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Maricopa County, Arizona

Maricopa County is located in the south-central part of the U. S. state of Arizona. The U. S. Census Bureau estimated its population was 4,410,824 as of 2018, making it the state's most populous county, the fourth-most populous in the United States, containing more than half the population of Arizona, it is more populous than 23 states. The county seat is the state capital and fifth-most populous city in the United States. Maricopa County is the central county of the Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale, AZ Metropolitan Statistical Area. Maricopa County was named after the Maricopa Indians. There are five Indian reservations located in the county; the largest are the Gila River Indian Community. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 9,224 square miles, of which 9,200 square miles is land and 24 square miles is water. Maricopa County is one of the largest counties in the United States by area, with a land area greater than that of four states. From west to east, it stretches 132 miles and 103 miles from north to south.

It is by far Arizona's most populous county, encompassing well over half of the state's residents. It is the largest county in the United States to have a capital city. La Paz County – west Yuma County – west Pima County – south Pinal County – southeast Gila County – east Yavapai County – north Sonoran Desert National Monument Tonto National Forest As of the census of 2000, there were 3,072,149 people, 1,132,886 households, 763,565 families living in the county; the population density was 334 people per square mile. There were 1,250,231 housing units at an average density of 136/sq mi; the racial makeup of the county was 77.4% White, 3.7% African American, 1.9% Native American, 2.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 11.9% from other races, 2.9% from two or more races. 29.5 % of the population were Latino of any race. 19.1% reported speaking Spanish at home. There were 1,132,886 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.6% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.6% were non-families.

24.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.9% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.21. The population was spread out with 27.0% under the age of 18, 10.2% from 18 to 24, 31.4% from 25 to 44, 19.80% from 45 to 64, 11.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.10 males. The median income for a household in the county was $45,358, the median income for a family was $51,827. Males had a median income of $36,858 versus $28,703 for females; the per capita income for the county was $22,251. About 8.0% of families and 11.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.4% of those under age 18 and 7.4% of those age 65 or over. As of the 2010 census, there were 3,817,117 people, 1,411,583 households, 932,814 families living in the county; the population density was 414.9 inhabitants per square mile.

There were 1,639,279 housing units at an average density of 178.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 73.0% white, 5.0% black or African American, 3.5% Asian, 2.1% American Indian, 0.2% Pacific islander, 12.8% from other races, 3.5% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 29.6% of the population. The largest ancestry groups were: Of the 1,411,583 households, 35.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.8% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.9% were non-families, 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.25. The median age was 34.6 years. The median income for a household in the county was $55,054 and the median income for a family was $65,438. Males had a median income of $45,799 versus $37,601 for females; the per capita income for the county was $27,816. About 10.0% of families and 13.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.8% of those under age 18 and 7.0% of those age 65 or over.

According to data provided by the United States Census Bureau in October 2015 and collected from 2009-2013, 73.72% of the population aged five years and over spoke only English at home, while 20.32% spoke Spanish, 0.56% spoke Chinese, 0.47% Vietnamese, 0.41% Tagalog, 0.37% Arabic, 0.36% German, 0.30% French, 0.25% Navajo, 0.21% Korean, 0.20% Hindi, 0.15% Italian, 0.14% Persian, 0.13% Russian, 0.13% Serbocroatian, 0.12% Telugu, 0.12% Polish, 0.11% Syriac, 0.11% Japanese, 0.11% spoke Romanian, 0.10% spoke other Native North American languages at home. In 2010 statistics, the largest religious group in Maricopa County was the Diocese of Phoenix, with 519,950 Catholics worshipping at 99 parishes, followed by 242,732 LDS Mormons with 503 congregations, 213,640 non-denominational adherents with 309 congregations, 93,252 AG Pentecostals with 120 congregations, 73,207 SBC Baptists with 149 congregations, 35,804 Christian churches and churches of Christ Christians with 29 congregations, 30,014 ELCA Lutherans with 47 congregations, 28,634 UMC Methodists with 55 congregations, 18,408 LCMS Lutherans with 34 congregations, 15,001 PC-USA Presbyterians with 42 congregations.

Altogether, 39.1% of the population was claimed as members by religious congregations, although members of African-American denominations were underrepresented due to incomplete information. In 2014, the

Hunter 33-2004

The Hunter 33-2004 referred to as the Hunter 33-2, is an American sailboat, designed by Glenn Henderson and first built in 2004. The design was marketed as the Hunter 33, but is referred to as the Hunter 33-2004 or 33-2, to differentiate it from the other models that Hunter Marine has marketed under the same name, including the 1977 Hunter 33 and the 2012 Hunter E33, which remained in production in 2018 as the Marlow-Hunter 33; the design was built by Hunter Marine in the United States between 2004 and 2012, but it is now out of production. The Hunter 33-2004 is a small recreational keelboat, built predominantly of fiberglass; the hull has a solid fiberglass monolithic bottom, with sandwich sides. The deck is a polyester fiberglass sandwich, with Kevlar reinforcing; the design has a fractional sloop B&R rig, a plumb stem, a walk-through reverse transom, an internally-mounted spade-type rudder controlled by a wheel and a fixed fin keel or optional wing keel. The mast is made from aluminum. A mast-furling mainsail was an option.

With the fin keel it carries 3,578 lb of ballast. With the wing keel it carries 3,459 lb of cast iron ballast; the below decks headroom is 6.33 ft The boat has a draft of 5.50 ft with the fin keel and 4.50 ft with the optional shoal draft wing keel. The boat is fitted with a Japanese Yanmar diesel engine of 21 hp. A 29 hp engine was a factory option; the fuel tank holds 25 U. S. gallons and the fresh water tank has a capacity of 50 U. S. gallons. The design has a hull speed of 7.27 kn. List of sailing boat typesRelated development Marlow-Hunter 33Similar sailboats Abbott 33 C&C 3/4 Ton C&C 33 C&C 101 C&C SR 33 CS 33 Endeavour 33 Hunter 33 Hunter 33.5 Hunter 333 Hunter 336 Hunter 340 Mirage 33 Moorings 335 Nonsuch 33 Tanzer 10 Viking 33 Official brochure

Where We Live

Where We Live is the award-winning flagship news and talk program for WNPR. The program is hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil. Where We Live was created by John Dankosky in 2006; the show format includes live listener participation through phone and social media as well as long form interviews. It has been honored three times nationally as "Best Call-in Show" by PRNDI Where We Live has included numerous local and national guests such as Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy, retired NBA player, Jason Collins, Connecticut Senators Chris Murphy and Richard Blumenthal, Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Dave Brubeck, Gloria Steinem, United States ambassador Robert Ford and others