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Lord Alfred Douglas

Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas was a British poet and journalist best known as the lover of Oscar Wilde. While studying at Oxford, he edited an undergraduate journal, The Spirit Lamp, which carried a homoerotic subtext, met Wilde, with whom he started a close but stormy relationship. Douglas’s father, the Marquess of Queensberry, disapproved of the affair, set out to humiliate Wilde, publicly accusing him of homosexuality. Wilde sued him for criminal libel, but some of his intimate notes were discovered, he was duly jailed. On his release, he lived with Douglas in Naples, but they were separated by the time Wilde died in 1900. Douglas married Olive Custance in 1902, they produced a son Raymond. Converting to Roman Catholicism in 1911, he repudiated Wilde’s homosexuality, in a High-Catholic magazine, Plain English, he expressed views that were anti-semitic, though he rejected the extreme policies of Nazi Germany, he was jailed for libelling Winston Churchill over claims of wartime misconduct. Douglas wrote several books of some of it classified in the homoerotic Uranian genre.

The phrase "The love that dare not speak its name" came from one of Douglas’s poems, though it is misattributed to Wilde. Douglas was born at Ham Hill House in Powick, the third son of The Most Hon. John Douglas, 9th Marquess of Queensberry and his first wife, Sibyl Montgomery, he was his mother's favourite child. His mother sued for divorce in 1887 on the grounds of his father's adultery; the Marquess married Ethel Weeden in 1893 but the marriage was annulled the following year. Douglas was educated at Wixenford School, Winchester College and Magdalen College, which he left without obtaining a degree. At Oxford, he edited an undergraduate journal, The Spirit Lamp, an activity that intensified the constant conflict between him and his father, their relationship had always been a strained one and during the Queensberry-Wilde feud, Douglas sided with Wilde encouraging Wilde to prosecute the Marquess for libel. In 1893, Douglas had a brief affair with George Ives. In 1858 his grandfather, Archibald Douglas, 8th Marquess of Queensberry, died in what was reported as a shooting accident, but was believed to have been suicide.

In 1862, his widowed grandmother, Lady Queensberry, converted to Roman Catholicism and took her children to live in Paris. One of his uncles, Lord James Douglas, was attached to his twin sister "Florrie" and was heartbroken when she married a baronet, Sir Alexander Beaumont Churchill Dixie. In 1885, Lord James tried to abduct a young girl, after that became more manic. Separated from Florrie, James drank himself into a deep depression, in 1891 committed suicide by cutting his throat. Another of his uncles, Lord Francis Douglas had died in a climbing accident on the Matterhorn, his uncle Lord Archibald Edward Douglas, on the other hand, became a clergyman. Alfred Douglas's aunt, Lord James's twin Lady Florence Dixie, was an author, war correspondent for the Morning Post during the First Boer War, a feminist. In 1890, she published a novel, Gloriana, or the Revolution of 1900, in which women's suffrage is achieved after a woman posing as a man named Hector D'Estrange is elected to the House of Commons.

The character D'Estrange is based on Oscar Wilde. In 1891, Douglas's cousin Lionel Johnson introduced him to Oscar Wilde. In 1894, the Robert Hichens novel The Green Carnation was published. Said to be a roman à clef based on the relationship of Wilde and Douglas, it was one of the texts used against Wilde during his trials in 1895. Douglas has been described as spoiled, reckless and extravagant, he expected Wilde to contribute to funding his tastes. They argued and broke up, but would always reconcile. Douglas had praised Wilde's play Salome in the Oxford magazine, The Spirit Lamp, of which he was editor. Wilde had written Salomé in French, in 1893 he commissioned Douglas to translate it into English. Douglas's French was poor and his translation was criticised. Douglas was angered at Wilde's criticism, claimed that the errors were in fact in Wilde's original play; this led to a hiatus in the relationship and a row between the two men, with angry messages being exchanged and the involvement of the publisher John Lane and the illustrator Aubrey Beardsley when they themselves objected to Douglas's work.

Beardsley complained to Robbie Ross: "For one week the numbers of telegraph and messenger boys who came to the door was scandalous". Wilde redid much of the translation himself, but, in a gesture of reconciliation, suggested that Douglas be dedicated as the translator rather than credited, along with him, on the title-page. Accepting this, somewhat vainly, likened a dedication to sharing the title-page as "the difference between a tribute of admiration from an artist and a receipt from a tradesman". In 1894, Douglas came and visited Oscar Wilde in Worthing, much to the consternation of the latter's wife Constance. On another occasion, while staying with Wilde in Brighton, Douglas fell ill with influenza and was nursed by Wilde, but failed to return the favour when Wilde himself fell ill

Loup City, Nebraska

Loup City is the county seat of Sherman County, in the central portion of the Midwestern state of Nebraska, United States. The population was 1,029 at the 2010 census. Loup City is close to the Middle Loup River, about five miles from Sherman Reservoir; the first settlement at Loup City was made in the early 1870s. Loup City was platted in 1873, designated county seat. Loup City was named after the Loup River. During the Great Depression, Loup City was the site of a clash between radical leftists, influenced by Mother Bloor, who clashed with area residents in June 1934 following efforts by Communists to organize the workers of a poultry processing plant; the completion of Sherman Reservoir in 1963 added tourism to the area's economic base. Sherman Dam - 2,845-acre lake and 4,721 land acres. Primitive camping includes 360 non-pad sites. Facilities include picnic tables, water, modern restrooms, vault toilets, four boat ramps, fish cleaning stations, coin-operated showers and concession. Bowman Recreation Area - Bowman Lake, located one mile west of Loup City, is a 23-acre area lying adjacent to the Loup River and features a 20-acre man made lake.

It offers picnicking and primitive camping. Jenners Park - At one time, Jenner's Park was home to a zoo. Today, the park is home to a disc golf course, two picnic shelters, outdoor grills, playground equipment, an outdoor recreation area. Loup City Swimming Pool - Newly built in 2000, the Loup City pool has a water slide, diving board, basketball hoop and zero depth entry. Loup City Golf Course - A 9-hole course located one mile west of Loup City; the par 36 course has mature trees, a creek, several ponds. Petersen Park Ball Fields - Two newly developed baseball fields used for T-ball teams to high school softball teams; the park includes a playground area for younger children. Loup City is located at 41°16′38″N 98°58′5″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.94 square miles, all land. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,029 people, 462 households, 263 families residing in the city; the population density was 1,094.7 inhabitants per square mile. There were 569 housing units at an average density of 605.3 per square mile.

The racial makeup of the city was 98.7% White, 0.1% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.2% from other races, 0.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.6% of the population. There were 462 households of which 23.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.4% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.0% had a male householder with no wife present, 43.1% were non-families. 40.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.81. The median age in the city was 48.1 years. 22.2% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 53.2 % female. For many years Loup City has proclaimed itself as the "Polish capital of Nebraska," due to a significant Polish population. "Polish Days" is an annual community event held on the first weekend of June. The town's Catholic church, Saint Josaphat's, features stained glass windows commemorating area families, most with Polish names.

The windows were salvaged from date from the early 1900s. The early Loup City settlement has been depicted in the 2014 movie The Homesman. Edmund C. Jaeger - Desert ecologist and naturalist who taught at Riverside City College in Riverside, California for 30 years Richard Raymond - Prominent Nebraska doctor and Undersecretary in the Department of Agriculture during the George W. Bush Administration Charles H. Mohr - News correspondent during the Vietnam War and in the Middle East

Bagnell, Missouri

Bagnell is a city in Miller County, United States. The population was 93 at the 2010 census. Bagnell was platted in 1882; the city was named after William Bagnell of St. Louis County, who operated a tie business along the Osage River. A post office called Bagnell was established in 1884, remained in operation until 1942. Bagnell is located at 38°13′45″N 92°36′21″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.60 square miles, of which 0.47 square miles is land and 0.13 square miles is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 93 people, 43 households, 24 families residing in the city; the population density was 197.9 inhabitants per square mile. There were 60 housing units at an average density of 127.7 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 5.4 % from two or more races. There were 43 households of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.9% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.7% had a male householder with no wife present, 44.2% were non-families.

32.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.6% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.71. The median age in the city was 42.3 years. 23.7% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 50.5 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 86 people, 36 households, 20 families residing in the town; the population density was 183.3 people per square mile. There were 37 housing units at an average density of 78.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 96.51% White and 3.49% Native American. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.16% of the population. There were 36 households out of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.9% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 41.7% were non-families. 38.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 22.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older.

The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 3.00. In the town the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 20.9% from 45 to 64, 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males. The median income for a household in the town was $25,313, the median income for a family was $27,857. Males had a median income of $22,083 versus $16,563 for females; the per capita income for the town was $14,633. There were no families and 2.2% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 11.1% of those over 64