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London Borough of Haringey

The London Borough of Haringey is a London borough in North London, classified by some definitions as part of Inner London, by others as part of Outer London. It was created in 1965 by the amalgamation of three former boroughs, it shares borders with six other London boroughs. Clockwise from the north, they are: Enfield, Waltham Forest, Islington and Barnet. Haringey covers an area of more than 11 square miles; some of the more familiar local landmarks include Alexandra Palace, Bruce Castle, Jacksons Lane, Highpoint I and II, Tottenham Hotspur Football Club. The borough has extreme contrasts: areas in the west, such as Highgate, Muswell Hill and Crouch End are among the most prosperous in the country. Haringey is a borough of contrasts geographically. From the wooded high ground around Highgate and Muswell Hill, at 426.5 feet, the land falls away to the flat, open low-lying land beside the River Lea in the east. The borough includes large areas of green space. In the Last Glacial Maximum, Haringey was at the edge of a huge glacial mass that reached as far south as Muswell Hill.

There is evidence of both Stone Bronze Age activity. Prior to the Romans' arrival, Haringey was part of a large area covering Essex and Middlesex, home to a Celtic tribe called Trinobantes; the Romans' presence is evidenced chiefly by the roads. Tottenham High Road was part of the main Roman thoroughfare of Ermine Street. There have been Roman finds in the borough which suggests possible Roman settlement. In the 5th and 6th centuries the Saxon invasions brought Haering, the chieftain whose name still lives on today in local placenames. Haringey remained a rural area until the 18th century when large country houses close to London became common; the coming of the railways from the mid-nineteenth century onwards led to rapid urbanisation. The borough in its modern form was founded in 1965, from the former Municipal Borough of Hornsey, the Municipal Borough of Wood Green and the Municipal Borough of Tottenham which had all been part of Middlesex; the new borough became part of the new Greater London Council.

However, some legacy of the historic municipal divisions survives to the present day, with the relative prosperity of the different parts of the borough still split broadly along the old boundary lines. The town hall is the Civic Centre on Wood Green High Road, it was opened in 1958. It is a listed building. Although much of the building is now unused, the Civic Centre is the official seat of Haringey Council and contains the council chambers; the names Haringey and Hornsey in use today are all different variations of the same Old English: Hæringeshege. Hæring was a Saxon chief who lived in the area around Hornsey. Hæringeshege meant Hæring's enclosure and evolved into Haringey and Hornsey; the official heraldic arms were granted on 10 May 1965, after the mergers of the former Municipal Borough of Hornsey, the Municipal Borough of Wood Green and the Municipal Borough of Tottenham. Unlike most other London boroughs, it was decided not to create arms based on the charges in the coats of arms of the former boroughs.

The coat of arms contains black and gold, representing stability, a cogwheel for industry and a rising sun for the new borough. The borough has a simple badge described as "Eight Rays". A flag is used which looks like a banner of arms but with the tinctures reversed, so that it has eight black rays on a yellow field; the arms is used in the mayoral regalia of the borough. The mayoral chain has the heraldic achievement hanging in a badge made out of 18 k gold and enamel, with the text "The London Borough of Haringey MCMLXV"; the chain has stylized hares sitting within laurel wreaths. The hares represent the name of the borough, since Haringey is believed to mean "a meadow of Hares". Haringey is a borough of contrasts geographically. From the wooded high ground around Highgate and Muswell Hill, at 426.5 feet, the land falls away to the flat, open low-lying land beside the River Lea in the east. 60 hectares within the borough are designated as part of the Metropolitan Green Belt. Haringey shares borders with six other London boroughs.

Clockwise from the north, they are: Enfield, Waltham Forest, Islington and Barnet. It covers an area of more than 11 square miles; some of the more familiar local landmarks include Alexandra Palace, Bruce Castle and Tottenham Hotspur Football Club. Haringey has 600 acres of parks, recreation grounds and open spaces which make up more than 25% of its total area, they include both smaller local areas and large green areas which provide an amenity for Londoners beyond the borough's boundaries. Local Nature Reserves and a number of conservation areas can be found in the borough; the borough is home to five distinct ancient woods. These are Queen's Wood, Coldfall Wood, Bluebell Wood and North Wood; the borough has achieved Green Flag status for 25 of its parks, meaning they are judged to be welcoming and well-managed, with active community involvement. Amongst the larger open spaces are: Finsbury Park, Alexandra Park, Highgate Wood, Coldfall Wood and the Lee Valley Park. There are three rivers of note still flowing above ground in the borough.

These are: River Moselle The New River River Lea There are a large number of districts within the borough. For a complete list see List of districts in Haringey

Shabo, Odessa Oblast

Shabo is a town of the Odesa Oblast, situated at the Dniester Liman, some 7 km downstream of Bilhorod-Dnistrovskyi. The Tatar village was established. 1500, called Acha-abag "the lower vineyards". The name was subsequently simplified to Shabag and to Shaba / Shabo. After the conquest of Bessarabia by the Russian Empire, the region suffered a population drain to the Ottoman Empire. Shabo in 1812 had been deserted by four families. Alexander I decided to re-populate the region, in 1822 inviting Swiss settlers of Vaud to cultivate the vineyards of Shabo; the descendants of these settlers inhabit Shabo to the present day, Shabo wine remains famous for its quality. Charles Upson Clark, Bessarabia: Russia and Roumania on the Black Sea, chapter 8. Ukrainian wine Şaba - un avanpost européen sur le Nistre by Ioan Papa Шабо Торговая марка «Шабо»

Maria Muldaur (album)

Maria Muldaur is the 1973 debut studio album of musician Maria Muldaur. The album includes "Midnight at the Oasis", her best-known single, which charted at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 and "Three Dollar Bill", which charted at #7 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary charts; the album, which peaked at #3 on The Billboard 200, was certified gold by the RIAA on May 13, 1974. The album was positively reviewed, positively in at least one case. Writing in October 1973, Rolling Stone's reviewer Jon Landau described the album as "one of the half-dozen best" of the year, "the kind of glorious breakthrough that reminds me why I fell in love with rock & roll." The album is influenced by country and blues. Side One "Any Old Time" – 3:45 "Midnight at the Oasis" – 3:49 "My Tennessee Mountain Home" – 3:32 "I Never Did Sing You a Love Song" – 2:49 "The Work Song" – 4:04Side Two "Don't You Feel My Leg" – 2:48 "Walkin' One and Only" – 2:47 "Long Hard Climb" – 3:03 "Three Dollar Bill" – 3:58 "Vaudeville Man" – 2:41 "Mad Mad Me" – 3:13 Maria Muldaur - vocals Clarence White - acoustic guitar Bill Keith - banjo, steel guitar Ry Cooder - acoustic guitar David Lindley - Hawaiian guitar Andrew Gold - acoustic guitar David Nichtern - acoustic ("Long Hard Climb", "I Never Did Sing You a Love Song", "My Tennessee Home", "The Work Song", "Walkin' One and Only" and "Midnight at the Oasis" & electric guitar, producer David Grisman - mandolin Dr. John - keyboards, horn arrangements Jim Dickinson - piano Mark T. Jordan - piano Spooner Oldham - piano Greg Prestopino - piano, background vocals, voices James Gordon - organ, clarinet Chris Ethridge - bass Klaus Voormann - bass Ray Brown - bass Dave Holland - bowed bass Jimmy Calhoun - bass Tommy McClure - bass Freebo - bass Amos Garrett - bass, vocals, guitar solo Jim Keltner - drums Ed Shaughnessy - drums John Boudreaux - drums Jim Gordon - drums Chris Parker - drums Jerry Jumonville - alto horn, horn arrangements Artie Butler - alto horn, horn arrangements Nick DeCaro - accordion, string arrangements Richard Greene - violin Larry Packer - violin, viola Karen Alexander - background vocals Gloria Jones - background vocals Ellen Kearney - background vocals Bettye LaVette - background vocals Jessica Smith - background vocals Beryl Marriott - violin