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Don García (Grand Master of Calatrava)

Don García was the first Grand Master of the Order of Calatrava from 1164 to 1169 and was responsible for the foundation of many of the order's rules and battle traditions. The exact location of Don García's birth and death are not known although it is believed that he was from Navarre; the reasons for him being named as the first Grand Master of Calatrava are unknown although the order was new at the time of his tenure in office, having been recognized by Papal Bull in 1164. What is certain is that García would have been an exceptional leader and soldier to be tapped for this prestigious role by King Alfonso VIII de Castilla which consisted of overseeing all lands and castles under the order's protection and control; the most famous castle being the one at Almadén. Under his Grandmastership, the order obtained its formal charter from the Papacy with its customs being modeled around the Cistercian Order from which Calatrava developed; the Papal Bull, amongst other things, obliged all member knights of the order to observe three ideological virtues.

Member knights were held to strict living rules such as maintaining silence in their dormitories and eateries, sleeping with their armor on for four days a week, to keep as their only garment of clothes, a white cloak with a simple black cross called the "Flordelisada". After his death, Don García was buried in a convent on the outskirts of Guadiana. In 1217, his remains were transferred to the Capilla de los Mártires de Calatrava la Nueva. Order of Calatrava List of Grand Masters of the Order of Calatrava Some of the information on this page was translated from its Spanish equivalent. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Documentos para el estudio de la Orden de Calatrava en la meseta meridional Castellana Francisco de Rades y Andrada: Catálogo de las obligaciones que tienen las personas del hábito de Calatrava, Published in 1571. Heraldic Hispania http://ec.aciprensa.com/o/ordenmilitardecalatrava.htm

2010–11 Los Angeles Lakers season

The 2010–11 Los Angeles Lakers season was the 63rd season of the franchise, 62nd in the National Basketball Association and 51st in Los Angeles. Coming off back-to-back championships, the Lakers attempted their third "three-peat" in franchise history and, but were swept by the eventual champion Dallas Mavericks in the Western Conference Semifinals; the Lakers marked the end of an era for legendary head coach Phil Jackson, diagnosed with prostate cancer in March 2011. He proceeded to announce his retirement as head coach after the playoffs; the Lakers once again sold out all 41 home games for the season at Staples Center. The Lakers clinched the Pacific Division for the 32nd time in franchise history. Despite winning as many games as last season, they did not win the top seed in the Western Conference playoffs, finishing the regular season four games behind the San Antonio Spurs. Lamar Odom became the first player in Lakers history to be named NBA Sixth Man of the Year. Following the season, Odom was traded to the Dallas Mavericks.

June 24 – The 2010 NBA draft was held in New York City. July 1 – The free agency period begun. October 26 – The Lakers' regular season began with a home game versus the Houston Rockets; the previous year's players received their championship rings and the team raised their 16th championship banner into the Staples Center rafters. February 20 – The 2011 NBA All-Star Game takes place in Los Angeles. February 24 – NBA trade deadline. March 20 – The Lakers clinched the Pacific Division title, clinching a playoff spot and at least the fourth seed in the playoffs. April 14 – The Lakers finished the regular season with a win against the Sacramento Kings, clinching the 2nd seed in the Western Conference playoffs in the process. May 8 – The Lakers were swept by the Dallas Mavericks in the second round of the Playoffs, ending the hopes of a three-peat. Entering the offseason, Derek Fisher, Adam Morrison, D. J. Mbenga and Josh Powell were all unrestricted free agents. Jordan Farmar was a restricted free agent, but the Lakers didn't extend a qualifying offer to him making him an unrestricted free agent.

Shannon Brown exercised the player option on his contract and opted out of the remaining year of his contract that would have paid him $2.15 million. Fisher was the Lakers' main priority to re-sign in the offseason, but there was disagreement over the amount of the contract's worth, with both sides arguing between 2.5 and 5 million dollars per season. Fisher agreed to a three-year contract worth $10.5 million with a player option on the final year. On July 2, the Lakers agreed to terms with Los Angeles Clippers free agent Steve Blake on a four-year contract worth $16 million using most of the team's mid-level exception; the Lakers signed Blake to a four-year contract on July 8. On July 22, the Lakers signed free agent forward Matt Barnes to a two-year deal worth $3.6 million and center Theo Ratliff to a one-year deal worth $1.35 million. On August 5, Shannon Brown's agent announced that the Lakers will resign Brown to a two-year deal worth $4.6 million. Brown turned down more lucrative offers from the Knicks and Hornets and has a player option on his second year.

Backup point guard Jordan Farmar left the Lakers, indicating his desire to be a starter and signed with the New Jersey Nets. Backup power forward Josh Powell signed with the Atlanta Hawks. D. J. Mbenga and Adam Morrison signed with the New Orleans Hornets and Washington Wizards, respectively; the Lakers signed both of their second-round draft picks Devin Ebanks and Derrick Caracter to non-guaranteed two-year deals. Ebanks earned the minimum rookie salary of $473,604; as he would stay with the Lakers, his second year salary was $736,420. Caracter agreed to a two-year, $1.1 million deal, guaranteed. Caracter earned $473,604 that season. On April 13 the Lakers signed Trey Johnson due to injuries on the roster. Head coach Phil Jackson agreed to a one-year deal after considering retiring. After Jackson's deal, the Lakers were able to reach agreements with the rest of the coaching staff. Longtime assistants Brian Shaw, Frank Hamblen and Jim Cleamons are returning and special assistant Chuck Person has been added to the staff.

In September, the Lakers signed Drew Naymick, Anthony Roberson, Trey Johnson, Russell Hicks to the training camp squad, bringing their total number of players to 18. By the start of the season, the Lakers can have at the most 15 players; the Lakers released all four players in October, bring their roster to 14 players. The Lakers started the season at home versus the Houston Rockets. Last year's players and staff received their 2010 NBA Championship rings and the Lakers raised their 16th championship banner in the Staples Center rafters. With Andrew Bynum missing the season opener, Pau Gasol moved from starting power forward to center and Lamar Odom moved from backup forward to starting power forward; the starting lineup to begin the season was: C – Andrew Bynum PF – Pau Gasol SF – Ron Artest SG – Kobe Bryant PG – Derek FisherThe Lakers started by winning their first four games while leading the NBA in scoring, 3-point shooting and offensive rebounds. They would go on to win their first eight games before losing back to back games in November.

During their first 14 games, notable performances have included Kobe Bryant recording a triple double in a November 3 win against the Sacramento Kings. Matt Barnes and Pau Gasol became the only players besides Charles Barkley to record 20 points, five rebounds and five assists without missing on at least five shots from the field and the free throw line, they accomplished this feat two days apart on November 19 and 21 win

Santa Maria Scala Coeli

Santa Maria Scala Coeli is a Roman Catholic Church located on the grounds of the Tre Fontane Abbey located on Via di Acque Salvie 1 in the Quartiere Ardeatino in Rome. This is one of three churches affiliated with the Trappist monastery, is located on a small lane, Via delle Tre Fontane, inside the abbey complex; the location of this church is held by tradition to be. On Via delle Tre Fontane in Rome. An ancient church at the site was refurbished in 1582 by Vignola under the patronage of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese. Subsequently the present church was designed by Giacomo della Porta under the patronage of Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini; the interior layout is octagonal. On the stairs leading to it can be seen writing and drawings scratched into the stone information from the architect to the builders; the church presbytery contains a mosaic by Francesco Zucca made after designs of Giovanni della Vecchia. An old tradition claims that 10,000 Christian slaves who died while building the Baths of Diocletian are buried in the church's crypt, are venerated as St Zeno and Companions.

Some dead slaves from this project are buried in catacombs in the nearby hillside, though the 10,000 figure must be exaggerated. According to legend, St Bernard had a vision while celebrating a requiem mass at the church; the vision was of the souls in purgatory he was praying for ascending to heaven by a ladder — the Scala Coeli, leading to the church's suffix. This vision was the basis for an indulgence attached to requiem masses celebrated in the church; the indulgence was granted to specific churches outside Rome. In 1500, Henry VII of England was granted the scala coeli indulgence for his new chapel in Westminster Abbey, the popularity of it in England grew rapidly. By the 1520s, bequests for masses "at Scala Coeli" were common; the church belongs to the Trappist Tre Fontane Abbey, along with the churches of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio and San Paolo alle Tre Fontane. The church of Scala Coeli was used by the Romanian Orthodox community in Rome before November 2002 when, to mark the visit to Rome of Teoctist, Patriarch of Romania, Pope John Paul II granted it to them.

They had gathered in the Chapel of Our Lady of Genezano off Via Cavour, but that chapel had become too small. Nyborg

Bruce M. Cohen

Bruce Mark Cohen was an American Rabbi who co-founded the Interns for Peace, an organization founded in Israel in 1976, dedicated to fostering understanding between Arabs and Israelis through the training of community development and peace workers. Cohen was born on May 8, 1945 in Buffalo, New York, where his father was a justice of the New York Supreme Court justice and his mother was a teacher, he earned his undergraduate degree at Cornell University with a major in labor relations. After a professor at Cornell convince him to pursue his spiritual side, Cohen attended Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, where he earned a bachelor's in Hebrew letters in 1970, a master's in 1973, the same year that he received his rabbinic ordination, he earned a doctorate from the college in 1988. After five Arab citizens of Israel were killed in Nazareth by Israeli security forces during the Land Day protest on March 30, 1976, his congregants from Congregation Mishkan Israel, Connecticut funded a mission to Israel for Cohen to promote peace.

While on his trip to Israel, he met Farhat Agbaria, an Israeli Arab who shared Cohen's vision of peace-building, the two co-founded Interns for Peace. Interns for Peace aims to foster peace through building personal connections between Arabs and Jews, with Cohen noting that "every time you create contact it's successful because it breaks stereotypes". Cohen sought to overcome longstanding attitudes in which Israeli Arabs are viewed as a fifth column, while Jews are labeled as oppressors. By the time of Cohen's death, the organization had trained 300 volunteers who have worked together on projects ranging from arts festivals to tree planting projects. Cohen's widow, Karen Wald Cohen, continues to serve as international director of Interns for Peace. Cohen died at age 65 on August 2, 2010, at his home in White Plains, New York due to cancer, he was survived by Karen Wald Cohen, whom he married in 1989, four adopted children, five grandchildren

Fosi Pala'amo

Fosi Pala'amo is a New Zealand professional rugby player of Samoan descent. Internationally, he plays for Samoa, he was born in New Zealand to Samoan parents. He was a player for the Irish team Leinster Rugby, but now works at Pfizer for a living and coaches the forwards on the Pfizer tag rugby team. Now coaching Monkstown u20s Pala'amo is a product of the famous Australian rugby club Randwick, where he was selected for the Australian Under 21 team, playing alongside Wallabies such as Tom Bowman and Stirling Mortlock. However, despite being hailed a Wallaby in the making, he switched his allegiance to Samoa, in 1998 at the age of 21, he made his debut for Samoa in the Oceania qualifying games for the 1999 world cup. However, he withdrew from the Samoa squad for the 1999 Rugby World Cup due to a serious knee injury which threatened to end his playing career. Pala'amo did not play international rugby again for eight years, he was recalled to the squad for the 2007 World Cup, despite not participating in the warm up games.

He was thrown in at the deep end against eventual runners-up, England. In total, Pala'amo has nine international caps for Samoa, he now lives in Dublin. He is the son of a Samoan church minister who has retired in Australia