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Neil Finn

Neil Mullane Finn is a New Zealand singer-songwriter and musician, a member of Fleetwood Mac. With his brother Tim Finn, he was the co-frontman for Split Enz, a project that he joined after it was founded by Tim and others, became the frontman for Crowded House, he has recorded several successful solo albums and assembled diverse musicians for the 7 Worlds Collide project. Finn rose to prominence in the late 1970s with Split Enz and wrote the successful songs "One Step Ahead", "History Never Repeats", "I Got You" and "Message to My Girl", among others. Finn rose to international fame after Split Enz broke up in 1984. While his brother Tim left for England, Neil was the founder of Crowded House with Split Enz's last drummer Paul Hester in 1985; the group achieved international success in 1987 when they released the single "Don't Dream It's Over", written by Neil. He ended Crowded House in 1996 to embark on what was to become a moderately successful solo career, has released two albums with his brother Tim as the Finn Brothers.

In 2006, after the death of drummer Paul Hester, Finn reformed Crowded House and released their first studio album in over 13 years, Time on Earth, the band began a world tour. In 2010, Finn commenced another world tour with Crowded House in support of their 2010 release, Intriguer. In February 2014, Finn released Dizzy Heights. On 9 April 2018, it was announced that Finn would perform with Fleetwood Mac as part of their forthcoming tour in 2018, replacing Lindsey Buckingham after Buckingham's firing. Finn was born the youngest of four children to Mary Finn in Te Awamutu, New Zealand, his mother, a devout Catholic who moved to New Zealand from Ireland at the age of two, maintained a religious influence over the family. Speaking of Catholicism, Finn stated "It's a great fertile ground for pulling lyrics out. Lots of good stuff going on in there, good rituals and imagery and lots of guilt. It's a potent combination. I think you're blessed to be brought up with some kind of weird dogma like that."

His father, the son of a farmer from Waikato, served in the army in Italy and became an accountant during World War II. His parents instilled an "inspiring admiration of music" in young Finn. In addition to music, Finn enjoyed sports swimming, rugby and biking; as a child, Finn would perform at family gatherings with his older brother Tim. Finn recalled, "We'd sing all night, it was much part of our upbringing.... That was the first inkling of the seduction of live performance." He idolized his brother and wished to imitate his actions, learning to play guitar and piano at the same time Tim did. Tim was more public about his musical aspirations, won ten shillings in his school's annual talent contest shortly after enrolling; when Tim left to study at Sacred Heart College, a boarding school in Auckland, eight-year-old Neil started playing a guitar that his older brother left behind. A natural performer, Finn was nicknamed'The Ant' by his family due to his determined and ambitious nature. Finn attended Sacred Heart boarding Te Awamutu College.

He decided to become a musician at the age of 12 and throughout his school years performed in prisons and hospitals, as well as at home gatherings. In 1976, Finn formed the group After Hours, with Mark Hough, Geoff Chunn, Alan Brown. Not long after the band's debut performance, Finn's brother invited him to join Split Enz in London, replacing original singer-songwriter Phil Judd. By 1980, he was sharing lead singer duties and wrote their first international hit, "I Got You". Finn contributed to the band's albums, briefly assumed leadership of the band after Tim Finn left in 1984, prior to the cessation of the band. After the breakup of Split Enz in 1984, Finn formed a new band called The Mullanes with Split Enz drummer Paul Hester, guitarist Craig Hooper of The Reels, bassist Nick Seymour, whom Neil had met on the final Split Enz tour. Hooper left just before they recorded their first album, at which time the band was renamed Crowded House, inspired by the rental home they shared while recording in Los Angeles.

Crowded House went on to enormous success worldwide, in particular with two major hits: "Don't Dream It's Over" and "Weather With You". Both Neil and his brother Tim were invested as Officers of the Order of the British Empire for services to New Zealand music in the 1993 Queen's Birthday Honours List. After releasing four albums, Crowded House, Temple of Low Men and Together Alone, the group broke up in 1996, followed this action by releasing a greatest hits album Recurring Dream. Following the breakup of Crowded House, Finn embarked on a solo career; the album Afterglow was released in 1999, which contained unreleased Crowded House recordings. Finn appeared as part of the BBC Four's "Songwriters' Circle" series in 1999, explained that "Don't Dream It's Over" and "Better Be Home Soon" were both written with all of the elements of each song—such as lyrics and verses—emerging at the same time. Finn sang the opening lines of The Verve song "The Drugs Don't Work" to the opening chords of the latter song.

Finn penned a theme song for the All Blacks' participation in the 1999 Rugby World Cup, "Can You Hear Us?", that made it to the top of the NZ charts in

Andrew, Iowa

Andrew is a small city in central Jackson County, United States. The population was 434 at the 2010 census. Andrew, located in Jackson County, was named for Andrew Jackson. In 1841 Ansel Briggs, the first governor of Iowa, settled on a location outside of Andrew known as Bluff Mills moving his family to town, he became the Jackson County deputy treasurer in 1843 began a two-year term as Sheriff of Jackson County in 1844. Ansel Briggs won the election against Thomas McKnight for the governor of Iowa in 1846. Briggs served as governor until 1850. On September 22, 1909, the citizens of Andrew erected a granite monument in the city cemetery in his honor. Although Briggs was buried in Omaha, Nebraska, he was re-interred in 1909 in the Andrew Cemetery. Andrew was incorporated in 1863 with the first record of ordinances recorded in 1867; the county seat switched between Bellevue and Andrew several times until it was moved to Maquoketa in 1873. The county seat was responsible for much of the growth of the city.

An orphans asylum and courthouse was built along with other structures to serve the county government. The Jackson County Jailhouse was built in 1870 and is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places; the three-story limestone structure includes sheriff's office, cell room, exercise yard, a jailer quarters, prison kitchen. The jailhouse has since been restored and tours are given; the first school was made of logs in 1841 and the second was a framed structure. A brick building was built in 1889. Andrew Community School conducts preschool through 8th grade level classes, with the former high school being closed in 2011. Andrew is the birthplace of the first American military casualty of World War II, Captain Robert M. Losey, killed during a German Luftwaffe bombing of Dombås, Norway. Andrew has three churches: St John's Catholic Church, First Presbyterian Church, Salem Lutheran Church. Salem Lutheran Church was built one of Iowa's first orphanages; the Andrew Public Library is located in the City Hall on 11 E. Benton Street.

Books are available for all ages with a special program held for children of the community during the summer. The city park is located in the center of town and is the location of the historic Jackson County Jailhouse; the park offers playground equipment. Brush Creek is located just two miles outside of Andrew and the Mississippi River is fourteen miles northeast on Highway 62 at the intersection of Highway 52 in downtown Bellevue. Andrew's longitude and latitude coordinates in decimal form are 42.154059, -90.591765. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.27 square miles, all of it land. As of 2012, Andrew's population is 434 people. Since 2000, it has had a population growth of -4.98 percent. As of the census of 2010, there were 434 people, 155 households, 108 families residing in the city; the population density was 1,607.4 inhabitants per square mile. There were 173 housing units at an average density of 640.7 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 98.8% White, 0.5% African American, 0.7% from two or more races.

Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.5% of the population. There were 155 households of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.1% had a male householder with no wife present, 30.3% were non-families. 20.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.29. The median age in the city was 30.6 years. 30.9% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 47.5 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 460 people, 165 households, 120 families residing in the city; the population density was 1,747.9 people per square mile. There were 169 housing units at an average density of 642.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 99.13% White, 0.22% Native American, 0.65% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.83% of the population.

There were 165 households out of which 45.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.9% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 26.7% were non-families. 23.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.9% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.20. In the city, the population was spread out with 34.6% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 32.6% from 25 to 44, 13.9% from 45 to 64, 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 110.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.2 males. The median income for a household in the city was $36,563, the median income for a family was $35,938. Males had a median income of $28,333 versus $22,222 for females; the per capita income for the city was $12,860. About 6.1% of families and 9.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.1% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.

Andrew School is a public kindergarten through 8th grade school located in town. The school supported grades 9-12 before 2011, however high school students now have the option to open enroll to either Bellevue High School in Bellevue or Maquoketa High School in Maq

Mount Hobson (Great Barrier Island)

Mount Hobson is the highest mountain on Great Barrier Island, New Zealand. Located in the centre of the island, it rises 627 m above sea level. Various mountain tracks allow easy access to the summit, with the shortest track leading through the famous Windy Canyon. Great views over the island, to the Coromandel Peninsula and the Poor Knights Islands are possible from the top of the mountain; the summit area is a breeding ground for the black petrel, the track in this part is composed of boardwalks and stairs to protect the breeding areas and prevent erosion. A number of rare and declining plants on the mainland are restricted to Great Barrier Island are found on Mount Hobson, these include, Pittosporum kirkii, Epacris sinclairii, Kunzea sinclairii, Olearia allomii

Pequea Valley School District

The Pequea Valley School District is a school district of 1,589 students educated in 4 schools by 122 teachers in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit 13. Paradise Elementary School in Paradise, Pennsylvania is a K-6 facility in the Pequea Valley School District. In 2009, a new building was constructed adjacent to the old building; this new facility has features added to try to limit resource consumption, such as auto-dimming lights and water fountains that use collected rainwater. However, there have been talks of a new building project that would increase the number of classrooms to accommodate the many new students in the area. Salisbury Elementary School is a K-6 facility in the Pequea Valley School District, it houses around 360 students. Attendance at Salisbury Elementary School in Gap, Pennsylvania during the 2005–2006 school year was 96.11% the same as the 96.04% scored in the prior year. Students were 81.8% proficient in math, 72.9% proficient in reading.

The PV Intermediate school is a facility for 7-8 grade students. There is 255 attending. Attendance at Pequea Valley Intermediate School in Kinzers, Pennsylvania during the 2005–2006 school year was 96.10% the same as the 95.54% scored in the prior year. Students were 71.1% proficient in math, 69.5% proficient in reading. Attendance at Pequea Valley High School in Kinzers, Pennsylvania during the 2005–2006 school year was 92.91%, somewhat higher than the 87.97% scored in the prior year. Students were 57.1% proficient in math, 73.4% proficient in reading. Pequea Valley was a part of a deal with tech giant Apple, where Macbook laptops were given to each student in the high school; this program started in the 2011-2012 school year, this "One to One" learning program is a way Pequea Valley carries out their goal of Mass-Customized Learning, or MCL. Since the birth of the One to One program, there has been a great deal of expansion into the intermediate school, down into the elementary schools; this is a result of the growth the students have shown in academic performance as a result of the program.

There are now laptops for each student in grades 5-12, those "learners" in grades K-4 each have iPads. These are taken home each day by students to use for schoolwork or extracurricular activities. Pequea Valley High School's Varsity soccer team holds the 2012 State Championship title. Official website

Dennis Denisoff

Dennis Denisoff is a Canadian author and literary scholar who holds a professorship at the University of Tulsa. Denisoff was early member of The Kootenay School of Writing, he completed a PhD at McGill University and a postdoctoral fellowship at Princeton University, is McFarlin Professor of Victorian Literature and Culture at the University of Tulsa. His research specialties include gender/sexuality studies, decadence/aestheticism, eco-paganism, he was an early member of The Kootenay School of Writing in the 1980s, writing poetry and prose at the intersection of queer identity and LANGUAGE poetics. A runner-up in the Three-Day Novel Contest in 1989, Denisoff's debut novel Dog Years was published in 1991 by Arsenal Pulp Press while he was a Ph. D. student at McGill University. The novel, about a protagonist with HIV/AIDS, was a finalist for the Hugh Maclennan Prize in 1992 and the Norma Epstein Award. In 1994, Denisoff published a poetry collection, Tender Agencies, edited the anthology Queeries: An Anthology of Gay Male Prose.

His second novel, The Winter Gardeners, was published in 2003, in 2004 he published The Broadview Anthology of Victorian Short Stories. His academic publications include Erin Mouré and Her Works and Sexual Parody: 1840-1940, Sexual Visuality from Literature to film: 1850-1950, he is the editor of The Nineteenth-Century Child and Consumer Culture and a special issue of Victorian Review on Natural Environments, as well as being a co-editor of Perennial Decay: On the Aesthetics and Politics of Decadence and the digital humanities project The Yellow Nineties Online. He has been a co-editor of the journals White Wall Review and Nineteenth Century Studies, he is the recipient of the President's Award from the Nineteenth Century Studies Association and the Sarwan Sohata Distinguished Scholar Award from Ryerson University. He lives in Tulsa, with his partner Morgan Holmes. Dog Years The Winter Gardeners Tender Agencies Queeries: An Anthology of Gay Male Prose The Broadview Anthology of Victorian Short Stories Erin Mouré and Her Works Perennial Decay: On the Aesthetics and Politics of Decadence Aestheticism and Sexual Parody: 1840-1940 Sexual Visuality from Literature to Film: 1850-1950 The Nineteenth-Century Child and Consumer Culture The Yellow Nineties Online Dennis Denisoff

Heroes of Might and Magic

Heroes of Might and Magic, known as Might & Magic Heroes since 2011, is a series of video games created and developed by Jon Van Caneghem through New World Computing. As part of the Might and Magic franchise, the series changed ownership when NWC was acquired by 3DO and again when 3DO closed down and sold the rights to Ubisoft; the games feature turn-based, fantasy-themed conflicts in which players control armies of mythical creatures. The series began in 1995 with the release of the first title. A seventh installment, Might & Magic Heroes VII, was released on September 29, 2015. New World Computing closed after the production of Heroes of Might and Magic IV, since the rights to the franchise have been owned by Ubisoft. Nival Interactive developed the first game in the series since the changeover, Heroes of Might and Magic V. Black Hole Entertainment developed its sequel Might & Magic Heroes VI, but Limbic Entertainment developed patches and the DLC, as well as Might & Magic Heroes VII. Virtuos developed the Shades of Darkness standalone expansion for Heroes VI.

The series is directed at the DOS and Windows platforms, with sporadic support for Mac OS over the years. In addition to Windows and Mac platforms, Heroes II was ported to RISC OS and Heroes III was ported to Linux. GameTap has carried the first four games in the series since 2006. Remakes have appeared on the Game Boy Color. King's Bounty, an earlier game from New World Computing precipitated the design of Heroes and is included in some Heroes anthologies, it was remade and branded as a Heroes title for the PlayStation 2 game, Quest for the Dragon Bone Staff. A sequel to King's Bounty was released in 2008 as King's Bounty: The Legend. Heroes of Might and Magic: A Strategic Quest Heroes of Might and Magic II The Price of Loyalty Heroes of Might and Magic III Armageddon's Blade The Shadow of Death Heroes of Might and Magic IV The Gathering Storm Winds of War Heroes of Might and Magic V Hammers of Fate Tribes of the East Might & Magic Heroes VI Pirates of the Savage Sea Adventure Danse Macabre Shades of Darkness Might & Magic Heroes VII Lost Tales of Axeoth 1 - DLC Lost Tales of Axeoth 2 - DLC Trial by Fire Heroes of Might and Magic Heroes of Might and Magic II Heroes Chronicles Heroes of Might and Magic: Quest for the Dragon Bone Staff Heroes of Might and Magic Online Might and Magic: Heroes Kingdoms Might & Magic: Clash of Heroes Might & Magic Clash of Heroes: DLC I Am the Boss Might & Magic Heroes: Era of Chaos Heroes of Might and Magic Compendium, includes King's Bounty and first two Heroes games including expansion pack.

Released by 3DO. Heroes of Might and Magic II Gold, includes its expansion. Released by 3DO. Heroes of Might and Magic Millennium, includes King's Bounty, Heroes I, Heroes II Gold and Heroes III, but no expansions to Heroes III. Released by 3DO, in a 3 CD-ROM disc set. Heroes of Might and Magic III: Complete, a special edition that includes Heroes III and its expansions packs and a custom title screen. Released by 3DO. Heroes of Might and Magic Trilogy, Heroes I, Heroes II and Heroes III, but no expansions to Heroes II nor Heroes III. Released in a joint venture by 3DO and Ubisoft, in a 3 CD-ROM disc set. Heroes of Might and Magic: Platinum Edition, includes Heroes I, Heroes II Gold and Heroes III Complete. Released by 3DO, in a 4 CD-ROM disc set. Heroes of Might and Magic III+IV Complete, includes Heroes IV Complete. Released by Ubisoft, in a 1 DVD-ROM disc set. Heroes of Might and Magic IV Complete, includes all of its expansions. Released by Ubisoft. Heroes of Might and Magic V: Silver Edition, includes Heroes V and the expansion pack Hammers of Fate.

Heroes of Might and Magic V: Collector's Edition, includes all of its expansion packs. It includes three bonus DVDs including Storyline Trailers for the main game and its expansions, Developer Diaries, Heroes V Universe Album, Exclusive Monsters Test Videos, Fan-Made Heroes Game Encyclopedia and more. Released by Ubisoft. Might and Magic Heroes V: Epic Collection, includes both of its expansion packs. Released by Encore Games. Heroes Pack, includes Dark Messiah and Heroes V and its expansion packs. Available on Steam. Heroes of Might and Magic: Complete Edition, includes the first five Heroes games and their expansions; the included games are accompanied by extras and goodies, such as soundtracks DVDs, a faction booklet, a Heroes of Might and Magic V T-shirt or The Art of Might and Magic artbook. Released by Ubisoft. Might & Magic Heroes Collection, includes all their expansions, it was released by Mastertronic Games in a 4 disc set. Might & Magic Heroes VI: Limited Edition, includes Heroes VI and Heroes III along with one extra item and hero for Heroes VI.

Released by Ubisoft. Might & Magic Heroes VI: Deluxe Digital Edition, includes a digital copy of Heroes VI, two.pdf documents, the game's soundtrack and one month subscription on Heroes Kingdoms. Released by Ubisoft. Might and Magic Franchise Pack, includes Dark Messiah, Heroes V and its expansion packs, Clash of Heroes and its DLC, Heroes VI and its two adventure packs. Available on Steam. Might & Magic Heroes VI: Gold Edition, includes its two adventure packs. Rele