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Morris Chestnut

Morris Lamont Chestnut is an American actor. He first came to prominence for his role, he has appeared in feature films and on television series, including the starring role of FBI Agent Will Keaton in the NBC TV series The Enemy Within. Chestnut was born in Cerritos, the son of Morris Chestnut Sr. and Shirley Chestnut. Chestnut's first professional acting role was as Jadon in Freddy's NightmaresA Nightmare on Elm Street: The Series, season 2, episode 19, which aired on February 18, 1990, his first feature film role was as Ricky Baker in Boyz n the Hood. He followed that up with roles in various TV movies. Chestnut played a role on Patti LaBelle's short-lived sitcom Out All Night, his career continued to rise with co-starring roles in standard big-budget studio films such as Under Siege 2: Dark Territory opposite Steven Seagal and Katherine Heigl and G. I. Jane opposite Demi Moore, he was a regular cast member on C-16, in the role of Special Agent Mal Robinson, from 1997 to 1998. In 1998, he won the annual Madden Bowl video game competition.

In 1999, Chestnut starred in The Best Man with Taye Diggs and Nia Long, as a professional football player on the eve of his wedding. The Best Man did well at the box office. For his performance, Chestnut earned an NAACP Image Award nomination, he again played a football player in The Game Plan. In 2001, he starred in The Brothers, a film centering on the themes of fidelity and success among young professionals. In 2004, he appeared as a firefighter in Ladder 49, he has worked with Steven Seagal three times: Under Siege 2: Dark Territory as Seagal's reluctant partner and lead male villain in Half Past Dead and Prince of Pistols. In 2015, Morris Chestnut played Derrick Dog Prince in the movie Heist. People magazine named Morris Chestnut as one of the "Sexiest Men Alive" in 2015. To prepare for his role as Professional Football Player, Lance Sullivan, in the movie The Best Man Holiday, Morris Chestnut had to get back into shape, his fitness training experience with Celebrity Fitness Trainer Obi Obadike inspired him to become Obadike's co-author on the health and fitness book, The Cut.

The Cut, published on April 18, 2017, contains exercise recipes. Morris Chestnut has been married to Pam Bryce-Chestnut since 1995; the couple have son Grant and daughter Paige. Love In The Nick of Tyme What My Husband Doesn't Know The Nutcracker Chestnut, Morris; the Cut: Lose Up to 10 Pounds in 10 Days and Sculpt Your Best Body. Hachette Book Group, Inc. ISBN 978-1455565238. Morris Chestnut on IMDb Morris Chestnut at Rotten Tomatoes Morris Chestnut at Yahoo! Movies

Toya (singer)

LaToya "Toya" Martin, better known by her mononym, Toya, is an American R&B singer from St. Louis, best known for her 2001 song, "I Do!!", which reached number 16 on the U. S. Billboard Hot 100. Toya was born LaToya Lacole Rodriguez on July 22, 1983, to a Puerto Rican father and an African American mother, she was named after La Toya Jackson. She graduated from St. Louis Country Day School in St. Louis County, Missouri. Toya’s career jump started when Courtney Benson and Tony Davis signed Toya to their production company, Hit City Music Group; the two managed another St. Louis native, Hip Hop superstar Nelly, they took Toya to Arista Records, where then-label chief L. A. Reid signed her to a major record deal instantly. Toya’s first single "I Do!!" had major chart success. And led to her self-titled debut album that same year, which landed on the Billboard 200, her second single was 2002's "No Matta What". In January 2011, Toya announced via Twitter. In April 2013, she stated. Toya is married to former University of Tennessee quarterback and current University of Tennessee football assistant coach Tamaurice "Tee" Martin.

On March 15, 2004, their son Kaden Martin was born. In 2012, Rodriguez gave birth to another son Cannon, according to her via Twitter. 2001: Toya US #109 "Stick Out Ya Wrist", from the XXX soundtrack "Same Ol Dirty", from Murphy's Law "I Had A Dream", from Hard Times In Da Country Official website Toya on IMDb

Australian Family Association

The Australian Family Association is a conservative political organisation with the stated aim of "supporting and strengthening traditional family values". It was founded in 1980 by the National Civic Council's president, B. A. Santamaria, to "promote the family as the natural and fundamental unit of society". According to its stated objectives, the AFA aims "to cultivate within society an appreciation that the integrity and wellbeing of the family is essential to the stability, morale and prosperity of the Australian nation", it defines a family as being "composed of father and children". It lobbies on issues related to its central purpose, such as the definition of marriage, media standards and classification, cloning and illicit drug use; the objectives for which the Australian Family Association is established are: to cultivate within society an appreciation that the integrity and well being of the family is essential to the stability, morale and prosperity of the Australian nation. To analyze laws and policies for their effect on the family and to formulate and promote corrective measures as necessary.

By means of conferences and the active involvement of individuals and groups, to create public awareness of the fundamental importance of the family unit. To facilitate research and act as a resource centre for the effective pursuit of the Association's objectives. To promote and encourage the development of services to assist families in difficulties. To do all such things as are incidental or conducive to the attainment of the above objectives; the AFA was founded by B. A. Santamaria. Current and former patrons of the organisation include sr.. Rupert Goodman, Major-General W. B. "Digger" James, Major-General Michael Jeffery, Sir Peter Lawler, Dame Elisabeth Murdoch and Jerzy Zubrzycki. Ross Fitzgerald criticised the AFA in 2008 for protesting against a film they had not viewed, criticised the Australian Classification Review Board for letting the protest influence them. At an anti same-sex marriage rally the AFA co-organised in 2011, guest speakers stated gay marriage should be "laughed at and ridiculed" and incorrectly associated gay marriage with paedophilia.

Mental health psychologist Paul Martin said such comments would be psychologically damaging to young gay people, stating "the last thing they need to hear are these kinds of offensive comments from people who purport to represent'family values'." American Family Association Official site

Sickles High School

Walter L. Sickles High School is a public high school in Tampa, United States. Constructed in 1997, it was named for the superintendent of Hillsborough County Public Schools from 1989 to 1996; as of 2011, Sickles High School was meeting the Adequate Yearly Progress mandated under the federal No Child Left Behind Act. According to the Florida Department of Education's 2012-13 School Accountability report, Sickles was graded as an "A" school; the school sponsors interscholastic teams for boys and girls in basketball, cross country, soccer, swimming and track & field. Young women may compete in cheerleading, flag football and volleyball. Young men may compete in baseball, Ice Hockey, wrestling. John Henson, NBA basketball player Ray-Ray McCloud, NFL wide receiver Sickles High School website Hillsborough County Public Schools website

List of ambassadors of the United States to Pakistan

The U. S. embassy in Karachi was established August 15, 1947 with Edward W. Holmes as Chargé d'Affaires ad interim, pending the appointment of an ambassador; the first ambassador, Paul H. Alling, was appointed on September 20, 1947. Anne W. Patterson was nominated as United States Ambassador to Pakistan in May 2007, replacing Ryan C. Crocker, appointed United States Ambassador to Iraq after completing three years of service in Pakistan. In 2010, her post was succeeded by Cameron Munter; the American ambassador is based in the U. S. Embassy, Islamabad. Paul H. Alling – Career FSOTitle: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: September 20, 1947 Presented credentials: February 26, 1948 Terminated mission: Left post June 27, 1948 H. Merle Cochran – Career FSOTitle: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: March 4, 1949 Presented credentials: Terminated mission: Avra M. Warren – Career FSOTitle: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: February 2, 1950 Presented credentials: February 25, 1950 Terminated mission: Left post November 26, 1952 John M. Cabot – Career FSOTitle: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: September 17, 1952 Presented credentials: Terminated mission: Horace A. Hildreth – Political appointeeTitle: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: May 13, 1953 Presented credentials: May 19, 1953 Terminated mission: Left post May 1, 1957 James M. Langley – Political appointee Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: June 13, 1957 Presented credentials: July 27, 1957 Terminated mission: Left post July 29, 1959 William M. Rountree – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: June 18, 1959 Presented credentials: August 17, 1959 Terminated mission: Left post February 7, 1962 Note: The capital of Pakistan was moved to Islamabad in August 1960.

Walter P. McConaughy – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: March 1, 1962 Presented credentials: March 20, 1962 Terminated mission: Left post May 27, 1966 Eugene Murphy Locke – Political appointee Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: May 27, 1966 Presented credentials: June 9, 1966 Terminated mission: Left Pakistan, April 16, 1967 Benjamin H. Oehlert, Jr. – Political appointee Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: July 27, 1967 Presented credentials: August 16, 1967 Terminated mission: Left post June 17, 1969 Joseph S. Farland – Political appointee Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: September 19, 1969 Presented credentials: November 15, 1969 Terminated mission: Left post April 30, 1972 Note: The post was vacant May 1972–December 1973. Sidney Sober served as chargé d'affaires ad interim during that period Henry A. Byroade – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: October 15, 1973 Presented credentials: December 5, 1973 Terminated mission: Left post April 23, 1977 George S. Vest – Career FSOTitle: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: Presented credentials: Terminated mission: Arthur W. Hummel, Jr. – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: June 8, 1977 Presented credentials: June 28, 1977 Terminated mission: Left post July 19, 1981 Ronald I.

Spiers – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: October 1, 1981 Presented credentials: October 29, 1981 Terminated mission: Left post October 27, 1983 Deane Roesch Hinton – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: November 21, 1983 Presented credentials: December 26, 1983 Terminated mission: Left post November 9, 1986 Arnold Lewis Raphel – Career FSOTitle: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: May 4, 1987 Presented credentials: June 24, 1987 Terminated mission: Died in office, August 17, 1988 Robert B. Oakley – Career FSOTitle: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: August 18, 1988 Presented credentials: September 1, 1988 Terminated mission: Left post August 29, 1991 Nicholas Platt – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: July 2, 1991 Presented credentials: October 24, 1991 Terminated mission: Left post November 3, 1992 John Cameron Monjo – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: October 9, 1992 Presented credentials: November 10, 1992 Terminated mission: Left post September 10, 1995 Thomas W. Simons – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: December 19, 1995 Presented credentials: January 25, 1996 Terminated mission: Left post August 24, 1998 William B.

Milam – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: August 3, 1998 Presented credentials: September 10, 1998 Terminated mission: Left post July 6, 2001 Wendy Jean Chamberlin – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: July 12, 2001 Presented credentials: September 13, 2001 Terminated mission: Left post May 29, 2002 Nancy Jo Powell – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: August 2, 2002 Presented credentials: August 16, 2002 Terminated mission: Left post November 5, 2004 Ryan C. Crocker – Career FSO Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Appointed: October 18, 2004 Presented credentials: November 25, 2004 Terminated mission: Left post March 28, 2007 Anne W. Patterson – Career FSO Appointed: July 2, 2007 Presented credentials: July 31, 2007 Terminated mission: Left post October 5, 2010 Cameron Munter – Career FSO Appointed: October 6, 2010 Presented credentials: October 27, 2010 Terminated mission: Left post May 7, 2012 Richard Olson – Career FSO Appointed: September 24, 2012 Presented credentials: October 31, 2012 Terminated mission: October 27, 2015 David Hale – Career FSO Appointed: September 21, 2015 Presented credential

A Night to Remember (Shonlock album)

A Night to Remember is the second studio album from Christian musician Shonlock, released on March 18, 2014, by Arrow Records and produced by Joshua Crosby, Solomon Otis and Tim Rosenau. The album saw positive critical reception. A Night to Remember garnered critical praise. At CCM Magazine, Andrew Greer rated the album four stars out of five, stating that "Shonlock is pure gold." Dwayne Lacy of New Release Tuesday rated the album four stars out of five, calling it a "solid offering" on which "This time there is an extra zest added to accent it." At Jesus Freak Hideout, David Craft rated the album four stars out of five, writing how the release "is a magnificently tasteful project, encompassing all of the elements that Shonlock has come to represent." Yet, Craft says that "The 10-track album can feel a little short, but is assertively complete, although there are a few weaker or average songs, the vast majority of the album hits a home run." Timothy Estabrooks of Jesus Freak Hideout rated the album three-and-a-half stars out of five, saying how he is "pleasantly surprised" with the album and "While Shonlock isn't breaking new ground here, instead sticking to a tried and true hip-hop influenced electronic dance pop sound, he's quite good at what he does."

Estabrooks states that "While this album may be too familiar or too radio-friendly to deserve an abundance of praise, it's still a great dance pop album and is worthy of more than a few spins."At Christian Music Review, Daniel Edgeman rated the album four-and-a-half stars out of five, noting how the release "has soft R&B along with the uptempo songs that get you moving", writes that the project is "a pep rally for your Christian walk." Jason Rouse of Alpha Omega News graded the album an A, saying that he recommends this album to anyone who just likes hip-hop music because "The lyrics are powerful and meaningful while the beats make it hard for you to sit still." Furthermore, Rouse notes that "This CD focuses on the moment someone invites Jesus into their life and the experiences that are tied to that decision." At CM Addict, David Bunce rated the album a perfect five stars, stating that "Every once in a while there’s an album that stands out as not just a piece of art, but a bridge which unites thought, powerful lyrics, fun", so he it is "definitely an album to remember!"

Jessica Morris of Jesus Wired rated the album an eight out of ten stars, calling it "A convoluted yet simple album, A Night To Remember sees Shonlock exercising the best of his musical abilities, drawing his audience closer to the truth of God." For the Billboard charting week of April 5, 2014, A Night to Remember charted at No. 20 on the Top Heatseekers Albums, No. 46 on the Christian Albums, No. 14 on the Gospel Albums chart