27
Alfreð Finnbogason 2010– 11 45 0.24
Matthías Hallgrímsson 1968–1977 11 45 0.24
13 Helgi Sigurðsson 1993–2008 10 62 0.16
Eyjólfur Sverrisson 1990–2001 10 66 0.15
15 Þórður Þórðarson 1951–1958 9 16 0.56
Teitur Þórðarson 1972–1985 9 41 0.22
Birkir Bjarnason 2010– 9 65 0.14
18 Guðmundur Steinsson 1980–1988 8 19 0.42
Sigurður Grétarsson 1980–1992 8 46 0.17
Marteinn Geirsson 1971–1982 8 67 0.12
Atli Eðvaldsson 1976–1991 8 70 0.11

In bold players still playing or available for selection.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Courtney, Barrie (16 May 2008). "Faroe Islands – List of International Matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 3 November 2010. 
  2. ^ Nygård, Jostein (16 May 2008). "International matches of Iceland". RSSSF. Retrieved 3 November 2010. 
  3. ^ Nygård, Jostein (16 May 2008). "International matches of Iceland". RSSSF. Retrieved 16 October 2011. 
  4. ^ "Iceland become smallest nation ever to qualify for World Cup finals". The Guardian. 9 October 2017. Retrieved 10 October 2017. 
  5. ^ "Icelandic Premier League – Úrvalsdeild / Pepsi-deildin (Review)". Blog.fieldoo.com/. March 19, 2014. Retrieved June 28, 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c Ian King (Oct 21, 2013). "Northern Lights: The Sudden Ascent Of The Iceland National Football Team". Twohundredpercent.net. Retrieved June 28, 2016. 
  7. ^ "Iceland". beinsports.com. June 3, 2016. Retrieved June 28, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Iceland – Member associations". Uefa.org. 2016-05-20. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  9. ^ Allied Newspapers Ltd (2014-10-19). "An Icelandic summer". Timesofmalta.com. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  10. ^ "Iceland's father and son team". The Independent. 25 April 1996. Retrieved 10 October 2017. 
  11. ^ "BBC SPORT | Football | Euro 2004 | Euro 2004 Qualifying Group Five". BBC News. 2003-10-11. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  12. ^ "BBC SPORT | Football | Internationals | Germany reach Euro 2004". BBC News. 2003-10-11. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  13. ^ Nunns, Hector (1970-01-01). "BBC Sport – World Cup play-offs: How Iceland can set World Cup record". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-06-28. 
  14. ^ "Iceland 0–0 Croatia". BBC Sport. 2013-11-15. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  15. ^ "FIFA World Cup Play-Off: Croatia v Iceland". FourFourTwo.com. 2013-11-17. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  16. ^ "Croatia 2–0 Iceland". BBC Sport. 2013-11-19. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  17. ^ Motez Bishara (2016-06-06). "Euro 2016: Iceland's incredible rise to Europe's top - CNN.com". Edition.cnn.com. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  18. ^ Allied Newspapers Ltd. "An Icelandic summer". timesofmalta.com. Retrieved 2016-07-03. 
  19. ^ Gonzalez, Roger (2015-10-01). "FIFA rankings: Argentina No. 1, USA below Iceland, Mexico, Algeria". CBSSports.com. Retrieved 2016-07-03. 
  20. ^ "Iceland 2–1 Austria, Euro 2016: Rearguard action and late winner set up England tie for competition's smallest nation". Telegraph. Retrieved 27 June 2016. 
  21. ^ "England 1 Iceland 2, Euro 2016 – Humiliation as Joe Hart clanger sees Roy Hodgson's men crash out in Nice". Telegraph. Retrieved 27 June 2016. 
  22. ^ "France 5–2 Iceland: Euro 2016 quarter-final – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 July 2016. 
  23. ^ "Iceland become smallest nation ever to qualify for World Cup finals". The Guardian. 9 October 2017. Retrieved 10 October 2017. 
  24. ^ "Iceland Fixtures & Results". ESPN. Retrieved 3 March 2012. 
  25. ^ "2013 Iceland friendlies". KSÍ. Retrieved 15 January 2013. 
  26. ^ "2014 World Cup qualifying games". KSÍ. Retrieved 15 January 2013. 
  27. ^ "2014 Iceland friendlies". KSÍ. Retrieved 8 January 2014. 
  28. ^ "HM hópur Íslands: Albert, Frederik og Samúel valdir" (in Icelandic). Fotbolti.net. Retrieved 11 May 2018. 

External links[edit]