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Jelle Zijlstra

For other people named Zijlstra, see Zijlstra. Jelle Zijlstra was a Dutch politician of the defunct Anti-Revolutionary Party now merged into the Christian Democratic Appeal party and economist who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 22 November 1966 until 5 April 1967. Zijlstra applied at the Rotterdam School of Economics in June 1937 majoring in Economics. Zijlstra was conscripted in the Royal Netherlands Army and was mobilized as a lieutenant in August 1939. Zijlstra obtained an Bachelor of Economics degree in February 1940. On 10 May 1940 Nazi Germany invaded the Netherlands and the government fled to London to escape the German occupation. Zijlstra fought in the Battle of France. During the German occupation Zijlstra continued his study but in April 1943 the German occupation authority closed the Rotterdam School of Economics and Zijlstra went in to hiding. Following the end of World War II Zijlstra returned to the Rotterdam School of Economics before graduating with an Master of Economics degree on 29 November 1945.

Zijlstra worked as a researcher at the Rotterdam School of Economics from December 1945 until January 1947 and as an associate professor of Public economics at the Rotterdam School of Economics from 1 January 1947 until 8 July 1948 when got a doctorate as an Doctor of Philosophy in Public economics. Zijlstra worked as a professor of Public economics at the Free University Amsterdam from 28 October 1948 until 2 September 1952. After the election of 1952 Zijlstra was appointed as Minister of Economic Affairs in the Cabinet Drees II, taking office on 2 September 1952. After the Leader of the Anti-Revolutionary Party Jan Schouten announced his retirement from national politics and that he wouldn't not stand for the election of 1956 he approached Zijlstra as a candidate to succeed him, Zijlstra accepted and became the Leader of the Anti-Revolutionary Party and Lijsttrekker of the Anti-Revolutionary Party for the election on 23 April 1956; the Anti-Revolutionary Party made a small win, gaining 3 seats and now had 15 seats in the House of Representatives.

Zijlstra was elected as a Member of the House of Representatives and became the Parliamentary leader of the Anti-Revolutionary Party in the House of Representatives, taking office on 3 July 1956. On 3 October 1956 Zijlstra announced that he was stepping down as Leader of the Anti-Revolutionary Party and Parliamentary leader in favor of Sieuwert Bruins Slot. Following the cabinet formation of 1956 Zijlstra continued as Minister of Economic Affairs in the Cabinet Drees III, taking office on 13 October 1956; the Cabinet Drees III fell on 11 December 1958 and continued to serve in a demissionary capacity until it was replaced by the caretaker Cabinet Beel II with Zijlstra remaining as Minister of Economic Affairs and appointed as Minister of Finance dual serving in both positions, taking office on 22 December 1958. Shortly thereafter the Leader of the Anti-Revolutionary Party Bruins Slot approached Zijlstra to stand once again as Leader and Lijsttrekker of the Anti-Revolutionary Party for the election of 1959, Zijlstra accepted and again became the Leader and Lijsttrekker for the election on 29 December 1958.

The Anti-Revolutionary Party suffered a small loss, losing 1 seat and now had 14 seats in the House of Representatives. Zijlstra subsequently returned as a Member of the House of Representatives, taking office on 20 March 1959. Following the cabinet formation of 1959 Zijlstra remained as Minister of Finance in the Cabinet De Quay, taking office on 16 May 1959. On 26 May 1959 Zijlstra announced that he was stepping down as Leader once again in favor of Parliamentary leader Bruins Slot. In September 1962 Zijlstra announced that he wouldn't not stand for the election of 1963 but wanted run for the Senate. After the Senate election of 1963 Zijlstra was elected as a Member of the Senate, taking office on 25 June 1963 serving as a frontbencher. Following the cabinet formation of 1963 Zijlstra per his own request asked not to be considered for a cabinet post in the new cabinet, the Cabinet De Quay was replaced by the Cabinet Marijnen on 24 July 1963. Zijlstra returned as a distinguished professor of Public economics at the Free University Amsterdam serving from 1 January 1964 until 1 May 1967.

He worked as the director of the Abraham Kuyper Foundation from 1 August 1963 until 22 November 1966. Zijlstra became active in the private sector and public sector and occupied numerous seats as a corporate director and nonprofit director on several boards of directors and supervisory boards. On 16 September 1966 Zijlstra was nominated as the President of De Nederlandsche Bank. On 14 October 1966 Cabinet Cals continued to serve in a demissionary capacity. Following several failed cabinet formation attempts Zijlstra was approached by Vice-President of the Council of State and former Prime Minister Louis Beel of the Catholic People's Party as a compromise candidate for Prime Minister, Zijlstra accepted and was appointed as Formateur to form a new cabinet and his nomination as President of De Nederlandsche Bank was temporary suspended; the following cabinet formation of 1966 resulted in the continuation of the coalition agreement between the Catholic People's Party and the Anti-Revolutionary Party which formed the caretaker Cabinet Zijlstra with Zijlstra becoming Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Minister of General Affairs and Minister of Finance, taking office on 22 November 1966.

Shortly thereafter Zijlstra announced that he wouldn't stand for the election of 1967. Following the cabinet formation of 1967 Zijlstra per his own requ

Fisher Bank

The Fisher Bank is a sand bank in the North Sea, off the west coast of Denmark. It consists of Great Fisher Bank, Little Fisher Bank; some older charts refer to them as the "Great Fishing Bank" and the "Little Fishing Bank". As Fisher it gives its name to one of the sea areas in the British Shipping Forecast. Sea area Fisher is defined by the co-ordinates: 56°00'N 08°10'E 56°00'N 04°00'E 57°45'N 04°00'E 57°45'N 07°30'E 57°05'N 08°35'Eand the Danish coast; as its name suggests, these large sandbanks provide rich fishing grounds, but overfishing has left them less productive than they were, many Danish fishing vessels have moved elsewhere, into the North Sea or the Baltic. Dogger Bank for map and links to similar places

Jazz at Lincoln Center

Jazz at Lincoln Center is part of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City. The organization was founded in 1987 and opened in October 2004. Wynton Marsalis is the leader of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra; the Center hosts performances by visiting musicians. Many concerts are streamed live on the Center's YouTube channel; the Center presents educational programs in its home buildings, in schools throughout the country. In 1987, trumpeter Wynton Marsalis was involved in starting the Classical Jazz concert series, the first series of jazz concerts at Lincoln Center. In 1996, the Jazz at Lincoln Center organization became a constituent of Lincoln Center next to organizations such as the New York Philharmonic and the Metropolitan Opera; the budget for Jazz at Lincoln Center was $4 million in 1996, compared to $150 million for the Metropolitan Opera. In 2016, its budget was over $50 million. Wynton Marsalis has been artistic director since 1987. Greg Scholl became executive director in 2012.

Marsalis leads the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, which performs in the Appel Room and the Rose Theater in addition to extensive international tours. Concerts are broadcast live online. Educational programs are broadcast on the Center's YouTube channel. Since 2015, the Orchestra's albums have been issued on Blue Engine Records; the Center distributes jazz curriculums to high schools through its Essentially Ellington program. Professional musicians visit schools through the Let Freedom Swing program; the Center runs a Middle School Jazz Academy, a High School Jazz Academy, a Summer Academy, all in New York City, all of them with free tuition. Every year the Orchestra tours and visits schools throughout the U. S; the Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band Competition and Festival has supported high school jazz bands nationwide. The performing arts complex, Frederick P. Rose Hall, was designed by Rafael Viñoly and constructed by Turner-Santa Fe in a joint venture between Turner Construction and Santa Fe Construction.

Rose Hall consists of three venues: Rose Theater, The Appel Room, Dizzy's Club, named after trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. The Hall contains the Irene Diamond Education Center with rehearsal and recording rooms; the Nesuhi Ertegun Jazz Hall of Fame is named for co-founder of Atlantic Records. A 60-person international voting panel, which includes musicians and educators from 17 countries, is charged to nominate and select "the most definitive artists in the history of jazz for induction into the Hall of Fame". Inductees have included: Media related to Jazz at Lincoln Center at Wikimedia Commons Official website