Latticework

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Mashrabiya screen on display at the British Museum

Latticework is an openwork framework consisting of a criss-crossed pattern of strips of building material, typically wood or metal. The design is created by crossing the strips to form a grid or weave.[1] Latticework may be functional – for example, to allow airflow to or through an area; structural, as a truss in a lattice girder;[2] used to add privacy, as through a lattice screen; purely decorative; or some combination of these.

Latticework in stone or wood from the classical period is also called transenna (plural transenne).

In India, the house of a rich or noble person may be built with a baramdah or verandah surrounding every level leading to the living area; the upper floors often have balconies overlooking the street that are shielded by latticed screens carved in stone called jalis which keep the area cool and give privacy.[3]

Examples[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ching, Francis D.K. (1995). A Visual Dictionary of Architecture. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. p. 27. ISBN 0-471-28451-3.
  2. ^ "Latticework". Retrieved 2007-02-27.
  3. ^ Thapar, Binda (2004). Introduction to Asian Architecture. Singapore: Periplus Editions. pp. 16–17. ISBN 0-7946-0011-5.

External links[edit]