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List of hospitals in Staten Island

This is a list of hospitals in Staten Island, sorted by hospital name, with addresses and a brief description of their formation and development. Hospital names were obtained from these sources. A list of hospitals in New York State is available. Richmond University Medical Center, branches at 355 Bard Avenue and 75 Vanderbilt Avenue, Staten Island. Both branches became Richmond University Medical Center on January 1, 2007; the branch on Bard Avenue opened as St. Vincent's Hospital of Staten Island on Thanksgiving Day in 1903; the branch on Vanderbilt Avenue opened on October 1, 1831 as Seaman's Retreat, part of the Marine Hospital Service, became a United States Public Health Service Hospital in the 1930s, was sold to the Sisters of Charity of New York and renamed Bayley Seton Hospital in 1980. Staten Island University Hospital - formed via the merger of Staten Island and Richmond Memorial Hospitals in 1989. North Division, 475 Seaview Avenue. Founded as the S. R. Smith Infirmary in memory of Dr. Samuel Russell Smith in 1861, moved to Tompkins Avenue in 1864, moved to 85 Hannah Street in 1870, moved to 101 Stanley Avenue in 1890, renamed Staten Island Hospital in 1916, moved to 475 Seaview Avenue in 1979.

South Division, 375 Seguine Avenue. Founded as Richmond Memorial Hospital in 1921. Includes former names of hospitals Bayley Seton Hospital, 75 Vanderbilt Avenue, Staten Island. See Richmond University Medical Center in the section on hospitals in Staten Island above. Doctor's Hospital of 1050 Targee Street, Staten Island. Founded as Sunnyside Hospital in 1940, moved to make way for the Staten Island Expressway in 1940 and relocated to Targee Street in 1963, merged with Staten Island University Hospital, closed in 2003; the building was demolished and is now Public School 48. Embarkation Hospital no. 3, Hoffman Island, Staten Island. Opened as the Hoffman Island Army Hospital in December 1917. Renamed Embarkation Hospital no. 3 by the U. S. Army in July 1918, closed on January 1, 1919. Halloran General Hospital, Staten Island. Built as a hospital for retarded children, occupied by the U. S. Army as a veterans' hospital named for Col. Paul Stacey Halloran and open from November 1942 until April 1951.

It became the Willowbrook State School which closed in 1987.. Richmond Memorial Hospital, 375 Seguine Avenue, Staten Island. Opened on September 18, 1920, merged with Staten Island University Hospital and became its South Division in 1989. S. R. Smith Infirmary, 101 Castleton Avenue, New Brighton, Staten Island. Named for Dr. Samuel Russell Smith, it was renamed Staten Island Hospital in 1917. St. John's New Dorp, Staten Island. St. Vincent's 355 Bard Avenue, West New Brighton, Staten Island. Opened on Thanksgiving Day, 1903. Became part of Richmond University Medical Center Seaview Hospital, 460 Brielle Avenue Staten Island. Opened in 1913, closed in 1961; some of the remaining buildings are a nursing home. Sunnyside Hospital, Little Clove Road, Staten Island. Founded in 1940, moved to make way for the Staten Island Expressway in 1940 and relocated to Targee Street as Doctor's Hospital in 1963. Building was demolished for the highway. Veterans' Hospital, Fox Hills, Staten Island. Designated by the U. S. Army as Debarkation Hospital no. General Hospital no.

41, opened as Fox Hills Base Hospital on June 1, 1918. Renamed United States Public Health Service Hospital 61 in 1920, renamed United States Veterans' Hospital 61 on February 13, 1922. Ordered closed on March 7, 1922, all patients were transferred to other hospitals by some time in April. Veterans' Hospital, Staten Island. Built as a hospital for retarded children, occupied by the U. S. named Halloran General Hospital for. Col Paul Stacey Halloran, open from November 1942 until April 1951, it became Willowbrook State Hospital which closed in 1987. List of hospitals in New York List of hospitals in New York City List of hospitals in the Bronx List of hospitals in Brooklyn List of hospitals in Manhattan List of hospitals in Queens Media related to Hospitals in New York City at Wikimedia Commons

German submarine U-745

U-745 was a Type VIIC U-Boat built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine for service during World War II, and, lost at sea on 30 January 1945. U-745 was launched on 16 April 1943, under the command of Wilhelm von Trotha, who would remain its commanding officer for its entire service. U-745 had a crew of 45. German Type VIIC submarines were preceded by the shorter Type VIIB submarines. U-745 had a displacement of 769 tonnes when at the 871 tonnes while submerged, she had a total length of 67.10 m, a pressure hull length of 50.50 m, a beam of 6.20 m, a height of 9.60 m, a draught of 4.74 m. The submarine was powered by two Germaniawerft F46 four-stroke, six-cylinder supercharged diesel engines producing a total of 2,800 to 3,200 metric horsepower for use while surfaced, two AEG GU 460/8–27 double-acting electric motors producing a total of 750 metric horsepower for use while submerged, she had two 1.23 m propellers. The boat was capable of operating at depths of up to 230 metres; the submarine had a maximum submerged speed of 7.6 knots.

When submerged, the boat could operate for 80 nautical miles at 4 knots. U-745 was fitted with five 53.3 cm torpedo tubes, fourteen torpedoes, one 8.8 cm SK C/35 naval gun, 220 rounds, two twin 2 cm C/30 anti-aircraft guns. The boat had a complement of between sixty, she undertook four patrols during her service, sank one allied auxiliary ship, the Soviet minesweeping trawler T-45 Antikajnen, one allied warship, the Soviet fleet minesweeper T-76 Korall. On 30 January 1945, she was lost with all hands in the Gulf of Finland having been sunk by a mine laid by the Finnish minelayers Louhi and Ruotsinsalmi on 12 January 1945. Wilhelm von Trotha's body was found near Föglö, was buried three days later. No other bodies were recovered. Unlike most U-Boats, which suffered casualties during the course of service due to accidents or other causes, U-745 suffered no casualties at all, until the time of her disappearance. In late 2012 the Finnish diving team'Badewanne', after 10 years of searching, reported they had found both U-676 and U-745 in the Gulf of Finland south of Hanko.

Helgason, Guðmundur. "The Type VIIC boat U-745". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 29 December 2014