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Proterosuchidae

Proterosuchidae is an early paraphyletic, assemblage of basal archosauriformes whose fossils are known from the Latest Permian and the Early Triassic of Europe, Africa and South America. The name comes from Greek πρότερο- and σοῦχος, they were slender, medium-sized, long-snouted and superficially crocodile-like animals, although they lacked the armoured scutes of true crocodiles, their skeletal features are much more primitive. The limbs are short and indicate a sprawling posture, like contemporary lizards but unlike most archosaurs, their most characteristic feature is a distinct down-turning of the premaxilla. The terminal Permian catastrophe, which killed off 95% of all types of life, cleared the world of all large therapsids and allowed the proterosuchids to take center stage as the top carnivore. Within the space of five million years the proterosuchids had evolved into a wide variety of terrestrial and semi-aquatic carnivores; the proterosuchids represent the earliest adaptive radiation of the archosaurs.

They gave rise to the Erythrosuchidae some time in the Early Triassic. Recent studies consider Proterosuchidae to be at least a paraphyletic grouping, meaning that it does not form a true clade with a single common ancestor and proterosuchids as its only descendants. Instead, they are a chain of successively basal archosauriforms. Below is a cladogram from Ezcurra, that reexamined all historical members of the "Proterosuchia"; the placement of fragmentary taxa that had to be removed to increase tree resolution are indicated by dashed lines. Taxa that are nomina dubia are indicated by the note "dubium". Bold terminal taxa are collapsed. Ezcurra recovered a monophyletic Proterosuchidae containing only Archosaurus and the species of Proterosuchus, however some species are too fragmentary to resolve whether they fall into Proterosuchidae. Tasmaniosaurus, Sarmatosuchus and the "Long Reef proterosuchid" on the other hand were recovered confidently outside of Proterosuchidae. Benton, M. J. Vertebrate Paleontology, 2nd Ed..

Proterosuchidae Proterosuchidae - list of species

Ellie Campbell (author)

Ellie Campbell is a pseudonym for sisters, Pam Burks and Lorraine Campbell, who have co-authored and published five novels together, Lorraine Campbell living in Boulder and Pam Burks in Reigate, Surrey. They collaborate by email and telephone. Both sisters were born in Scotland and lived much of their early lives in Edinburgh, Bognor Regis and London, they wrote short stories independently for many years before deciding to become a writing team. They write women's fiction set in Britain, featuring humor and romance but their contemporary flawed characters and dramatic situations revolve around heroines who are older than the average chick lit novel, sometimes married with children or divorced single mothers and with a mystery or a murder element, they are classified as chick lit, satire or mystery categories. Their first book, How to Survive Your Sisters was published by Random House. In 2008, followed by a second, When Good Friends go Bad in 2009. In 2014 the sisters reverted the UK rights and republished both books independently with Across the Pond Press through Amazon.

Both novels are published in Italian and German by Mondadori in Italy, in Germany and translated in Serbia. With their third novel, "Looking For La La", - a funny chicklit mystery - Ellie Campbell decided to join the growing ranks of indie authors selling in ebook format as well as paperback through Amazon's KDP program. Looking For La La was followed by a sequel -"To Catch A Creeper: a Crouch End Confidential Mystery" and in April 2015, they published their fifth book with, "Million Dollar Question", their books appear high in the Amazon bestseller charts in the USA, UK and Australia. In 2014, How To Survive Your Sisters and Looking For La La were produced as audiobooks with Audible.com, narrated by Elizabeth Klett and Stevie Zimmerman respectively. They are a regular presence on social media with Facebook and Twitter Official Blog page Hardman and Swainson Literary Agency