Kentucky School for the Blind

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Kentucky School for the Blind, 1934

The Kentucky School for the Blind is an educational facility for blind and visually impaired students from Kentucky who are aged up to 21.

Bryce McLellan Patten founded the Kentucky Institution for the Education of the Blind in 1839 in Louisville, Kentucky. In 1842, it was chartered as the Kentucky Institution for the Blind by the state legislature as the third state-supported school for the blind established in the United States; in 1855, it moved to its present location on Frankfort Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood.[1] About this time, it was renamed the Kentucky School for the Blind.[2] Today, it continues its mission of teaching the blind and visually impaired students.[3][4][5][6][7] The institution has inspired people to build other organizations to benefit those who are visually impaired.[8][9]

The school is a member of Council of Schools for the Blind (COSB).

In the News[edit]

An ex-principal of the school has accused the Kentucky Board of Education of gender discrimination.[10]

The facility receives no basic school funding from the state government, and instead must "rely on money from the state’s general fund."[11][12][13]

A previous student of the facility was recently nominated for a Grammy.[14][15][16][17] Another previous student became a notable advocate for others with visual impairments.[18]

A book has been published noting the experiences of the students and faculty of the institution.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ellis, Laura (2017-08-11). "Curious Louisville: Does Louisville Have The Highest Blind Population In The U.S.?". 89.3 WFPL News Louisville. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  2. ^ "Filak, Luke to Receive UC College of Medicine's Highest Honor May 19". www.uc.edu. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  3. ^ "Complaints turn to praise at Kentucky School for the Blind". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  4. ^ "Grissom Award goes to Fayette County educator". www.lanereport.com. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  5. ^ "Rachel and Terry visit the Kentucky School for the Blind". WHAS11. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  6. ^ "Blind students 'touch' the eclipse with help of technology". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  7. ^ "Complaints turn to praise at Kentucky School for the Blind". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  8. ^ News, KATHERINE GRANDSTRAND Aberdeen American. "Aberdeen college to build new school for the blind". Rapid City Journal Media Group. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  9. ^ "American Printing House for the Blind fulfills its mission to serve - Insider Louisville". Insider Louisville. 2018-01-14. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  10. ^ Wheatley, Kevin. "Ex-principal at Ky. School for the Blind accuses Ky. Department of Education of gender discrimination". Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  11. ^ "Ground broken for new elementary school at the KSD". www.lanereport.com. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  12. ^ "Education board gave Stephen Pruitt a glowing evaluation. Four months later, it ousted him". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  13. ^ Independent, MIKE JAMES The. "Superintendent: Bevin's education budget proposals "devastating"". The Independent Online. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  14. ^ Stevens, Ashlie (2017-07-27). "How Country Music's Roots Trace Back To Kentucky School For The Blind". 89.3 WFPL News Louisville. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  15. ^ "S. Indiana bluegrass star nominated for first GRAMMY". WHAS11. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  16. ^ "Blind Grammy nominated fiddler is a Hoosier native". 13 WTHR Indianapolis. 2017-12-10. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  17. ^ "Southern Indiana fiddler nominated for 'Best Bluegrass Album' Grammy". Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  18. ^ Independent, Emily Porter | The Daily. "Blind lawyer advocates for visually impaired". The Independent Online. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 
  19. ^ "How the Louisville Story Program helped one new writer come full circle - Insider Louisville". Insider Louisville. 2018-03-15. Retrieved 2018-05-10. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°15′26″N 85°42′49″W / 38.25722°N 85.71361°W / 38.25722; -85.71361