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John Filson

John Filson was an American author, historian of Kentucky, pioneer and one of the founders of Cincinnati, Ohio. John Filson was born in Chester County, around 1747, he was the son of Davison Filson of Chester County. He attended the West Nottingham Academy in Colora and studied with the Reverend Samuel Finley, afterwards president of the College of New Jersey. Heitman's Historical Register of Colonial Officers reports a John Filson served as an Ensign in Montgomery's Pennsylvania Battalion of the Flying Camp and was taken prisoner at Fort Washington on 16 November 1776, during the Battle of New York, he worked as a schoolteacher and surveyor in Pennsylvania until 1782 or 1783, when he acquired over 13,000 acres of western lands and moved to Kentucky. He settled in Lexington, taught school, surveyed land claims, travelled the region interviewing the settlers and leading citizens, he wrote The Discovery and Present State of Kentucke during this period, travelled to Wilmington, Delaware, to have it published in the summer of 1784.

He had a "Map of Kentucke" engraved and printed in Philadelphia. The edition, including both book and map, consisted of 1,500 copies and was priced at $1.50. The map was reprinted several times before 1793. Filson's plan for a second edition, to be endorsed by George Washington, fell through; the book was immediately translated into French and re-published in Paris and somewhat a German edition appeared. The appendix relating the adventures of Daniel Boone was popular, was referenced by Lord Byron in Don Juan. Gilbert Imlay reprinted Filson's entire work, along with other material, in A Topographical Description of the Western Territory of North America, he left in manuscript A Diary of a Journey from Philadelphia to Vincennes, Indiana, in 1785. See Life and Writings of John Filson, by R. T. Durrett. After spending several years in Kentucky teaching school, trying to start a seminary, becoming embroiled in numerous lawsuits and financial difficulties, he purchased from Mathias Denman a one third interest in an 800-acre tract at the junction of the Ohio and Licking rivers, the future site of Cincinnati, which he called Losantiville, a name formed by Filson from the Latin "os", the Greek "anti", the French "ville", from its position opposite the mouth of the Licking River.

Filson's survey and plan of the town survives in the layout of modern downtown Cincinnati. In 1790, General Arthur St. Clair, Governor of the Northwest Territory, changed the name of Losantiville to Cincinnati in honor of the Society of the Cincinnati, an organization of Revolutionary War officers founded by George Washington. While on a surveying expedition near the Great Miami River, he disappeared, October 1, 1788, when the party was attacked by hostile Shawnees, his body was never found. After his disappearance his partners and Patterson, transferred his interest in the site of Cincinnati to Israel Ludlow, his heirs never reaped any benefit from the subsequent increase in the value of the land, he never left no direct descendants. The Filson Historical Society of Louisville, Kentucky is named for him. Reuben T. Durrett This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Wilson, J. G.. "Filson, John". Appletons' Cyclopædia of American Biography. 2. New York: D. Appleton.

P. 457. The Discovery and Present State of Kentucke Helderman, Leonard Clinton. "John Filson's Narrative of His Defeat on the Wabash, 1786". Filson Club History Quarterly. 12. Archived from the original on 2012-05-02. Retrieved 2011-11-29. Thruston, R. C. Ballard. "Filson's History and Map of Kentucky". Filson Club History Quarterly. 8. Archived from the original on 2012-04-25. Retrieved 2011-11-29. Wilson, Samuel M.. "John Filson in Pennsylvania". Filson Club History Quarterly. 13. Archived from the original on 2012-05-02. Retrieved 2011-11-30. Works by John Filson at Project Gutenberg Works by or about John Filson at Internet Archive

Yakut revolt

The Yakut revolt or the Yakut expedition was the last episode of the Russian Civil War. The hostilities took place between September 1921 and June 1923 and were centred on the Ayano-Maysky District of the Russian Far East. A formidable rising flared up in this part of Yakutia in September 1921. About 200 White Russians were led by Cornet Mikhail Korobeinikov. In March 1922 they established the Provisional Yakut Regional People's Government in Churapcha. On 23 March Korobeinikov's "Yakut People's Army," armed with six machine guns, took the major town of Yakutsk; the Red Army garrison was decimated. In April, the White Russians contacted the Provisional Priamurye Government in Vladivostok, asking for help. On 27 April, the Soviets sent an expedition to put down the uprising. In summer 1922, the Whites withdrew to the Pacific coast, they again asked Vladivostok for reinforcements. On 30 August, the Pacific Ocean Fleet, manned by about 750 volunteers under Lieutenant General Anatoly Pepelyayev, sailed from Vladivostok to assist the White Russians.

Three days this force disembarked in Ayan and moved upon Yakutsk. By the end of October, when Pepelyayev occupied the locality of Nelkan, he learned that the Bolsheviks had wrested Vladivostok from the White Army and the Civil War was over; when the Soviet Union was formed on 30 December 1922, the only Russian territory still controlled by the White Movement was the region of the Pepelyayevshchina, that is, Ayan and Nelkan. A unit of Bolsheviks under Ivan Strod was sent against Pepelyayev in February. On 12 February, they defeated the Pepelyayevists near Sasyl-Sasyg. On 24 April 1923 Indigirka sailed from Vladivostok for Ayan, they contained a contingent of the Red Army under Stepan Vostretsov. Upon his arrival in Ayan on 6 April, Vostretsov learnt; the remainder of the White Army were defeated near Ayan on 16 June. The general, 103 White officers, 230 soldiers were taken prisoner and transported to Vladivostok. Последние бои на Дальнем Востоке. М. Центрполиграф, 2005. Александр Петрушин. Омск, Аян, Лубянка...

Три жизни генерала Пепеляева. // «Родина», 1996 № 9. Клипель В. И. Аргонавты снегов. О неудавшемся походе генерала А. Пепеляева. Пепеляевщина. 6 сентября 1922 — 17 июня 1923 гг. Грачёв Г. П. Якутский поход генерала Пепеляева

Mr. Monk on Patrol

Mr. Monk on Patrol is the thirteenth novel written by Lee Goldberg to be based on the television series Monk, it was published on January 3, 2012. Like the other novels, the story is narrated by Monk's assistant; the town of Summit, New Jersey is hit with a string of arrests of high-profile politicians, leaving Randy Disher serving as the town's mayor. Since Summit's police are understaffed, the controversy brought forth more criminal activity, Disher's girlfriend flies to San Francisco to convince Adrian Monk and Natalie Teeger to help their friend Randy, by serving as temporary police officers for the town. While working as police officers and Natalie discover a body, Monk soon receives a threat on his own life, meant to scare him away. Adrian Monk keeps investigating, until he solves the murder. Weeks after the arrest, Captain Stottlemeyer asks Natalie and Monk whether they’re going to return to San Francisco. Monk makes a decision. Mr. Monk and the Open House is an excerpt from Mr. Monk on Patrol, published as a short story in the December 2011 issue of Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine before the release of the book.

Adrian Monk: the titular detective, played on the series by Tony Shalhoub Natalie Teeger: Monk's loyal assistant and the narrator of the book, played on the series by Traylor Howard Randy Disher: The acting mayor of Summit, New Jersey, played on the series by Jason Gray-Stanford Leland Stottlemeyer: Homicide Captain on the San Francisco Police force, played in the series by Ted Levine Sharona Fleming: Monk's former nurse and assistant, now Randy's live-in girlfriend, played in the series by Bitty Schram Amy Devlin: A lieutenant, Stottlemeyer's right hand in the San Francisco Police Department Ellen Morse: The owner of a shop selling items made with sanitized excrement. Despite her profession, Adrian develops a relationship with her based on her love of symmetry and sanitization

Freedom at 21

"Freedom at 21" is a song by American musician Jack White from his debut solo album Blunderbuss. Third Man Records distributed the single on April 1, 2012 by releasing 1000 helium balloons attached to flexi-disc copies of the track, it was released for digital download and as a 7-inch vinyl single on June 9 and June 11 with the B-side "Inaccessible Mystery". A music video directed by Hype Williams and starring Brittany Colombo was uploaded to White's YouTube channel on July 16, 2012. "Freedom at 21" peaked at 77 on Ultratop's Ultratip Bubbling Under charts in the Flanders region of Belgium, it reached Billboard's Alternative Songs and Hot Rock Songs charts, peaking at 22 and 35, respectively. It was nominated for Best Rock Song at the 55th Annual Grammy Awards. "Freedom at 21" was released as a single on April 1, 2012. To distribute the single, Third Man Records released 1000 helium balloons attached to flexi-disc copies of the song. In addition, the balloons were attached to postcards with directions on how to inform Third Man Records of the discovery.

The single was released via digital download on June 9 and as a 7-inch single on June 11 with the B-side "Inaccessible Mystery". "Freedom at 21" contains elements of hip hop music. Its "clattering drum pattern" was created by placing a tape echo on a drum beat played by Carla Azar. "Freedom at 21" was nominated for Best Rock Song at the 55th Annual Grammy Awards. The music video for "Freedom at 21" was directed by Hype Williams and stars Brittany Colombo as a police officer, it was filmed in June 2012 over a five-day period. Filming sessions for the desert scenes occurred in Lancaster and lasted between four and five hours per day; the remainder of the video was filmed at a studio in California. During production, police officers taught Colombo various maneuvers, such as placing handcuffs on a person. A stunt double was used for shots; the video was uploaded to White's YouTube channel on July 16, 2012. A "blue tint" is present in the video. In the video, White is stopped by a police officer while driving.

The video shows footage of White lip-synching to the song's lyrics in his cell interspersed with shots of a "scantily clad inmate". She "starts to grind on" White. White escapes his cell, resulting in a car chase in which he is stopped by a barricade created by a group of police officers and their cars. Queens Of The Stone Age frontman Josh Homme makes a cameo as one of the officers; as of August 2018, the music video for "Freedom at 21" has over 13 million views. Digital download and 7-inch vinyl"Freedom at 21" "Inaccessible Mystery" Adapted from "Freedom at 21" vinyl single liner notes. "Freedom at 21"Jack White – lead vocals, electric guitar solo, producer, mixing Olivia Jean – electric guitar Bryn Davies – upright bass Carla Azar – drums Vance Powell – recording, mixing Joshua V. Smith – assistant in recording and mixing Mindy Watts – assistant in recording and mixing"Inaccessible Mystery"Jack White – lead vocals, acoustic guitar, writer, producer Johnny Walker – electric guitar Jake Orral – amplified acoustic guitar Jack Lawrence – bass Daru Jones – drums Vance Powell – recording, mixing Joshua V. Smith – recording, assistant in mixing

Katharina Sunnerhagen

Katharina Stibrant Sunnerhagen is a physician and educator specialized in rehabilitation medicine. She is best known for her research in stroke rehabilitation, she is the Professor and Head of Rehabilitation Medicine Research Group at University of Gothenburg. Sunnerhagen graduated from the University of Gothenburg with a degree in medicine, she underwent specialist training in rehabilitation medicine. She was awarded a doctor of philosophy degree for her PhD thesis titled Regional Wall Motion in the Left Ventricle. Sunnerhagen was involved in drafting recommendations for stroke rehabilitation in Europe at World Stroke Congresses in 2010 and 2012, she is a member of scientific councils in stroke organizations including the Stroke Victims Association, the Handlaren Hjalmar Svenssons Foundation and the Greta and Einar Askers Foundation. She is a board member of the Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, Acta Neurologica and Rehabilitation Research & Practice. Presently, she is working as a consultant at Sahlgrenska University Hospital and as a guest professor at Sunnaas Rehbilitation Hospital, Norway.

She was elected as a member of the board of directors at the European Stroke Organization in 2016. She has published over 200 peer-reviewed original articles and several chapters in textbooks

John Donaldson (author)

John Donaldson known as Jon Inglis, was a British author and poet most associated in life with Oxford, England. Jon Inglis was born into poverty in Newcastle in 1920–21, was sent to an orphanage at the age of five when his mother who neglected the children in favour of living a life of a single women and alcohol dependent, could no longer cope with the children and his disabled sibling and abandoned them. At the Barnardo's orphanage, he experienced cold and abuse, he ran away to become the challenger in a mobile boxing booth, he joined the Pioneer Corps at outbreak of World War II and was captured by the Germans during the retreat to Dunkirk. Escaping many times only to be caught again and returned to solitary confinement where he began writing poetry, he novelised his early life under the title Forever Endeavour. After the war, he became a successful and respected wealthy businessman Suddenly and without warning the 1970s he turned his back on his children, his wife and left them destitute in order to become a full-time writer.

His wife, Hannalore had been working by day in order for him to write and typing all his plays and works by night in order to help him was heartbroken. He went to live in London with no possessions, spending nights on the streets or sleeping under bridges, speaking at Hyde Park's Speaker's Corner on the insubstantial nature of power and acquisition; this period was novelised as Season of the Butterfly, published after his death by his second wife. Aside from the novels, John Inglis wrote a large corpus of philosophical aphorisms, together with poems, plays, he was a recognised figure around Oxford in his latter years The majority of his great quantity of writings are held, though still unpublished, at the Oxfordshire Archives. On his death his substantial written works although promised by John to his only daughter of his abandoned children, were kept by his second wife. Members of his family are hoping that Oxfordshire Archives will hand them to their rightful beneficiary, his daughter, thus far his second wife has refused to give them to his daughter.

The last thing he said to his Daughter prior to his death, "Forgive me, I have nothing to give you but my work it is all I am and no greater love than this to give". He joined the Pioneer Corps at outbreak of World War II and was captured by the Germans during the retreat to Dunkirk, he novelised his early life under the title Forever Endeavour. After the war, he became a successful and respected businessman, but in the 1970s he left his home, his work and family to live in London with no possessions, spending nights on the streets or sleeping under bridges, speaking at Hyde Park's Speaker's Corner on the insubstantial nature of power and acquisition; this period was novelised as Season of the Butterfly, published after his death by his second wife. Aside from the novels, John Inglis wrote a large corpus of philosophical aphorisms, together with poems, plays, he was a recognised figure around Oxford in his latter years, the majority of his great quantity of writings are held, though still unpublished, at the Oxfordshire Archives.

The poet Kathleen Raine wrote to John's wife: "John Inglis was indeed a brave and remarkable man... There is real vision in his poems... I can understand what was in John's mind when he gave himself to seeking to bring about the only revolution that can change the world, A CHANGE OF HEART IN PEOPLE, ordinary people everywhere." Donaldson, B. Season of the Butterfly, Troy Publishing, Oxford, ISBN 0-9522435-0-4 OxfordPoet.com is a resource for his major works. The Oxfordshire County Archives, repository of his original papers