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Metric system

The metric system is an internationally recognised decimalised system of measurement. It is in widespread use, where it is adopted, it is the only or most common system of weights and measures, it is now known as the International System of Units. It is used to measure everyday things such as the mass of a sack of flour, the height of a person, the speed of a car, the volume of fuel in its tank, it is used in science and trade. The first nation to adopt the metric system was France, in the 1790s. In subsequent decades and centuries, most other nations adopted it in part or in full, with notable holdouts being Liberia and the United States. In its modern form, it consists of a set of base units: metre for length, kilogram for mass, second for time, ampere for electrical current, kelvin for temperature, candela for luminous intensity and mole for quantity. These, together with their derived units, can measure any physical quantity. Metric system may refer to other systems of related base and derived units defined before the middle of the 20th century, some of which are still in limited use today.

The metric system was designed to have properties that make it easy to use and applicable, including units based on the natural world, decimal ratios, prefixes for multiples and sub-multiples, a structure of base and derived units. It is a coherent system, which means that its units do not introduce conversion factors not present in equations relating quantities, it has a property called rationalisation that eliminates certain constants of proportionality in equations of physics. The units of the metric system taken from observable features of nature, are now defined by phenomena such as the microwave frequency of a caesium atomic clock which measures seconds. One unit, the kilogram, was defined in terms of a man-made artefact until but its precise definition now depends on a fixed numerical value for Planck's constant; the new definition was formally propagated on 20 May 2019. While there are numerous named derived units of the metric system, such as the watt and lumen, other common quantities such as velocity and acceleration do not have their own unit, but are defined in terms of existing base and derived units such as metres per second for velocity.

Units of the British imperial system and the related US customary system are defined in terms of the metric system. Notably, as per the International Yard and Pound Agreement the base units of the Imperial and Customary system are defined in terms of the metre and kilogram; the metric system is extensible, new derived units are defined as needed in fields such as radiology and chemistry. The most recent derived unit, the katal, for catalytic activity, was added in 1999. Recent changes are directed toward defining base units in terms of invariant constants of physics to provide more precise realisations of units for advances in science and industry; the first nation to adopt the metric system was France, in the 1790s. In subsequent decades and centuries, most other nations adopted it in part or in full, with notable holdouts being Liberia and the United States; the units of the metric system taken from observable features of nature, are now defined by in terms of seven physical constants which have been given exact mathematical quantities.

While there are numerous named derived units of the metric system, such as the watt and lumen, other common quantities such as velocity and acceleration do not have their own unit, but are defined in terms of existing base and derived units such as metres per second for velocity. In the modern form of the International System of Units, it consists of a set of seven base units: metre for length, kilogram for mass, second for time, ampere for electrical current, kelvin for temperature, candela for luminous intensity and mole for quantity. These, together with their derived units, can measure any physical quantity; the metric system was designed to have properties that make it easy to use and applicable, including units based on the natural world, decimal ratios, prefixes for multiples and sub-multiples, a structure of base and derived units. It is a coherent system, which means that its units do not introduce conversion factors not present in equations relating quantities, it has a property called rationalisation that eliminates certain constants of proportionality in equations of physics.

The metric system is extensible, new derived units are defined as needed in fields such as radiology and chemistry. For example, the katal, a derived unit for catalytic activity equivalent to a one mole per second, was added in 1999. Although the metric system has changed and developed since its inception, its basic concepts have hardly changed. Designed for transnational use, it consisted of a basic set of units of measurement, now known as base units. Derived units were built up from the base units using logical rather than empirical relationships while multiples and submultiples of both base and derived units were decimal-based and identified by a standard set of prefixes; the base units used in a measurement system must be realisable. Each of the definitions of the base units in the SI is accompanied by a defined mise en pratique that describes in detail at least one way in which the base unit can be measured. Where possible, definitions of the base units were developed so that any laboratory equipped with proper instruments would be able to realise a standard without reliance on an artefact held by another country.

In practice, such realisation is done under

Yamaha TDM

The Yamaha TDM is a sport touring motorcycle built by Yamaha Motor Company between 1991 and 2011. The TDM was not intended as an off-road machine, but as a comfortable yet manoeuvrable all-rounder, rather like the Ducati Multistrada of years. A TDM is too bulky and heavy for serious off-road work, but its long-travel suspension can cope with gravel tracks; the TDM's engine was derived from the Paris-Dakar winning Yamaha XTZ 750 Super Tenere. Yamaha intended to create a motorcycle capable of handling European mountain roads and coping with rougher road surfaces; the TDM's upright riding position seemed radical in its day. The TDM was imported into the United States for only two years, 1992 and 1993, it was never a big seller in the United Kingdom nor at first in the Netherlands, but sales were strong in other European countries in France and Greece In 1991 came the TDM850 MkI. The customers demand changed for more versatile bikes than for trail bikes; the engine is similar to the XTZ750. Maximum bhp is 73.7, overall performances are rather good considering this is not a sport-bike, not a sport-GT.

The TDM850 has an hybrid chassis: there is a Deltabox perimetric steel frame and rather long travel suspensions, more trail-like than pure road characteristics. The rear suspension is not progressive, the front suspension is a 41mm diameter cartridge fork; the engine is protected by a metal plate. The braking is far more efficient than with the XTZ, with three disk-brakes; the front wheel has a rather unusual 18' diameter. The 3VD - MkI was produced from 1991 until 1995 without any modification except the color pattern. Revolutionary when launched and years ahead of its time the Yamaha TDM850 was a sort of Multistrada 12 years before Ducati thought of it; as a serious ‘street trailie allrounder it’s pretty effective, too. The 900 is better, but the Yamaha TDM850 is still decent, good value and overlooked; the Yamaha TDM900 is a streetbiking oddball that’s as brilliant beating congestion as it is swinging bends. The parallel twin motor is spunky enough for fun, while the wide bars let you take charge and hustle.

It's such an easy motorcycle to ride. After 20 years producing the TDM, Yamaha Motor Company stopped the production in 2011. In 2014 rumors and photos leaked on the internet showed a new design of sport touring motorcycle with many similarities between the TDM and this new machine. In 2015 Yamaha released; when nobody at Yamaha mentioned the TDM during this project, many professionals and fans believed it is the direct successor

Voie Sacrée

The Voie Sacrée is a road that connects Bar-le-Duc to Verdun, France. It was given its name because of the vital role it played during the Battle of Verdun in World War I. After March 1916, along the 72 km of the "Voie Sacrée", transport vehicles were on the move day and night ferrying troops and supplies to the Verdun battlefield. During the initial crisis of 21 February to 22 March, 600 trucks per day had delivered 48,000 tons of ammunition, 6,400 tons of other material and 263,000 men to the battlefield. Beginning on February 21, all horse drawn traffic and troop movements on foot had been ordered off the road leaving it open for truck and motor car traffic only. After March 1916, one truck passed every 14 seconds, submitting the road to considerable wear and tear. Quarries had to be opened nearby to supply the road with crushed stone. Over the course of ten months, 16 labour battalions worked to keep the road in good order; the road had been recognized since 1915 as the only reliable vehicular road that remained in existence to supply Verdun safely.

All the standard gauge railway lines that could reach Verdun had been interrupted by German forces in late 1914. To compensate for this precarious situation the road had been widened to 23 feet during 1915, so it could accommodate the continuous up and down flow of two lines of truck traffic; this preemptive roadway improvement in 1915, plus success in organizing the transport system on the road, is what saved Verdun in 1916. A special unit responsible for controlling traffic and servicing the vehicles numbered 300 officers and 8,500 men; the rolling stock was made up of 3500 Berliet and Renault trucks plus 800 ambulances, the latter being Ford Model T's. Thirty breakdown trucks remained on the road at all times with repair crews stationed besides them. Any disabled vehicle was moved to the roadside so as not to interrupt the flow of traffic. Automobile repair shops in Bar-le-Duc and Troyes worked ceaselessly as did hydraulic presses that renewed the truck's solid rubber tyres. Le Chemin de Fer Meusien, a narrow-gauge single track railway, ran parallel to the roadside and was able to move 1,800 tons of supplies per day.

This included the bulk of the food for the army at Verdun - some 16,600 officers, 420,000 men, 136,000 horses - and brought back many wounded from the front. Beginning in March 1916, a standard gauge railway bypass was placed under accelerated construction: the Sommeilles-Nettancourt to Dugny line. During the summer of 1916 it would reconnect Verdun to the regional standard gauge network; the Voie Sacrée still exists but it is now an active secondary road. In 2006, the route was renumbered a reference to the road's most critical year; the city hall in the village of Souilly, on the Voie Sacrée, served as headquarters to Generals Philippe Pétain and Robert Nivelle during the Battle of Verdun. A large, well-preserved, two-story stone building fronting on the "Voie Sacree", the Souilly city hall is still in official use today. Several plaques on its facade remind the visitor of the historic role it played in 1916 during the Battle of Verdun and in 1918, during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Zone rouge Gen.

Allain Bernede,"Verdun 1916:un choix strategique, une equation logistique". in: Revue historique des Armees,242,2006. Jacques-Henri Lefevre. "Verdun,La plus grande bataille de l'Histoire",G. Durassie et Cie,Paris,1960

Amy Robbins

Amy Louise Robbins is an English stage, film and TV actress best known for her role as Dr. Jill Weatherill in the British television series The Royal. Before her role in The Royal she played Police Sergeant Rachel James in the BBC One hospital drama Casualty. Robbins has appeared in many TV series including EastEnders, Holby City, World's End, Where the Heart Is, Happiness, My Hero, Heartbeat and Pascoe, The Slammer, People Like Us, Holby City and Noah's Ark; the 1986 Granada Television sketch show Robbins featured her brother Ted Robbins and sisters Jane and Kate Robbins, along with herself guest appearing in various episodes. She went on to train at RADA Before landing her role as Dr Jill Weatherill in The Royal, Robbins played a recurring character, Police Sergeant Rachel James in the BBC One hospital drama Casualty for one series. Robbins appeared in the BAFTA winning TV film'My Beautiful Son'playing the part of Maureen opposite Julie Walters She played Mrs Johnstone in Blood Brothers, from 1 August 2011 to the end of January 2012, at the Phoenix Theatre, London.

She worked at Chichester Festival Theatre in The Accrington Pals with actress Katherine Kelly and has appeared in many more stage productions including A Day in the Death of Joe Egg. In 2011 Robbins performed for the Queen at Buckingham Palace in A Celebration of Youth in the Arts with RADA, playing the part of Lady Capulet alongside actors Anne Reid and Bryony Hannah. In April and May 2013 Robbins played Titania/Hippolyta in A Midsummer Night's Dream at the Royal & Derngate Theatre, Northampton. In 2014 she filmed World's End, a series of 36 15-minute episodes for CBBC. World's End premiers on 30 March 2015. From January to May 2016 Amy starred alongside her husband Robert Daws in Bill Kenright's touring production of Rehearsal For Murder. In March 2017, Robbins joined the cast of Channel 4 soap opera, Hollyoaks, as Lynette Drinkwell, the mother of Scott Drinkwell, played by Ross Adams, the sister of Diane O'Connor, portrayed by Alex Fletcher. Youngest of five children, Robbins was born in Higher Bebington to an acting family and trained at RADA.

She received an English and Drama degree from Goldsmiths, University of London. In February 2003 she married her The Royal co-star Robert Daws; the couple have two children. She is a first cousin once removed of ex-Beatle Paul McCartney and the younger sister of Ted Robbins and Kate Robbins and actress. Robbins has two other sisters and is the aunt of actress Emily Atack, her grandfather, served as the secretary of the Football Association of Wales for more than 35 years. Amy Robbins on IMDb

So You Think You Can Dance (Belgium and the Netherlands, season 1)

The first season of So You Think You Can Dance, a Dutch adaptation of the American show by the same name, premiered on RTL4 on September 4, 2008. Unlike following seasons of the show, the first was broadcast in the Netherlands only and features only Dutch contestants; the finale concluded with latin dancer Ivan Paulovich as champion. Paulovich won a choice of free dance study opportunities in the U. S. €20.000, a role in the musical Footloose. The first season featured permanent judges Jaakko Toivonen, Euvgenia Parakhina, Dan Karaty. Additional guest judges included Albert Verlinde, Penny de Jager, Kim-Lian van der Meij, Wendy van Dijk, Eszteca Noya. Open auditions for the first season were held in Amsterdam; those dancers which impressed a panel of judges were sent forward to a "bootcamp," a several-day-long series of dance workshops. After observing the dancers over the course of the workshops, the judges selected a Top 18 group of finalists for the main competition phase of the show, referenced as "The live shows."

From the top 18 to the top 10, the bottom three couples, based on each week's vote, were in danger of elimination from the competition and were required to "Dance for their lives" to avoid being the one of the two dancers dismissed. From the top 10 to the finale, dancers received votes as individuals, not couples, eliminations were determined by home viewer votes. Judge panel: Jaakko Toivonen, Euvgenia Parakhina, Dan Karaty, Albert Verlinde Results show 1 Group Choreography:"Don't Stop the Music"—Rihanna Dance for your life couples: Alessandro & Dapheny Giorgio & Marielle Bram & Julia Solo's: Dapheney: Onbekend Alessandro: "Vivo Per Lei"—Andrea Bocelli ft. Laura Pausini Marielle: "Come on Girl"—Taio Cruz ft. Luciana Giorgio: "Renegades of Funk"—Rage Against the Machine Julia: "Blessing Dance"—Nomak Bram: "Sex, Love, &Money" - Mos Def New couples: None Judge panel: Jaakko Toivonen, Euvgenia Parakhina, Dan Karaty Results show 2 Group Choreography: mix by "It's me, Bitches"—Swizz Beatz and "Don't Touch Me"—Busta Rhymes Dance for your life couples: Boris & Eline Giorgio & Marielle Constancia, Uri & Anuschka Solo's: Eline: "7 Days to Change Your Life"—Jamie Cullum Boris: "Bamboo Banga"—M.

I. A. Anusckha: "Secret Place"—Danity Kane Uri: "Rock Your Soul"—Elisa Marielle: "Ice Box"—Omarion Giorgio: "Que Se Sepa"—Roberto Roena New couples: Marielle and Boris Judge panel: Jaakko Toivonen, Euvgenia Parakhina, Dan Karaty, Penny de Jager Results show 3 Group Choreography: "Wow"—Kylie Minogue Dance for your life couples: Ceraldo & Giotta Ivan & Sigourney Bram & Julia Solo's: Giotta: "Green Light"—Beyoncé Knowles Ceraldo: "High Tide"—Pete Philly & Perquisite Julia: "Free Chilly"—Lupe Fiasco Bram: Onbekend Sigourney: "Sucka for Love"—Danity Kane Ivan: "Jump, Jive an' Wail "—The Brian Setzer Orchestra New couples: None Judge panel: Jaakko Toivonen, Euvgenia Parakhina, Dan Karaty, Kim-Lian van der Meij Results show 4 Group Choreography: "Kijk Naar Mij"—Fame met Kim-Lian van der Meij Dance for your life couples: Gianinni & Anne-May Uri & Anuschka Boris & Marielle Solo's: Anne-May: "Teardrop"—Massive Attack Giannini: "Hot Music"—Soho Anuschka: "Imaginary"—Evanescence Uri: "All You Gotta Change"—Alain Clark Marielle: "Viva La Vida"—Coldplay Boris: "Superman"—Robin Thicke New partners: From week five forward, new couples are assigned each week.

Judge panel: Jaakko Toivonen, Euvgenia Parakhina, Eszteca Noya, Albert Verlinde Solo's: Annemiek: "Breakaway"—Kelly Clarkson Ivan: Onbekend Marielle: "Put Your Hands Where My Eyes Can See"—Busta Rhymes Timor: Onbekend Julia: "The Workout"—Utada Hikaru Giannini: "Get Your Freak On"—Missy Elliott Sigourney: "You Will Be Under My Wheels"—The Prodigy Uri: "Dreaming With A Broken Heart"—John Mayer Anuschka: "Angel"—Do Bram: Onbekend Results show 5 Group Choreography: "Llego la Hora"—Mercado Negro Guest performance: Dirty Dancing Musical Cast Result: Marielle and Uri vallen af Judge panel: Jaakko Toivonen, Euvgenia Parakhina, Dan Karaty, Wendy van Dijk Solo's: Julia: "Promises"—Bump&Flex Timor: "Boogaloo Anthem"—Funkmaster Ozone Anuschka: "Respect Remix"—Real el Canario Giannini: "I Feel Good"—James Brown Sigourney: "Amazing"—Kanye West Ivan: "Nike Freestyle" Annemiek: "Goodbye Is The Saddest Word"—Céline Dion Bram: Onbekend Results show 6 Group Choreography: "Smooth Criminal"—Michael Jackson Guest performance: Burn the Floor Result: Sigourney and Bram vallen af Judge panel: Jaakko Toivonen, Euvgenia Parakhina, Dan Karaty, Kim-Lian van der Meij Solo's: Julia: "His Mistakes"—Usher Ivan: "Kalinka"—Ivan Bodrov Annemiek: "The Rose"—Bette Midler Giannini: "Feels Good"—Tony!

Toni! Toné! Anuschka: "Brave"—Idina Menzel Timor: "3 minutes"—DJ Fedde le Grand & DJ Funkerman Results show 7 Group Choreography: "Galvanize"—The Chemical Brothers Result: Anuschka and Giannini vallen af Judge panel: Jaakko Toivonen, Euvgenia Parakhina, Dan Karaty, Albert Verlinde Group Choreography Top 18: "Closer"—Ne-Yo Solo's: Annemiek: "I'm a Believer"—Christina Milian Ivan: "From Russia With Love"—Matt Monro Julia: "In The Closet"—Michael Jackson Timor: "I Can Make You Shuooo...."—Fingazz Results show 8 Group Choreography

Weequahic, Newark

Weequahic is an unincorporated community and neighborhood within the city of Newark in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. Part of the South Ward, it is separated from Clinton Hill by Hawthorne Avenue on the north, bordered by the city of Irvington on the west, Newark Liberty International Airport and Dayton on the east, Hillside Township and the city of Elizabeth on the south. There are many well maintained streets. Part of the Weequahic neighborhood has been designated a historic district; the name "Weequahic" is Lenni-Lenape for "head of the cove". The area was farmland until the late nineteenth century when it was developed into a middle-class, non-industrial neighborhood of detached single-family homes oriented around Weequahic Park. Many multi-unit homes were built to the west, still a few residential modernist highrises were built. Weequahic was a middle class Jewish neighborhood until the late 1960s, home to many synagogues and Jewish restaurants. Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, the largest hospital in Newark, was built under auspices of the Jewish community.

The only remaining connection to the Jewish community is Bragman's Delicatessen and Restaurant at 393 Hawthorne Avenue. Author Philip Roth grew up on Summit Avenue, graduated from Weequahic High School in 1950, many of his novels are set there. Heart of Stone, a documentary by Beth Toni Kruvant produced by Zach Braff, focuses on Weequahic High School's decline from 1950's when it graduated more PhDs than any other high school in the country, to one of Newark, NJ's most poorer performing schools. Principal Ron Stone inspires the students, to go to college, he partners with the African-American alumni association to help the current students. The post-World War II growth of suburbs and Second Great Migration of African Americans altered the demographic make-up of Newark in general and the Weequahic section in particular; the neighborhood might have stayed middle class if not for the devastating effects of real estate blockbusting, white flight, the construction of Interstate 78. I-78 separated the neighborhood from the rest of Newark.

There are still many well maintained streets in the neighborhood. The 1967 civil unrest was devastating to the district, though the focal point was in the Central Ward; the jewel of the neighborhood is the 311 acre Olmsted Brothers-designed Weequahic Park. This lovely park has a 2.2-mile rubberized jogging path around its 80-acre lake, Weequahic Golf Course the oldest public golf course in the United States. It is listed on the state and federal registers of historic places. Several highrise apartment buildings were built in the 1960s along the Elizabeth Avenue Corridor opposite the park. 440 Elizabeth Avenue Carmel Towers, is a residential tower and parking structure which opened in 1970. The apartment building is 25 stories tall. Built as market rate rentals, it became affordable housing for individuals and families with low income. Rent was based on 30% of Adjusted Gross Income and was subsidized by United States Department of Housing and Urban Development under a program known as Section 8.

Conditions in the building had deteriorated and became a place of drug-dealing and violence and in 2011, the building was vacated due to failed inspections. The buildings were sold in 2015, as of 2019 there were plans for redevelopment and gut rehabilitation of its 216 apartments and renaming as the Essex Lake House. Zion Towers, at 515 Elizabeth Avenue, is a residential tower built atop a parking structure that opened in 1972, one of the tallest buildings in Newark; the apartment building has 29 stories with 268 apartments. It provides affordable housing; the building was sold for $28 million in 2018 with plans to upgrade it. Other buildings include the 22-story Elizabeth Towers at 455 and the 24-story Heritage Estates at 555. Newark Public Schools operates public schools. Weequahic High School serves the neighborhood; the Weequahic Branch Library of the Newark Public Library serves the neighborhood. The branch, which opened in May 1929, was the sixth NPL branch to open between 1923 and 1946. In 1992 the library system renovated the branch for $1 million.

Newark history