Oregon State Beavers men's basketball

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Oregon State Beavers men's basketball
2017–18 Oregon State Beavers men's basketball team
Oregon State Beavers wordmark.svg
University Oregon State University
First season 1901–02
All-time record 1711–1318 (.565)
Head coach Wayne Tinkle (4th season)
Conference Pac-12
Location Corvallis, Oregon
Arena Gill Coliseum
(Capacity: 9,604)
Nickname Beavers
Student section Beaver Dam
Colors Orange and Black[1]
         
Uniforms
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Home jersey
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Team colours
Home
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Away jersey
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Team colours
Away
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Alternate jersey
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Team colours
Alternate
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1949, 1963
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1949, 1955, 1962, 1963, 1966, 1982*
*vacated by NCAA
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1955, 1962, 1963, 1966, 1975, 1982*
*vacated by NCAA
NCAA Tournament Round of 32
1975, 1980*, 1981*, 1982*
*vacated by NCAA
NCAA Tournament appearances
1947, 1949, 1955, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1975, 1980*, 1981*, 1982*, 1984, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1990, 2016
*vacated by NCAA
Conference regular season champions
1909, 1912, 1916, 1918, 1933, 1947, 1949, 1955, 1958, 1966, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1990

The Oregon State Beavers men's basketball program, established in 1901, is the intercollegiate men's basketball program of Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. Members of the Pac-12 Conference in NCAA Division I, the team plays home games on campus at Gill Coliseum, and the current head coach is Wayne Tinkle.

Oregon State has seventeen appearances in the NCAA Tournament (though three (198082) were later vacated by the NCAA). The Beavers advanced to the Final Four twice (1949, 1963), and their most recent appearance was in 2016, a first round loss to Virginia Commonwealth.

Conferences[edit]

Years Conference
1901–1908 Independent
1908–1915 Northwest Conference (NWC)
1915–1959 Pacific Coast Conference (PCC)
1959–1964 Independent
1964–present Pac-12 Conference ^

^ Pac-12's previous names: AAWU (1959–1968), Pacific-8 (1968–1978), and Pacific-10 (1978–2011)

Coaches[edit]

The Oregon State men's basketball team has had 21 head coaches, with one interim (2008). Both Amory T. "Slats" Gill and Ralph Miller are members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Craig Robinson, the coach preceding Wayne Tinkle, was hired by OSU in 2008 out of Brown University, where he had just coached the Bears to a school-record 19 wins.[2] Robinson is the brother of United States first lady Michelle Obama, and the brother-in-law to United States President Barack Obama,[3] the longest-tenured head coach was Slats Gill, who was the coach for 36 seasons, winning 599 games during his time at OSU. The current coach, Wayne Tinkle, was hired by OSU in 2014 from the University of Montana – Missoula, where he coached the Montana Grizzlies to two Big Sky Conference championships and a school-record 25 wins.

Head Coach Years Win-Loss Pct.
J.B. Patterson 1902 1–2 .333
J.W. Viggers 1903 5–1 .883
W.O. Trine 1904–1907 39–7 .848
Roy Heater 1908 7–4 .636
E.D. Angell 1909–1910 19–8 .704
Clifford Reed 1911 3–5 .375
E. J. Stewart 1912–1916 67–33 .670
Everett May 1917 11–7 .611
Howard Ray 1918 15–0 1.000
H. W. Hargiss 1919–1920 10–25 .286
R. B. Rutherford 1921–1922 27–19 .587
Bob Hager 1923–1928 115–53 .685
Slats Gill 1929–1964 599–392 .604
Paul Valenti 1965–1970 91–82 .526
Ralph Miller 1971–1989 359–186 .659
Jim Anderson 1990–1995 79–90 .467
Eddie Payne 1996–2000 52–88 .371
Ritchie McKay 2001–2002 22–37 .372
Jay John 2003–2008 72–97 .426
Kevin Mouton (interim) 2008 0–13 .000
Craig Robinson 2008–2014 93–104 .469
Wayne Tinkle 2014–present 41–54 .432

History[edit]

1980–83 – Orange Express[edit]

The 1980–81 Oregon State men's basketball season was arguably one of the best yet most upsetting basketball seasons in Oregon State history, the team was referred to as the Orange Express and was led by Beaver legendary coach Ralph Miller.[4][5][6] The Orange Express season was led by Beaver great, Steve Johnson, in his last year at OSU, and the Beavers were second in the final polls, released prior to the NCAA tournament, this was the first time in OSU history that the Beavers won at UCLA, and the Orange Express spent a school record eight weeks ranked first in at least one of the AP and Coaches Polls.[7] At the end of the regular season, the Beavers were 26–1 and entered the 48-team NCAA tournament as the top seed in the West region, they had a bye in the first round, but were upset in their opening game by #8 seed Kansas State 50–48 in the second round, at Pauley Pavilion in Los Angeles.[8] Miller was awarded UPI and AP Coach of the Year honors and Steve Johnson received All-American honors.[4]

For three seasons beginning in 1980–81, OSU posted an overall record of 77–11 (.875), second only to DePaul's 79–6 record over the same seasons. The Beavers' record included a 35–1 home record at Gill Coliseum, including a school best 24 consecutive home wins.[4]

However, NCAA sanctions followed these standout teams,[9] the NCAA found that many players, from 1979–1983 were involved in improper arrangements with outside representative related to the purchase of complimentary basketball tickets and the receipt of other prohibited benefits.[9] The NCAA vacated appearances from the 1980, 1981, and 1982 tournaments.[10]

Postseason[edit]

NCAA tournament results[edit]

The Beavers have appeared in the NCAA Tournament 17 times, their combined record is 12–20. OSU had three NCAA Tournament appearances (1980, 1981 and 1982) vacated by the NCAA, resulting in 14 recognized appearances and an "official" NCAA Tournament record of 10–17, they last "officially" won an NCAA Tournament game in 1975--as of 2016-17, the longest drought between NCAA Tournament wins (42 years) of a team from a major conference.

Year Seed Round Opponent Result/Score
1947 Elite Eight
Regional 3rd Place Game
Oklahoma
Wyoming
L 55–56
W 63–46
1949 Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Arkansas
Oklahoma A&M
Illinois
W 56–38
L 30–55
L 53–57
1955 Round of 24
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Bye
Seattle
San Francisco
 
W 83–71
L 56–57
1962 Round of 25
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Seattle
Pepperdine
UCLA
   W 69–65 OT
W 69–67
L 69–88
1963 Round of 25
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona State
Cincinnati
Duke
W 70–66
W 65–31
W 83–65
L 46–80
L 63–85
1964 Round of 25 Seattle L 57–61
1966 Round of 22
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Bye
Houston
Utah
 
W 63–60
L 64–70
1975 Round of 32
Sweet Sixteen
Regional 3rd Place Game
Middle Tennessee State
Indiana
Central Michigan
W 78–67
L 71–81
L 87–88
1980* #2 Round of 48
Round of 32
Bye
#10 Lamar
 
L 77–81*
1981* #1 Round of 48
Round of 32
Bye
#8 Kansas State
 
L 48–50*
1982* #2 Round of 48
Round of 32
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Bye
#7 Pepperdine
#3 Idaho
#1 Georgetown
 
W 70–51*
W 60–42*
L 45–69*
1984 #6 Round of 48 #11 West Virginia L 62–64
1985 #10 Round of 64 #7 Notre Dame L 70–79
1988 #12 Round of 64 #5 Louisville L 61–70
1989 #6 Round of 64 #11 Evansville    L 90–94 OT
1990 #5 Round of 64 #12 Ball State L 53–54
2016 #7 Round of 64 #10 VCU L 67–75
NCAA Tournament Seeding History

The NCAA began seeding the tournament in 1979.

Years → '80 '81 '82 '84 '85 '88 '89 '90 '16
Seeds→ 2* 1* 2* 6 10 12 6 5 7

* Appearances and results from 1980, 1981, and 1982 were later vacated by the NCAA.

NIT results[edit]

The Beavers have appeared in the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) four times, their combined record is 3–4.

Year Round Opponent Result
1979 First Round Nevada L 61–62
1983 First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Idaho
New Orleans
Fresno State
W 77–59
W 88–71
L 67–76
1987 First Round
Second Round
New Mexico
California
W 85–82
L 62–65
2005 Opening Round Cal State Fullerton L 83–85

CBI results[edit]

The Beavers have appeared in the College Basketball Invitational (CBI) four times.
Their combined record is 7–4, and they were the champions in 2009.

Year Round Opponent Result
2009 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Finals–Game 1
Finals–Game 2
Finals–Game 3
Houston
Vermont
Stanford
UTEP
UTEP
UTEP
W 49–45
   W 71–70 OT
   W 66–63 OT
W 75–69
L 63–70
W 81–73
2010 First Round Boston University L 78–96
2012 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Western Illinois
TCU
Washington State
W 80–59
W 101–81
L 55–72
2014 First Round Radford L 92–96

All-time record vs. Pac-12 opponents[edit]

Opponent Wins Losses Pct. Streak
Arizona 21 61 .256 Arizona 3
Arizona St. 42 44 .488 ASU 1
California 62 87 .416 Cal 5
Colorado 7 14 .333 OSU 1
Oregon 186 162 .534 Oregon 3
Stanford 73 70 .510 Stanford 1
UCLA 38 94 .288 UCLA 2
USC 64 71 .474 USC 2
Utah 12 17 .414 OSU 1
Washington 140 159 .468 Washington 1
Wash. St. 170 124 .578 WSU 1
  • Note all-time series includes non-conference matchups.

Rivalries[edit]

Oregon Ducks — The Civil War is Oregon State's main rivalry.

Washington Huskies — The Dog Fight is one of Oregon State's lesser known rivalry games.

Washington State Cougars — As land-grant universities, WSU and OSU have a longtime regional rivalry.

Arizona Wildcats - The Cat's Meow was coined during the Ralph Miller era when the Beavers would match-up against famed-coach Lute Olson's squad.

Notable players[edit]

Oregon State has had 75 all-conference and 32 All-America selections, five Pac-10 Players of the Year, 42 players selected in the NBA Draft, and 24 players that have gone on to play in the NBA.[2][11] Additionally, OSU basketball alumni have 4 gold medals at the Olympics, including one by Lew Beck, who never played in the NBA. A total of 7 players have won 11 NBA titles, including three by A. C. Green, two by Brent Barry, two by Mel Counts, and one each by Red Rocha, Dave Gambee, Lonnie Shelton, and Gary Payton.[12]

NBA players[edit]

Retired numbers[edit]

Oregon State has retired the jersey numbers of five players:[13]

No. Player Years
20  Gary Payton 1986–1990
21  Mel Counts 1961–1964
25  Ed Lewis 1931–1933
33  Steve Johnson 1976–1981
45  A.C. Green 1981–1985

NCAA records[edit]

The individual and team NCAA records below are current as of the end of the 2015–16 season.[14]

Individual Records

  • Field Goal Percentage (Single season)
  • Field Goal Percentage (Career, min. 400 made and 4 made per game)
  • Field Goal Percentage (Single game, min. 12 field goals made)
    • 1st (tie) – 100% Steve Johnson vs. Hawaii-Hilo (13 of 13), Dec. 5, 1979
  • Field Goal Percentage – Senior
  • Field Goal Percentage – Junior
  • Total Rebounds (Single game)
  • Assists (Career)
  • Average Assists Per Game (Career, min. 550 assists)
  • Steals (Career)

Team Records

  • Free-Throw Percentage (Single game, min. 30 free throws made)
    • 16th (tie) – 30–31 vs. Memphis, Dec. 19, 1990
  • Steals (Single game)
    • 22nd (tie) – 27 vs. Hawaii-Loa, Dec. 22, 1985
  • Field Goal Percentage (Season)
    • 3rd – 56.4% – 1981
    • 26th – 54.4% – 1980
  • All-Time Victories (Min. 25 years in Division I)
    • 22nd – 1,706 wins
  • Games played vs. Single Opponent
    • 1st – 346 vs. Oregon
    • 2nd – 298 vs. Washington
    • 4th 293 vs. Washington State
  • Victories vs. Single Opponent
    • 1st – 186 vs. Oregon
    • 6th 170 vs. Washington State

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Colors | University Relations and Marketing | Oregon State University". Retrieved May 2, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Craig Robinson Era Begins at Oregon State". Retrieved 2008-12-21. 
  3. ^ Reynolds, Bill (2008-02-14). "He's much more than Obama's brother-in-law". The Providence Journal. Retrieved 2008-11-09. 
  4. ^ a b c "OSU Sports History Minute". Retrieved 2010-12-22. 
  5. ^ "1980-81 OSU Basketball Team". Retrieved 2010-12-22. 
  6. ^ "Orange Distress" (PDF). Retrieved 2010-12-22. 
  7. ^ "1980-81 College Basketball Polls". sports-reference.com. Retrieved February 24, 2017. 
  8. ^ Withers, Bud (March 15, 1981). "Tournament jinx ruins Beavers again". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 1B. 
  9. ^ a b "Herald-Journal - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 2016-05-16. 
  10. ^ "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. pp. 48–49. Retrieved February 6, 2018. 
  11. ^ "NBA/ABA Players who attended Oregon State University". Archived from the original on 2006-04-26. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  12. ^ "Barry Wins Another NBA Title". Retrieved 2008-12-21. 
  13. ^ http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/orst/sports/m-baskbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/oregon-st-history.pdf
  14. ^ "2016-17 NCAA Men's Basketball Record Book" (PDF). ncaa.org. Retrieved February 24, 2017. 

External links[edit]