Kent Wildlife Trust

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Pegwell Bay, which is part of Sandwich and Pegwell Bay nature reserve, may have been the site of Julius Caesar's landing in Britain in 54 BC.[1]

Kent is a county in the south-eastern corner of England. It is bounded to the north by Greater London and the Thames Estuary, to the west by Sussex and Surrey, and to the south and east by the English channel and the North Sea. The county town is Maidstone,[2] it is governed by Kent County Council, with twelve district councils, Ashford, Canterbury, Dartford, Dover, Folkestone and Hythe, Gravesham, Maidstone, Thanet, Tonbridge and Malling and Tunbridge Wells. Medway is a separate unitary authority.[3][4] The chalk hills of the North Downs run from east to west through the county, with the wooded Weald to the south, the coastline is alternately flat and cliff-lined.[2]

Kent Wildlife Trust (KWT) was founded in 1958, and it describes itself as "the leading conservation organisation covering the whole of Kent and Medway, dedicated to protecting wildlife and wild habitats for everyone to enjoy".[5] In 2016 it had 31,130 members and an annual income of £4 million.[6] KWT manages fifty-four nature reserves, and twenty-three are Sites of Special Scientific Interest, two are National Nature Reserves, nine are Nature Conservation Review sites, seven are Special Areas of Conservation, three are Special Protection Areas. seven are Local Nature Reserves, one is a Geological Conservation Review site, twelve are in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and one is a Scheduled Monument.

Nature reserves[edit]

Key[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap · Google Maps
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Sites[edit]

Site Photograph Area[a] Location[a] Public access Classifications Description
Ashford Warren and Hoads Wood[7] Ashford Warren 34.5 hectares
(85 acres)
Ashford
51°09′36″N 0°51′43″E / 51.160°N 0.862°E / 51.160; 0.862 (Ashford Warren & Hoads Wood)
TR002439
YES This site has acid grassland, which is nationally rare, and mature woodland. There are also pools which have water violets, great crested newts and grass snakes.[7]
Bigbury Camp[8] Bigbury Camp Not
available
Canterbury
51°16′44″N 1°02′02″E / 51.279°N 1.034°E / 51.279; 1.034 (Bigbury Camp)
TR117577
YES SM[9] This Iron Age hillfort may have been the site of a battle when Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 BC. It is now part of Howfield Wood.[8]
Bough Beech[10] Bigbury Camp 42 hectares
(100 acres)
Sevenoaks
51°13′30″N 0°08′28″E / 51.225°N 0.141°E / 51.225; 0.141 (Bough Beech)
TQ495494
YES AONB[10] This nature reserve covers the northern end of Bough Beech reservoir, and there is a hide for viewing the many species of birds. The shores have great crested newts, toads and dragonflies.[10]
Blue Bell Hill[11] Blue Bell Hill 5 hectares
(12 acres)
Chatham
51°19′52″N 0°30′04″E / 51.331°N 0.501°E / 51.331; 0.501 (Blue Bell Hill)
TQ743621
YES AONB,[11] NCR,[12] SSSI[13] This hill has typical chalk grassland flora such as salad burnet, bird's foot trefoil and fairy flax. Butterflies include the chalk hill blue and brown argus.[11]
Brenchley Wood[14] Brenchley Wood 15 hectares
(37 acres)
Tonbridge
51°09′14″N 0°21′18″E / 51.154°N 0.355°E / 51.154; 0.355 (Brenchley Wood)
TQ648420
YES This ancient wood is dominated by mature beech and oak trees, with birds such as nightingales and tawny owls. A former pine plantation in the north of the site is now being restored to heathland.[14]
Broadham Down[15] Broadham Down 16 hectares
(40 acres)
Canterbury
51°14′42″N 0°59′10″E / 51.245°N 0.986°E / 51.245; 0.986 (Broadham Down)
TR085538
YES This nature reserve has views over the Stour Valley. Three species of bat hibernate on the site, which has chalk grassland, woodland and scrub. Flowering plants include fragrant and common spotted orchids.[15]
Burham Down[16] Burham Down 110 hectares
(270 acres)
Rochester
51°20′02″N 0°29′20″E / 51.334°N 0.489°E / 51.334; 0.489 (Burham Down)
TQ735624
PP AONB,[17] NCR,[18] SAC,[19] SSSI[20] This site has woodland, chalk grassland, and two chalk pits which provide shelter for birds in the winter and breeding sites in the summer. Woodland flora include orchids.[16]
Burham Marsh[21] Burham Marsh 36 hectares
(89 acres)
Rochester
51°19′37″N 0°27′32″E / 51.327°N 0.459°E / 51.327; 0.459 (Burham Marsh)
TQ714615
FP SSSI[22] These tidal reedbeds on the River Medway provide a habitat for waterfowl and waders such as kingfishers, wigeons, water rails and grey herons. [21]
Collingwood[23] Collingwood 3 hectares
(7.4 acres)
Cranbrook
51°02′06″N 0°30′32″E / 51.035°N 0.509°E / 51.035; 0.509 (Collingwood)
TQ760292
YES This reserve is woodland which has many exotic species as well as native trees. It is centred on a lake which has birds such as mallards, kingfishers and moorhens.[23]
Conningbrook Lakes Country Park[24] Conningbrook Lakes Country Park 34 hectares
(84 acres)
Ashford
51°09′22″N 0°53′56″E / 51.156°N 0.899°E / 51.156; 0.899 (Conningbrook Lakes Country Park)
TR028436
YES There are three lakes in these former gravel pits, and other habitats are ponds, a river, grassland and wet woodland. In the winter there are migratory wildfowl and wetland birds such as wigeon, tufted duck and gadwall.[24]
Cowden Pound Pastures[25] Cowden Pound Pastures 6 hectares
(15 acres)
Edenbridge
51°10′12″N 0°05′10″E / 51.170°N 0.086°E / 51.170; 0.086 (Cowden Pound Pastures)
TQ459433
NO SSSI[26] This is unimproved neutral grassland, which is a nationally rare habitat, and it is grazed to prevent scrub invading the pasture. Grasses include crested dog's tail and common knapweed, and an area of wet grassland by a stream has jonted rush and water mint.[27]
Cromers Wood[28] Cromers Wood 28 hectares
(69 acres)
Sittingbourne
51°18′40″N 0°43′59″E / 51.311°N 0.733°E / 51.311; 0.733 (Cromers Wood)
TQ906604
YES This ancient semi-natural wood is located on the south-east slope of a dry valley. There are birds such as sparrowhawks, green woodpeckers and great spotted woodpeckers, and flora include early purple and common spotted orchids.[28]
Darland Banks[29] Darland Banks 45 hectares
(110 acres)
Gillingham
51°21′32″N 0°34′19″E / 51.359°N 0.572°E / 51.359; 0.572 (Darland Banks)
TQ792654
YES LNR[30] This area of grassland, scrub and woodland has diverse fauna and flora, including the largest population of man orchids in Britain. There are birds such as willow warbler, yellowhammer, linnet and lesser whitethroat.[29][30]
Downe Bank[31] Downe Bank 5 hectares
(12 acres)
Orpington
51°19′44″N 0°03′47″E / 51.329°N 0.063°E / 51.329; 0.063 (Downe Bank)
TQ438609
YES SSSI[32] Charles Darwin, who lived locally, carried out scientific research on the site, and it was the first to be purchased by the KWT in 1962. It is mainly chalk grassland and fauna include hazel dormice and green hairstreak and brown argus butterflies.[31]
East Blean Wood[33] East Blean Wood 122 hectares
(300 acres)
Canterbury
51°20′06″N 1°08′53″E / 51.335°N 1.148°E / 51.335; 1.148 (East Blean Wood)
TR194642
YES NCR,[34] NNR[35][36] SAC[37] SSSI[34] This site has mixed coppice with some mature oaks. Insects include the rare and protected heath fritillary butterfly, and there is a wide variety of woodland birds.[38]
Fackenden Down[39] Fackenden Down 14 hectares
(35 acres)
Sevenoaks
51°19′23″N 0°11′46″E / 51.323°N 0.196°E / 51.323; 0.196 (Fackenden Down)
TQ531605
YES AONB,[40] SSSI[40] This site is mainly chalk grassland, with some woodland and scrub. There are a variety of orchids, and butterflies such as the brown argus, common blue and dark green fritillary.[39]
The Gill[41] The Gill 12 hectares
(30 acres)
Cranbrook
51°07′12″N 0°28′05″E / 51.120°N 0.468°E / 51.120; 0.468 (The Gill)
TQ728385
NO This site has been planted with sweet chestnut, which dominates most of it. Flora includes bluebells, early purple orchids and marsh-marigold.[41]
Ham Fen[42] Ham Fen 30 hectares
(74 acres)
Deal
51°14′56″N 1°20′10″E / 51.249°N 1.336°E / 51.249; 1.336 (Ham Fen)
TR329553
NO This old fenland site has wet grassland with deep mires, dykes and ditches. Fauna include beavers.[42]
Hewitt's Chalk Bank[43] Hewitt's Chalk Bank 4 hectares
(9.9 acres)
Sevenoaks
51°20′46″N 0°07′26″E / 51.346°N 0.124°E / 51.346; 0.124 (Hewitt's Chalk Bank)
TQ480629
NO This former refuse tip has a large mound which is the soil from the excavation of a railway tunnel. Habitats are grassland and scrub, and unusual flora include grass vetchling and dark mullein.[43]
Holborough Marshes[44] Holborough Marshes 35 hectares
(86 acres)
Snodland
51°20′13″N 0°26′56″E / 51.337°N 0.449°E / 51.337; 0.449 (Holborough Marshes)
TQ707626
YES SSSI[45]

The marshes have a variety of wetland habitats, freshwater marshes, woodland, reedbeds, which are brackish and tidal, wet grassland, scrub, and freshwater and saline dykes. There are water voles, and birds include reed buntings and sedge warblers.[44]

Hothfield Heathlands[46] Hothfield Heathlands 86 hectares
(210 acres)
Ashford
51°10′37″N 0°49′12″E / 51.177°N 0.820°E / 51.177; 0.820 (Hothfield Heathlands)
TQ972458
YES LNR,[47] SSSI[48] This site has areas of heath and the best valley bog in the county, both habitats which are uncommon in Kent. Over a thousand insect species have been recorded, several of which are nationally rare, such as the bee Lasioglossum semilucens and the cranefly Tipula holoptera.[49]
Ivy Hatch[50] Ivy Hatch 0.5 hectares
(1.2 acres)
Sevenoaks
51°16′08″N 0°16′26″E / 51.269°N 0.274°E / 51.269; 0.274 (Ivy Hatch)
TQ587547
YES Several streams run through this small site, and there are many wetland plants, including sphagnum moss. There are many common spotted orchids, and trees such as alders and hazels.[50]
Kemsing Down[51] Kemsing Down 16 hectares
(40 acres)
Sevenoaks
51°18′47″N 0°13′23″E / 51.313°N 0.223°E / 51.313; 0.223 (Kemsing Down)
TQ550594
YES AONB[52] Habitats in this downland site include ancient and secondary woodland, scrub and chalk grassland. There are man, pyramidal and common spotted orchids, and butterflies include the brown argus and grizzled skipper.[51]
Kiln Wood[53] Kiln Wood 6 hectares
(15 acres)
Maidstone
51°13′55″N 0°42′00″E / 51.232°N 0.700°E / 51.232; 0.700 (Kiln Wood)
TQ886515
YES This wood is mainly oak, hornbeam and hazel, and it is managed by coppicing. A stream at the northern end has lady fern, herb paris and broad buckler-fern.[53]
The Larches[54] The Larches 25 hectares
(62 acres)
Maidstone
51°17′56″N 0°33′43″E / 51.299°N 0.562°E / 51.299; 0.562 (The Larches)
TQ787587
YES AONB,[13] NCR,[55] SAC[56], SSSI[13]

This site has chalk grassland, woods and scrub. Grassland flora include autumn gentian, pyramidal orchid and broad-leaved helleborine, and there are butterflies such as the chalkhill blue and marbled white.[54]

Longfield Chalk Bank[57] Longfield Chalk Bank 2 hectares
(4.9 acres)
Longfield
51°24′00″N 0°17′46″E / 51.400°N 0.296°E / 51.400; 0.296 (Longfield Chalk Bank)
TQ598693
YES This chalk grassland site also has areas of woodland and scrub. Fauna include the common blue butterfly, slow worm, common lizard and willow warbler.[57]
Lydden Temple Ewell[58] File:Lydden and Temple Ewell Downs 90 hectares
(220 acres)
Dover
51°09′43″N 1°15′18″E / 51.162°N 1.255°E / 51.162; 1.255 (Lydden Temple Ewell)
TR277453
YES NCR,[59] NNR[36][60] SAC,[61] SSSI[62] This site has some of the richest chalk downland in the county. The invertebrate community is outstanding, including butterflies such as marbled whites, adonis blue and the very rare silver-spotted skipper.[63]
Marden Meadow[64] Marden Meadow 5.6 hectares
(14 acres)
Tonbridge
51°10′23″N 0°31′16″E / 51.173°N 0.521°E / 51.173; 0.521 (Marden Meadow)
TQ763445
YES SSSI[65] These unimproved neutral meadows are cut for hay each year and then grazed. There are also ponds and hedgerows which are probably of ancient origin, and trees include midland hawthorns and wild service-trees.[66]
Nashenden Down[67] Nashenden Down 55 hectares
(140 acres)
Rochester
51°21′50″N 0°29′02″E / 51.364°N 0.484°E / 51.364; 0.484 (Nashenden Down)
TQ730657
YES AONB[67] This nature reserve was created from a large arable field in 2009, and it is being regenerated with chalk grassland species, partly by colonisation from a steep bank which escaped ploughing and partly by seed spreading. An area of scrub provides a habitat for birds.[67]
Nemo Down[68] Nemo Down 21 hectares
(52 acres)
Dover
51°07′48″N 1°16′34″E / 51.130°N 1.276°E / 51.130; 1.276 (Nemo Down)
TR293419
YES This site has chalk grassland, scrub and woodland. There is a diverse range of plants including pyramidal orchids and wood anemones, and butterflies such as the marbled white and wall brown.[68]
Oare Marshes[69] Oare Marshes 81 hectares
(200 acres)
Faversham
51°20′46″N 0°53′20″E / 51.346°N 0.889°E / 51.346; 0.889 (Oare Marshes)
TR013647
FP LNR,[70] NCR[71] Ramsar,[72] SPA[73] SSSI[74] This site has salt marshes, fresh water dykes and reed beds. It is of international importance for migratory, overwintering and breeding wetland birds, such as avocets, marsh harriers and shovelers.[69]
Old Park Hill[75] Old Park Hill 40 hectares
(99 acres)
Dover
51°08′49″N 1°16′44″E / 51.147°N 1.279°E / 51.147; 1.279 (Old Park Hill)
TR294438
YES AONB[75] This steeply sloping hill has woodland, scrub and grassland. The site has not been managed since around 2005, and KWT is removing scrub to restore its mainly grassland habitat, providing an increased area suitable for meadow butterflies, reptiles and orchids.[75]
Park Gate Down[76] Park Gate Down 7 hectares
(17 acres)
Canterbury
51°10′08″N 1°00′36″E / 51.169°N 1.010°E / 51.169; 1.010 (Park Gate Down)
TR168457
YES SAC,[77] SSSI[78] This downland site has grassland which is grazed by sheep and cattle on the lower slopes and dense scrub on the upper ones. There are a variety of orchids including the uncommon lady and musk orchids.[79]
Parsonage Wood[80] Parsonage Wood 9 hectares
(22 acres)
Cranbrook
51°04′01″N 0°33′47″E / 51.067°N 0.563°E / 51.067; 0.563 (Parsonage Wood)
TQ797329
YES SSSI[81] This is an example of a woodland ghyll in the High Weald. The trees are mainly coppiced, but some of the ground flora are species which are indicative of ancient woods, such as butcher's broom, violet helleborine and pendulous sedge.[82]
Polhill Bank[83] Polhill Bank 4 hectares
(9.9 acres)
Sevenoaks
51°19′26″N 0°09′58″E / 51.324°N 0.166°E / 51.324; 0.166 (Polhill Bank)
TQ510605
YES AONB[83] This chalk grassland site is on a south-east slope. There is also an area of scrub, which provides a habitat for birds such as blackcap and willow warbler. Flora include rock-rose.[83]
Quarry Wood[84] Quarry Wood 26 hectares
(64 acres)
Maidstone
51°14′20″N 0°27′54″E / 51.239°N 0.465°E / 51.239; 0.465 (Quarry Wood)
TQ722518
YES The wood is mainly sweet chestnut coopice, but at the northern end there are mature oak and beech trees. A small stream runs along the bottom of the valley.[84]
Queendown Warren[85] Queendown Warren 76 hectares
(190 acres)
Sittingbourne
51°20′02″N 0°37′16″E / 51.334°N 0.621°E / 51.334; 0.621 (Queendown Warren)
TQ827629
YES AONB,[85] LNR,[86] NCR,[87] SAC,[88][89] SSSI[90] This site has dry grassland and woodland on a south facing slope. It has two rare plants, early spider orchid and meadow clary, and a rich variety of insects.[91]
Romney Marsh[92] Romney Marsh 11 hectares
(27 acres)
New Romney
50°59′49″N 0°57′36″E / 50.997°N 0.960°E / 50.997; 0.960 (Romney Marsh)
TR078261
YES LNR,[93] Ramsar,[94] SSSI[95] This site is formed from ancient sand dunes which have been left behind as the sea has retreated over the last two thousand years, and it has plants such as sea spurrey. There are also ponds left by gravel extraction, some permanent and others which dry out in the summer.[96]
Ruxley Gravel Pits[97] Ruxley Gravel Pits 11 hectares
(27 acres)
Orpington
51°24′36″N 0°07′05″E / 51.410°N 0.118°E / 51.410; 0.118 (Ruxley Gravel Pits)
TQ474700
NO SSSI[98] There are four water filled pits with areas of fen. Over 500 plants species have been recorded and 169 birds, out of which 53 are breeding species. There are also 23 butterfly species, 23 dragonfly and over 500 beetles. Water quality is high.[98]
Sandwich and Pegwell Bay[99] Pegwell Bay 615 hectares
(1,520 acres)
Ramsgate
51°19′12″N 1°21′29″E / 51.320°N 1.358°E / 51.320; 1.358 (Sandwich and Pegwell Bay)
TR341632
YES GCR,[100][101] LNR,[102] NCR,[103] NNR,[36][104] Ramsar,[105] SAC,[106][107] SPA,[108] SSSI[109] This site has the only ancient dune pasture in the county, and other habitats include inter-tidal mudflats, saltmarshes, shingle beaches, sand dunes and chalk cliffs. It is internationally important for its bird life.[99]
Sevenoaks Wildlife Reserve[110] Sevenoaks Wildlife Reserve 73 hectares
(180 acres)
Sevenoaks
51°17′13″N 0°10′41″E / 51.287°N 0.178°E / 51.287; 0.178 (Sevenoaks Wildlife Reserve)
TQ520565
PP SSSI[111] This site has flooded gravel pits which have a variety of breeding and wintering birds. There are thirteen species of dragonfly, and there are also areas of reedbeds and woodland.[112]
Sladden Wood[113] Sladden Wood 7 hectares
(17 acres)
Dover
51°08′24″N 1°13′30″E / 51.140°N 1.225°E / 51.140; 1.225 (Sladden Wood)
TR257428
YES The main trees in this wood are hornbeam, field maple and hazel, and there are ground flora such as green hellebore and yellow archangel.[113]
South Blean[114] South Blean 329 hectares
(810 acres)
Canterbury
51°16′30″N 0°59′56″E / 51.275°N 0.999°E / 51.275; 0.999 (South Blean)
TR093571
YES This site has native woodland, conifer plantations, heath and bog. KWT is gradually removing the conifers to allow natural regeneration, and it also manages the site by grazing and coppicing. Birds include nightjars and nightingales.[114]
South Swale[115] South Swale 420 hectares
(1,000 acres)
Whitstable
51°20′42″N 0°57′25″E / 51.345°N 0.957°E / 51.345; 0.957 (South Swale)
TR060648
YES LNR,[116] Ramsar,[72] SPA,[73] SSSI[74] This coastal site has wetland and grassland, with mudflats which attract a large population of waders and wildfowl in winter. Flora include Yellow horned-popies, sea-lavender, golden samphires and wild carrots.[115]
Spong Wood[117] Spong Wood 18 hectares
(44 acres)
Ashford
51°10′08″N 1°02′02″E / 51.169°N 1.034°E / 51.169; 1.034 (Spong Wood)
TR122455
YES Common trees in this coppiced wood include sweet chestnut, oak, hornbeam and hazel. Orchids can be found on the high slopes and ramsons lower down.[117]
Spuckles and Kennelling Woods[118] Spuckles Wood 20 hectares
(49 acres)
Faversham
51°14′17″N 0°48′07″E / 51.238°N 0.802°E / 51.238; 0.802 (Spuckles and Kennelling Woods)
TQ957525
YES AONB[118] These ancient woods on the steep escarpment of the Kent Downs have diverse trees including mature oaks and beeches. Flora include greater butterfly and lady orchids.[118]
Stockbury Hill Wood[119] Stockbury Hill Wood 5 hectares
(12 acres)
Sittingbourne
51°19′01″N 0°37′59″E / 51.317°N 0.633°E / 51.317; 0.633 (Stockbury Hill Wood)
TQ836608
NO This wood is mainly yew, hornbeam and oak. It has a variety of orchids, such as bird's-nest, lady and fly. There are orange tip and holly blue butterflies.[119]
Stone Wood[120] Stone Wood Not
available
Ashford
51°05′56″N 0°48′11″E / 51.099°N 0.803°E / 51.099; 0.803 (Stone Wood)
TQ964370
YES This site was clear felled in 1992 and left to regenerate naturally. The KWT acquired it in 2002 and is encouraging native plants and animals to occupy it.[120]
Turners Field[121] Turners Field 11 hectares
(27 acres)
Tenterden
51°04′26″N 0°41′06″E / 51.074°N 0.685°E / 51.074; 0.685 (Turners Field)
TQ882340
YES This field is managed as part of an organic farm, and has grassland, a stream, a pond, scrub and mature woodland. Herbs include pepper saxifrage, black knapweed and bird's-foot trefoil.[121]
Tyland Barn[122] Tyland Barn Not
available
Maidstone
51°18′22″N 0°30′54″E / 51.306°N 0.515°E / 51.306; 0.515 (Tyland Barn)
TQ754593
YES This is the headquarters of the KWT. It has a nature park which is designed to show the variety of habitats in the county, such as a pond, grassland, a chalk bank, a shingle beach, scrub and hedges.[122]
Wattle Wood[123] Wattle Wood 1 hectare
(2.5 acres)
Tenterden
51°05′13″N 0°40′23″E / 51.087°N 0.673°E / 51.087; 0.673 (Wattle Wood)
TQ873354
YES This ancient coppice with standards wood has diverse flora and fauna. There are many early purple orchids, and mammals such as dormice.[123]
West Blean and Thornden Woods[124] Thornden Wood 490 hectares
(1,200 acres)
Herne Bay
51°19′41″N 1°04′30″E / 51.328°N 1.075°E / 51.328; 1.075 (West Blean and Thornden Woods)
TR143633
YES NCR,[125] SSSI[125] These woods have more than fifty species of breeding birds, and the diverse invertebrate fauna include five nationally rare and thirteen nationally scarce species. There is also a population of the declining and protected hazel dormouse.[126]
Westfield Wood[127] Westfield Wood 5 hectares
(12 acres)
Aylesford
51°19′05″N 0°31′01″E / 51.318°N 0.517°E / 51.318; 0.517 (Westfield Wood)
TQ755607
YES AONB,[127] NCR,[128]SAC,[129] SSSI[13] This is described by the KWT as an "internationally important yew woodland" on steep chalk slopes. There is also an area of hazel and ash coppice, with ground flora such as butcher's broom and green hellebore.[127]
Yockletts Bank[130] Yockletts Bank 23 hectares
(57 acres)
Canterbury
51°11′20″N 1°02′13″E / 51.189°N 1.037°E / 51.189; 1.037 (Yockletts Bank)
TR123477
YES AONB,[130] SSSI[131] This sloping site has woodland on dry chalk soils. There are diverse woodland breeding birds, and the ground flora is dominated by bluebells, but there are also many orchids.[132]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The area and location are taken from the Wildlife Trust page for each site.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sample, Ian (29 November 2017). "Caesar's invasion of Britain began from Pegwell Bay in Kent, say archaeologists". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 29 November 2017. Retrieved 29 November 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Kent". Encyclopedia Britannica. Archived from the original on 22 April 2018. Retrieved 15 May 2018. 
  3. ^ "District councils". Kent County Council. Archived from the original on 27 October 2017. Retrieved 15 May 2018. 
  4. ^ "Council and democracy". Kent County Council. Archived from the original on 6 February 2007. Retrieved 19 April 2007. 
  5. ^ "About us". Kent Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 14 November 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2018. 
  6. ^ "2016 Annual Review" (PDF). Kent Wildlife Trust. Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 January 2018. Retrieved 24 May 2018. 
  7. ^ a b "Ashford Warren & Hoads Wood". Kent Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 16 July 2018. 
  8. ^ a b "Bigbury Camp". Kent Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 16 July 2018. 
  9. ^ "Bigberry Camp: List Entry 1005169". Historic England. Archived from the original on 26 January 2018. Retrieved 25 January 2018. 
  10. ^ a b c "Bough Beech". Kent Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  11. ^ a b c "Blue Bell Hill". Kent Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 16 July 2018. 
  12. ^ Ratcliffe, p. 118
  13. ^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Wouldham to Detling Escarpment". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  14. ^ a b "Brenchley Wood". Kent Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 16 July 2018. 
  15. ^ a b "Broadham Down". Kent Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 16 July 2018. 
  16. ^ a b "Burham Down". Kent Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 16 July 2018. 
  17. ^ "Wouldham to Detling Escarpment citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 January 2018. Retrieved 3 March 2018. 
  18. ^ Ratcliffe, p. 47
  19. ^ "Designated Sites View: North Downs Woodlands". Special Area of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 16 January 2018. 
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Sources[edit]

  • Ratcliffe, Derek, ed. (1977). A Nature Conservation Review. 2. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-21403-3. 

External links[edit]