Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra

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Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra
العيون - الساقية الحمراء
Region
Houses in Laayoune
Houses in Laayoune
Location in Morocco
Location in Morocco
Coordinates: 26°08′N 14°30′W / 26.133°N 14.500°W / 26.133; -14.500Coordinates: 26°08′N 14°30′W / 26.133°N 14.500°W / 26.133; -14.500
Country  Morocco
 Western Sahara
Created September 2015
Capital Laayoune
Government
 • Type Governor–regional council
 • Wali Yahdih Bouchab
 • Council president Hamdi Ould Errachid
Area[1]
 • Total 140,018 km2 (54,061 sq mi)
Population (1 September 2014)[2]
 • Total 367,758
 • Density 2.6/km2 (6.8/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+0 (WET)
 • Summer (DST) UTC+1 (WEST)

Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra (Arabic: العيون - الساقية الحمراء‎) is one of the twelve regions of Morocco. It is mainly located in the disputed territory of Western Sahara: the western part of the region is administered by Morocco and the eastern part by the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic. The region as claimed by Morocco covers an area of 140,018 square kilometres (54,061 sq mi)[1] and had a population of 367,758 as of the 2014 Moroccan census.[2] The capital of the region is Laâyoune.[3]

Geography[edit]

Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra borders the region of Guelmim-Oued Noun to the north and Dakhla-Oued Ed-Dahab to the south. It shares its eastern border with Mauritania's Tiris Zemmour Region, and to its west is the Atlantic Ocean. The towns of Tarfaya, El Marsa and Boujdour are located on the Atlantic coast, and the Canary Islands are located offshore. The regional capital Laâyoune is located inland near El Marsa, and the region's second-largest town Smara is located near its geographic centre. The Moroccan Wall runs through the region and the area to its east is under the control of the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic.

History[edit]

Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra was formed in September 2015 by attaching Es-Semara Province, formerly part of Guelmim-Es Semara region, to the former region of Laâyoune-Boujdour-Sakia El Hamra.[3]

Government[edit]

The first president of the regional council, Hamdi Ould Errachid, was elected on 14 September 2015.[4] He is a member of the Istiqlal Party and previously headed the council of the former Laâyoune-Boujdour-Sakia El Hamra region.[5] His uncle of the same name is the mayor of Laayoune.[6] Yahdih Bouchab was appointed governor (wali) of the region on 13 October 2015.[7]

Subdivisions[edit]

Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra consists of four provinces:[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "La Région de Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra" (PDF) (in French). Ministry of the Interior, Morocco. 2015. p. 2. Retrieved 9 October 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "POPULATION LÉGALE DES RÉGIONS, PROVINCES, PRÉFECTURES, MUNICIPALITÉS, ARRONDISSEMENTS ET COMMUNES DU ROYAUME D'APRÈS LES RÉSULTATS DU RGPH 2014" (in Arabic and French). High Commission for Planning. 8 April 2015. Retrieved 29 September 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "Décret fixant le nom des régions" (PDF). Portail National des Collectivités Territoriales (in French). 20 February 2015. Archived from the original (pdf) on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 11 December 2015. 
  4. ^ "Sidi Hamdi Ould Errachid élu président de la région Laâyoune-Sakia Al Hamra" [Sidi Hamdi Ould Errachid elected president of Laâyoune-Sakia Al Hamra region]. La Nouvelle Tribune (in French). 14 September 2015. Retrieved 11 December 2015. 
  5. ^ Laabid, Mohamed (1 October 2012). "Laâyoune: Sidi Hamdi Ould Rachid reconduit à la tête du conseil régional" [Laâyoune: Sidi Hamdi Ould Rachid renewed as head of regional council]. Aujourd'hui Le Maroc (in French). Retrieved 11 December 2015. 
  6. ^ Alami, Ziad (13 September 2015). "Régionales 2015: le Parti de l'Istiqlal renforce sa poigne sur la région de Laâyoune-Saguia Al Hamra" [Regional elections 2015: the Istiqlal Party reinforces its grip on Laâyoune-Saguia Al Hamra region]. Le360 (in French). Retrieved 11 December 2015. 
  7. ^ "SM le Roi a procédé à la nomination les Walis des régions" [His majesty the King appointed the Walis of the regions]. La Vie Éco (in French). 14 October 2015. Retrieved 13 December 2015.