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LaMoure County, North Dakota

LaMoure County is a county in the U. S. state of North Dakota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 4,139, its county seat is LaMoure. The Dakota Territory legislature created the county on January 4, 1873, with Grand Rapids as the county seat. However, the county organization was not completed at that time, nor was the county attached to another county for administrative and judicial purposes, it was named for Judson LaMoure, a member of the territorial/state legislature from 1872–1918. The county organization was effected on October 27, 1881, its boundaries were altered in February 1881 and in March 1883. It has retained its present boundary since that time; the present county seat, LaMoure, was founded in 1882, the county seat was transferred to that community soon after. The James River flows southeasterly through the central portion of LaMoure County, a tributary of the South Branch Maple River flows southerly from the center of the county; the county terrain consists of rolling hills devoted to agriculture.

The terrain slopes to the east. The county has a total area of 1,151 square miles, of which 1,146 square miles is land and 4.9 square miles is water. LaMoure County hosts the Naval Radio Transmitter Facility LaMoure. Kulm Municipal Airport - public use airport NE of Kulm. Bone Hill National Wildlife Refuge As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 4,701 people, 1,942 households, 1,308 families in the county; the population density was 4 people per square mile. There were 2,271 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile; the racial makeup of the county was 99.23% White, 0.02% African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 0.11% from other races, 0.34% from two or more races. 0.55% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 50.7 % were of 5.5 % Swedish ancestry. There were 1,942 households out of which 27.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.50% were married couples living together, 4.00% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.60% were non-families.

30.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.60% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.99. The county population contained 24.20% under the age of 18, 5.40% from 18 to 24, 23.00% from 25 to 44, 24.00% from 45 to 64, 23.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 102.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.70 males. The median income for a household in the county was $29,707, the median income for a family was $36,495. Males had a median income of $26,351 versus $17,500 for females; the per capita income for the county was $17,059. 14.70% of the population and 12.30% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 16.30% are under the age of 18 and 12.90% are 65 or older. As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,139 people, 1,825 households, 1,182 families in the county; the population density was 3.61/sqmi.

There were 2,238 housing units at an average density of 1.95/sqmi. The racial makeup of the county was 98.5% white, 0.4% American Indian, 0.1% black or African American, 0.1% Asian, 0.2% from other races, 0.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.8% of the population. In terms of ancestry, 63.0% were German, 27.6% were Norwegian, 6.2% were Swedish, 6.1% were Russian, 6.0% were English, 2.8% were American. Of the 1,825 households, 22.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.9% were married couples living together, 4.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 35.2% were non-families, 32.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.82. The median age was 49.2 years. The median income for a household in the county was $46,098 and the median income for a family was $60,932. Males had a median income of $41,250 versus $25,172 for females; the per capita income for the county was $27,056.

About 6.8% of families and 9.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 16.9% of those age 65 or over. Alfred The United States Navy commissioned two tank landing ships named for the county; the first, USS La Moure County, was commissioned January 23, 1945, served until December 7, 1959. The second, USS La Moure County, was commissioned December 1, 1971 and served until November 17, 2000. LaMoure County voters are traditionally Republican. In only one national election since 1936 has the county selected the Democratic Party candidate. National Register of Historic Places listings in LaMoure County, North Dakota LaMoure County bicentennial celebration: July 2, 3, 4, 5, 1976, Memorial Park, Grand Rapids, N. D. from the *Digital Horizons website In the valley of the Jim from the Digital Horizons website

Sam DeWitt

Samuel Aaron DeWitt was a businessman, poet and politician. He was a New York State Legislator who represented Bronx's 7th district from 1919 until his expulsion from the assembly in 1920 during the First Red Scare. DeWitt was born on November 1891 in Jackson, New York, he was an active Socialist throughout his life. DeWitt first applied for membership in the Socialist Party on August 29, 1913. Sam Dewitt is most famous for being expelled in 1920 from the New York State Assembly along with four fellow assemblymen for being members of the Socialist Party; the five Socialists were barred from taking their seats at the beginning of the session of the 143rd New York State Legislature and, after a protracted "trial" before the Assembly Committee on the Judiciary, defended by Morris Hillquit and Seymour Stedman, were expelled on April 1. All five were re-elected at a special election on September 16, appeared to take their seats at the beginning of the special session on September 20; the next day, DeWitt and Samuel Orr were permitted to take their seats, but August Claessens, Charles Solomon and Louis Waldman were expelled again.

Protesting against the re-expulsion of their comrades, DeWitt and Orr resigned their seats. Afterwards DeWitt was a frequent candidate for political office, without success, he ran in the Bronx 7th District in 1924 and 1926, for Bronx borough president in 1925, for the Bronx 3rd District in 1927 and 1929, the Queens 4th District in 1932. DeWitt made several unsuccessful campaigns for United States Congress, running in the 22nd District of New York in 1928, the 2nd District of New York in 1934 and once again in 1935. During the bitter faction fights of the 1930s in the Socialist Party, DeWitt authored a weekly piece for The Socialist Call, a newspaper published each Saturday in New York City in opposition to the journal of the Old Guard faction, The New Leader. DeWitt authored a regular column called "Turn to the Left," in which he expounded upon his political beliefs. While not accepting the Old Guard's extreme gradualist approach, neither was DeWitt a communist. With regard to the Communist Party's efforts to establish a united front in 1935, DeWitt wrote: "I can only deplore capacity for hatred.

I can only distrust their sincerity when they call me to a'united front.' I can only say to them:'Lenin was a great teacher and undoubtedly a great leader. But he was a human. "It is quite possible that he erred when he instructed you to treat Socialists who believed in achieving revolution through democracy in other lands, as enemies of the workers. It is quite possible that he was wrong in his decision that all means foul, must be used against the enemies of the masses.... It is possible that Socialists have a right to question whether Lenin or you or any of your committees are God.'" The battle between the Old Guard headed by Louis Waldman against a bloc of the Militant faction of Jack Altman with the "Progressive" group headed by Norman Thomas came to a head in the last days of 1935. DeWitt sided decisively with the latter grouping, breaking ranks with his long-time comrades of the Old Guard. DeWitt stood as a candidate for the New York State Committee of the SPA as part of the Progressive/Militant slate in the April 2, 1936, New York primaries and he won election in Queens County Assembly District 4.

The Progressive/Militant bloc won a comfortable majority of seats on the State Committee in this election. In a last-gasp effort to retain power, New York Socialist Party State Chairman Waldman called a snap reorganizational meeting on 3 days' notice after the certification of the primary results, to be held in the distant city of Buffalo, as was his prerogative under that state constitution; the Old Guard was defeated in this effort to outmaneuver their opposition with timing and geography and Harry W. Laidler defeated Waldman in his bid for re-election at the April reorganizational meeting by a vote of 60-42. DeWitt was elected State Treasurer of the Socialist Party of New York at this session. DeWitt was a long-time friend of left wing writer Upton Sinclair. In Sinclair's famous muckraking novel The Jungle, published in 1906, one of the main characters, Nicolas Schliemann, is said to be based on Sam DeWitt. Throughout his life, DeWitt was publishing books in both genres. From the 1930s, Sam DeWitt was the President and Treasurer of the DeWitt Tool Company, with offices at 252 Lafayette Street in New York City.

The firm bought and sold used machinery and equipment, included among its services the liquidation of defunct industrial plants. The company had for its slogan "The House of a Thousand Bargains."DeWitt died on January 22, 1963 in Yonkers, New York. He was survived by his wife Augusta, who died in 1985. DeWitt's great grandson is founder of EarthLink. Idylls of the Ghetto and Other Poems. New York: Rand Book Store, 1927. Riding the Storm: Poems. New York: Academy Press, n.d.. Rhapsodies in Red: Songs for the Social Revolution. New York: Rand School Press, 1933. Harvest: Collected Poems. New York: Burmond Press, 1937; the Shoemaker of the Stars and Other Poems. New York: Parnassus Press, 1940. Where are the Snows? A Drama of Mediæval France. New York: Parnassus Press, 1941. Rhyme without Reason: A Comedy without Manners, in Three Acts and Six Scenes. New York: Parnassus Press, 1941. More Sonnets to a Dark Lady, Others. New York: Parnassus Press, 1942. Where Are the Snows? A Play in Two Acts and Nine Scenes. New York: Parnassus Press, 1942.

Words for Music: A Book of Lyrics. New York: Parnassus Press, 1942. Shoes for the Stars: A Play in Three Acts for Children of All Ages. New York: Parnassus Press, 1944. No Road Back: Poems. With Walter Mehring

William E. Parsons

William Edward Parsons was an architect and city planner known for his works in the Philippines during the early period of American colonization in the country. He was a consulting architect to the United States government from 1905 to 1914, he was born on June 1872 in Akron, Ohio. He was educated at Yale University, École des Beaux-Arts in Paris During the early years of American reconstruction in the Philippines, at the height of the City Beautiful movement, the former Governor-General of the Philippines, Howard Taft, initiated a comprehensive building construction and city planning in the country, he was the United States Secretary of War when he instructed William Cameron Forbes a member of the Philippine Commission, to engage competent advice on this subject. He induced architect Daniel H. Burnham, the leading spirit in the architectural design and construction of the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago, to visit the islands, which he did together with his designer, Pierce Anderson, making general preliminary plans for the cities of Manila and Baguio.

This was followed by the recommendation that an architect of suitable training and experience be appointed as consulting architect for the Government. Parsons was appointed for the job. At the time of his selection he was practicing architecture in New York City, having graduated from École des Beaux-Arts, Paris. With enthusiastic ambition, the best heritage of a thorough French training, he went to Manila in November, 1905. Under the terms of his appointment as a consulting architect created by the Philippine Commission Act No. 1495, he was given general architectural supervision over the design of all public buildings and parks throughout the islands, including provincial and municipal work as well as insular. He was charged with interpretation of the preliminary plans prepared by Messrs. Burnham and Anderson for Manila and Baguio, it remained for the American architect to establish city plans and buildings of a permanent nature suited to the needs and requirements of a tropical country. He received a salary from the Government which paid the cost of etc..

He was allowed to engage in private practice, maintained a separate office during most of his years in Manila. He served until February, 1914, resigning because "there seemed to be no further progress to be made under the scuttle policy of the present administration." He was replaced by his assistant, George Corner Fenhagen, as the Consulting Architect of the Philippine government. One of the features of local architecture he adopted on his design at the high-end Manila Hotel, was the use of Capiz shells for window sash in place of glass; the Capiz shell is a flat sea shell about 4 inches in diameter. It is trimmed down to squares, they give a soft pearly light. One of the most widespread designs of Parsons is the Gabaldon schoolhouse; these are school buildings constructed in the Philippines between 1907 and 1946 and named after the late assemblyman Isauro Gabaldon of Nueva Ecija, who authored the Gabaldon Act which appropriated P1 million for the construction of modern public schools nationwide.

He died on December 1939 at his home in New Haven, Connecticut. Customs Office, Cebu City Manila Army and Navy Club Building, Manila Manila Elks Club, Manila Manila Hotel, Manila Paco railway station, Manila Philippine General Hospital Philippine Normal School Provincial Capitol of Laguna Province in Santa Cruz, Laguna Provincial Capitol of Nueva Ecija in Cabanatuan City University Hall of the University of the Philippines Manila The Mansion House, Baguio Provincial Capitol of Capiz Province in Roxas City, Capiz Architecture of the Philippines

San Pedro, Texas

San Pedro is a census-designated place in Cameron County, United States. The population was 530 at the 2010 census, it is part of the Brownsville–Harlingen Metropolitan Statistical Area. San Pedro is located in southern Cameron County at 25°58′46″N 97°35′56″W, 8 miles northwest of the center of Brownsville via U. S. Route 281; the community is less than one mile northeast of the Rio Grande, which forms the Mexico–United States border. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.5 square miles, all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 668 people, 179 households, 148 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 269.9 people per square mile. There were 191 housing units at an average density of 77.2/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 0.15 % African American, 40.27 % from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 96.56% of the population. There were 179 households out of which 41.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.5% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 16.8% were non-families.

12.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.73 and the average family size was 4.09. In the CDP, the population was spread out with 33.2% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.8 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $29,531, the median income for a family was $35,192. Males had a median income of $16,711 versus $12,188 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $7,287. About 27.3% of families and 27.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.6% of those under age 18 and 29.0% of those age 65 or over. San Pedro is served by the Brownsville Independent School District. In addition, South Texas Independent School District operates magnet schools that serve the community

James Nitties

James Evangelo Nitties is an Australian professional golfer who has played on the PGA Tour and now plays on the PGA Tour of Australasia. Nitties was born in Australia, he suffered from juvenile arthritis as a child and young adult. This caused him to have to take pain killers to restrict the pain from his back. In 2003, he finished second at the Western Amateur to Ryan Moore in 19 holes, he turned professional in 2004. In 2004, Nitties joined the NGA Hooters Tour. While he played the Hooters Tour, he played a select few of events on the Nationwide Tour and the PGA Tour of Australasia. Nitties took part on the Golf Channel's series The Big Break: Mesquite where he was eliminated during the 7th episode. Nitties qualified for the PGA Tour in 2009 by finishing in a tie for second at Q-school with Derek Fathauer, behind Harrison Frazar, he had success in his rookie season on the PGA Tour in 2009, with two top ten finishes early at the FBR Open, where he held the first round lead and the Mayakoba Golf Classic at Riviera Maya-Cancun.

He shared the opening round lead at the HP Byron Nelson Championship. He retained his tour card. Nitties won the 2011 Midwest Classic on the Nationwide Tour, he finished 26th on the Nationwide Tour's money list, one spot short of a promotion to the PGA Tour. On 8 February 2019, Nitties matched the world record of nine consecutive birdies in the ISPS Handa Vic Open, his birdie run from the 15th to the fifth in the first round set a European Tour record and matched Mark Calcavecchia's feat in the 2009 Canadian Open. 2006 Base Camp Realty Chesdin Landing Open 2008 Aspen Group Western Australia Open Note: Nitties only played in the U. S. Open. CUT = missed the half-way cut Amateur Eisenhower Trophy: 2004 Bonallack Trophy: 2004 2008 PGA Tour Qualifying School graduates James Nitties at the PGA Tour official site James Nitties at the PGA Tour of Australasia official site James Nitties at the Official World Golf Ranking official site

Jardin botanique alpin du Lautaret

The Jardin botanique alpin du Lautaret is an alpine botanical garden located at 2100 metres altitude in the Col du Lautaret of the Dauphiné Alps, near Villar-d'Arêne, Hautes-Alpes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France. It is open daily in the warmer months; the garden was created in 1899 by combined effort of the Touring Club de France, Professor Jean-Paul Lachmann of the Université scientifique de Grenoble, M. Bonnabel, local hotelier, it was moved in 1919 to make way for a new road, is now sited with excellent views of the Meije glaciers. The garden was abandoned during World War II, subsequently restored by Robert Ruffier-Lanche, declined again after his death in 1973, revived in the early 1980s. In 1998 it was recognized by the Conservatoire des Collections Végétales Spécialisées, in 2005 it became a part of the Station Alpine Joseph Fourier. Today the garden contains more than 2,100 species of alpine plants from around the world, continues to be managed by the Université Grenoble Alpes as it has since its creation.

Plants are presented in rockeries corresponding to four major themes: geographical origin, habitat and taxonomy. List of botanical gardens in France Jardin botanique alpin du Lautaret Grenoble Montagne description 1001 Fleurs entry Gralon.net entry