Kingdom of Luang Phrabang

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Kingdom of Luang Phrabang
1707–1945
1945–1949
Flag of Luang Phrabang
Flag
Location of Luang Phrabang
StatusFrench Protectorate
(1893–1945, 1945–1949)
CapitalLuang Phrabang
Common languagesLao
Religion Buddhism
GovernmentMonarchy
History 
• Lan Xang divided
1707
• Kingdom of Laos formed
1949
Currencypiastre (from 1893)
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Lan Xang
Kingdom of Laos
Today part of Laos
 Thailand
 Vietnam
 China

The Kingdom of Luang Phrabang was formed in 1707 as a result of the split of the Kingdom of Lan Xang. When The kingdom split, Muang Phuan became a tributary state of Luang Prabang. Then as the years passed, the monarchy weakened even more, that it was forced to pay tribute at various times to the Burmese and the Siamese. After a particularly destructive attack by the Black Flag Army in 1887, the kingdom chose to accept French protection.

Kings of Luang Phrabang[edit]

  • Kitsarat (1707–1713)
  • Ong Kham (1713–1723)
  • Thao Ang (Inthason) (1723–1749)
  • Intharavongsa (1749)
  • Inthaphom (1749)
  • Sotika-Kuomane (1749–1768) (Burmese vassal, 1765–1768)[1]
  • Surinyavong II (1768–1788) (Burmese vassal, 1768–1778)[2]
  • Siamese occupation (1791–1792)[2]
  • Anurutha (3 February 1792 – 179..) (1st reign)
  • Siamese occupation (179.. – 2 June 1794)
  • Anurutha (2 June 1794 – 31 December 1819) (2nd reign)
  • Manthaturath (31 December 1819 – 7 March 1837) (Regent for Anurutha from 1817 until 31 December 1819; lives as a monk in Bangkok from 1825 until 1826, leaving Luang Phra Bang to be administered by Thai officials)
  • Unkeo (1837–1838) (Regent)
  • Sukha-Söm (1838 – 23 September 1850)
  • Chantharath (23 September 1850 – 1 October 1868)
  • Oun Kham (1 October 1868 – 15 December 1895) (Zakarine was regent for Oun Kham from April 1888 until 15 December 1895)
  • Zakarine (15 December 1895 – 25 March 1904)
  • Sisavang Vong (26 March 1904 – 27 August 1946)

From 12 October 1945 Sisavang Vong was officially King of Laos.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thant Myint-U (2006). The River of Lost Footsteps--Histories of Burma. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. pp. 98–99. ISBN 978-0-374-16342-6.
  2. ^ a b Tarling, Nicholas. The Cambridge history of South East Asia: From c. 1500 to c. 1800. 1. Cambridge University Press. p. 238. ISBN 978-0-521-66370-0. ISBN 0-521-66370-9.
The Phra Bang Buddha, palladium of Lan Xang, the Kingdom of Luang Prabang, and is the namesake of Luang Prabang, Laos. The Phra Bang is regarded as the most sacred and culturally significant Buddha image in Laos. The image is Khmer in origin and cast using an alloy of bronze, gold and silver.