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New Georgia

New Georgia, with an area of 2,037 km2, is the largest of the islands in Western Province, Solomon Islands, the 200th-largest island in the world. New Georgia island is located in the New Georgia Group, an archipelago including most of the other larger islands in the province; the island measures 85 kilometres long by 41 kilometres wide. New Georgia forms part of the southern boundary of the New Georgia Sound. Kolombangara lies across the Kula Gulf to the west, Choiseul to the northeast, Vangunu is to the southeast, Rendova to the southwest, across the Blanche Channel. New Georgia is a volcanic island, surrounded in some places by a coral reef; the highest point is Mount Masse, with an elevation of 860 metres. The climate is wet and tropical, the island is subject to frequent cyclones. New Georgia is covered in the marshy areas mangroves are located; the population of the island was 19,312 in 1999. Most of the population resides on the south coast. On the southeastern coast is the village of Sege.

The islanders speak several Melanesian languages. The ten languages spoken on the island are from the family of New Georgia languages, a subgroup of the Northwest Solomonic languages within the Oceanic languages, a major group of the Austronesian family; the Kalikoqu is a tribe in the Roviana Lagoon on the southern side of New Georgia Island. The central part of New Georgia is the cradle of Roviana culture. A large complex of megalithic shrines and other structures was developed in the 13th century AD. Between the 15th and 17th centuries Roviana people moved over to smaller barrier islands at New Georgia with a hub in Nusa Roviana. Through trade and head hunting expeditions, Nusa Roviana turned into the regional centre of power and trade. In the late 19th century the rule of the last chief of head hunters, was overpowered by the British colonial army. On March 15, 1893, New Georgia was declared part of the British Solomon Islands protectorate; the Methodist Mission in New Georgia was established by Rev. John Frances Goldie in 1902.

He gained the loyalty of Solomon Islander members of his church. The relationship with the colonial administrators of the British Solomon Island Protectorate were fraught with difficulty, at this time due to Goldie’s effective control over the Western Solomon Islands. From 1927 to 1934 Dr Edward Sayers worked at the Methodist mission where he established a hospital at Munda and carried out fieldwork in the treatment of malaria; the island was occupied by the Empire of Japan in the early stages of World War II. During Pacific War, the United States' New Georgia Campaign opened with landings on New Georgia and nearby islands on 30 June 1943. New Georgia was secured by American forces on 23 August, after weeks of difficult and bloody jungle fighting, although fighting continued on some nearby islands until October 1943. Munda, the Japanese base on New Georgia Island, was the main objective of the assault on the island; this base was not overrun until 5 August 1943. The Japanese port at Bairoko Harbor, 13 km north of Munda, was not taken until 25 August.

Donald Gilbert Kennedy was a Coastwatcher stationed at Seghe on New Georgia during the Solomon Islands campaign during the Pacific War. Since 1978, the island has been part of the independent state of Solomon Islands. Seghe, Solomon Islands Toto isu/NguzuNguzu: War Canoe Prow Figureheads from the Western District, Solomon Islands

North Korea–Poland relations

Poland is one of the few countries that maintain diplomatic and limited trading relations with Democratic People's Republic of Korea. Poland recognized the DPRK on 16 October 1948 as the sole legitimate government of the whole Korea. North Korea maintains an embassy in Warsaw, Poland in Pyongyang; the current North Korean ambassador is Geun Ri. The current Polish ambassador is Krzysztof Ciebień. According to a 2013 BBC World Service Poll, only 5% of Poles view North Korea's influence positively, with 68% expressing a negative view. From June 1956 until 1993, Poland remained part of the NNSC named by the DPRK and Chinese Volunteers as part of the armistice agreement; when communism fell in Poland and Czechoslovakia, KPA took over the camps and expelled the Poles and Czechs. In 1989, Poland lost its status as a "friend" and its privileged position in contacts with the DPRK. Despite the change from communism to capitalism in Poland in 1989 and Poland's establishing relations with South Korea, relations between Poland and DPRK remain at a fair level.

Poland provides North Korea with small grants in farming equipment, etc. Economic relations between the two countries are maintained at the symbolic level of trade and sailing co-operation. Value of trade in 2007 was 15.207 million USD, including Polish export at 0.507 million USD: Polish export: 0.507 million USD Polish import: 14.7 million USDThe most important goods exported by Poland were meats and other food products and electronic tools as well as clothing products. Poland maintains its embassy in DPRK maintains its embassy in Warsaw; as of 2009, The Republic of Poland and DPRK signed 16 bilateral treaties, 12 as People's Republic of Poland and 4 as Republic of Poland. Agreement between the Government of the Polish People's Republic and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on creation of Polish Red Cross hospital in KoreaSignature date: 1953-05-08 Agreement on cultural cooperation between the Government of the Polish People's Republic and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Signature date: 1956-05-11 Protocol between the Government of the Polish People's Republic and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea concerning the amendment to article 4 of the Agreement on Cultural Cooperation, signed at Pyongyang on 11 May 1956. Signature date: 1966-09-28 Agreement between the Government of the Polish People's Republic and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on the establishment of the Consultative Commission for Economic and Technical MattersSignature date: 1972-10-04 Agreement between Governments of the Polish People's Republic and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on mutual granting rights to use of lots designated for construction of embassy buildingsSignature date: 1966-05-10 Protocol partial amending the Agreement between Governments of the Polish People's Republic and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on mutual granting rights to use of lots designated for construction of embassy buildingsSignature date: 1977-05-30 Agreement between the Government of the Polish People's Republic and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on air servicesSignature date: 1978-08-28 Consular Convention between the Polish People's Republic and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Signature date: 1982-08-03 Consular Convention between the Polish People's Republic and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. Signature date: 1982-08-03 Agreement between the Government of the Polish People's Republic and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on cooperation in production of MI-2 helicopters in KoreaSignature date: 1986-03-27 Agreement between the Government of the Polish People's Republic and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on deliveries of goods and payments of thereto related produce of MI-8 helicoptersSignature date: 1986-10-30 Agreement between the People's Republic of Poland and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on legal assistance in civil and criminal matters. Signature date: 1986-09-28 Agreement between the Government of the Polish People's Republic and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on conversion of the Korean-Polish Maritime Brokering Company into the Korean-Polish Shipping Company - a Joint Stock Limited LiabilitySignature date: 1987-02-11 Trade and Payment Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Poland and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Signature date: 1992-05-12 Protocol between the Government of the Republic of Poland and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on regulation of mutual obligations in clearing rubles in payment relations due to the alteration of the convertible currency payments from 1 January 1991Signature date: 1992-05-12 Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Poland and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on co-operation of fisheriesSignature date: 1997-10-02 Protocol between the Government of the Republic of Poland and the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on validity of bilateral international agreements in relations between the Republic of Poland and the Democratic People's Republic of KoreaSignature date: 2007-02-01 Polish visits to North Korea: 1986 - Chairman Wojciech Jaruzelski 2007 - Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs of Poland 2004 - Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs of Poland 2001 - Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs of Poland Korean visits to Poland: 1956 - Premier Kim il Sung 1984 - President Kim il Sung 2008 - Vice Minister of Foreign Affair

Statue of Queen Victoria, Reading

The statue of Queen Victoria stands at the western end of Friar Street outside the Town Hall of Reading, Berkshire, in southern England. The statue stands atop a substantial plinth. Queen Victoria was the queen of many realms in the British Empire, Empress of India, she is memorialised in statuary, throughout the former British Empire, elsewhere. George Blackall Simonds was a Reading director of H & G Simonds Brewery, he exhibited at the Royal Academy. Simonds studied under Johannes Schilling in Dresden, Louis Jehotte at The Academy of Brussels, he created over 200 pieces in many different media. While The Falconer is in Central Park, New York, much of his larger work is to be found in or near Reading. Substantial pieces were commissioned for Indian locations and Calcutta; the Maiwand Lion in the Forbury Gardens is his, the Statue of George Palmer, now in Palmer Park and that of H. Blandy, another mayor of Reading. In 1922 he designed the war memorial at Bradfield, which commemorates the deaths in the First World War of those of the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers, including his son.

Maiwand Lion The Falconer Statue of George Palmer Media related to Statue of Victoria in Reading at Wikimedia Commons

Drawer dishwasher

A dishdrawer is a type of dishwashing machine invented and manufactured by Fisher & Paykel. They are available under several brands depending on geographic location Fisher & Paykel, Kenmore Appliances, KitchenAid, Bauknecht following a distribution agreement with Whirlpool. In 1987 Fisher & Paykel staff engineer Adrian Sargeant and designer Phil Brace developed the DishDrawer concept. A DishDrawer is based on a design similar to filing cabinet with each dishwasher having two independent cabinets; the DishDrawer was exhibited in 1996 at Domotechnica and was launched in 1997. By this time Fisher & Paykel had spent $10 million on the machine's development, they are marketed as either an individual drawer, for small apartments or homes or double units which have two separate drawers stacked together. Each drawer is independent to be used on different loads, it allows dishes to be washed in one drawer as the other is filled. And is more energy efficient. DishDrawer washers have capacity restrictions due to their lower height, limiting the size of dishes that can be placed inside.

In response to this, Fisher & Paykel have added'Tall' models to their DishDrawer line up. Early models were subject to complaints about the noise; this has been improved on with models. The concept behind the dishdrawer is "to use compact technologies to provide a space efficient dishwasher." Fisher and Paykel have made several dish drawer configurations with single and double varieties available. This means you can install two single dishdrawers side by side toward the top of the bench for easy access or you can install a double dishdrawer where the two drawers are stacked. DishDrawers provide plenty of flexibility"

Santiago Jamiltepec

Santiago Jamiltepec is a town, the seat of surrounding municipality of the same name, in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. It is located in the Jamiltepec District in the west of the Costa Chica Region, 30 km east of Pinotepa Nacional on Federal Highway 200, 460 km southwest of state capital Oaxaca de Juárez. In the 2005 INEGI census, the municipality reported a population of 17,206 inhabitants, of whom 4,155 spoke an indigenous language, predominantly Mixtec; as municipal seat, Santiago Jamiltepec has governing jurisdiction over the following communities: Atotonilquillo Charco Nduayoo Cuyuche, El Añil, El Guayabo, El Guineo, El Platanillo, El Santo, El Zapote Negro, El Zarzal, Emiliano Zapata, Espiga Verde, Finca la Natividad, La Comunal, La Esperanza, La Fábrica, La Huichicata, La Humedad, La Palmera, La Tuza, Las Palmitas, Los Cerreros, Parcela de Producción INI, Paso de la Reina, Patria Nueva, Piedra Ancha, Piedra Blanca, Plan de los Amates, Rancho la Isla, Rancho San Antonio, Río Viejo, San José de las Flores, San José Río Verde, San Miguel de los Pinos, Santa Cruz Flores Magón, Santa Elena Comaltepec, Unión Linda Vista Santiago Jamiltepec

Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis

Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis is a form of glomerulonephritis associated with the mesangium. There is some evidence, it is classified. Common shorthand for the condition is MesPGN. Mesangial cells in the renal glomerulus use endocytosis to take up and degrade circulating immunoglobulin; this normal process stimulates mesangial cell matrix deposition. Therefore, during times of elevated circulating immunoglobulin one would expect to see an increased number of mesangial cells and matrix in the glomerulus; this is characteristic of nephrotic syndromes. The clinical presentation of MesPGN is varied, although persistent or recurring microscopic or macroscopic hematuria with mild proteinuria is most common. Studies are performed in most patients to exclude known causes. MesPGN can be a finding in resolving postinfectious. Isolated deposits with scanty subendothelial or subepithelial deposits on electron microscopy may be seen in this situation indicating a likelihood of MesPGN. Of the eleven known cases of nephrotic syndrome, three early cases went untreated.

Subsequently, four were treated with steroids and four treated with steroids and cytotoxic drugs, one in each group achieved remission while the remaining patients continued to have steroid dependency or resistance. Two of these latter patients manifested steroid responsiveness, steroid resistance, spontaneous remission at different times in their courses. Renal function remained normal in all